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robertmf
11-06-2012, 02:32
It is good that the children have a better world than the parents.

I find it surprisingly ironic that N. Khrushchev's son is now an American and can go to :cheerleader: Disneyland :bong:

Sergei Khrushchev - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Russian Lad
11-06-2012, 03:05
N. Khrushchev's son is now an American and can go to Disneyland

I envy this exceptional opportunity he has got and am jealously biting my nails now.:):bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::cheerleader:

robertmf
11-06-2012, 03:56
I envy this exceptional opportunity he has got and am jealously biting my nails now.:):bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::cheerleader:

Sergei Khrushchev happens to be друг и друг with the son of F. Gary Powers, U-2 pilot :)

celia
11-06-2012, 17:42
Shoe banging is so 1960 - it's been supplanted by shoe throwing, much more entertaining...

Viola
11-06-2012, 20:49
I believe that Brezhnev's and Gorbachev's descendants are Americans as well. And Medvedev's son lives in the USA.
I wonder if children of any of the US presidents left the country after he ended his term in the office :rolleyes:

TolkoRaz
11-06-2012, 22:15
It seems to me that most Americans tell me that they are Irish and, of course, the current President is of Kenyan origin!

martpark
12-06-2012, 10:22
Stalin's daughter famously defected to marry an Indian. Lived in the US most of her adult life.

NotMe
12-06-2012, 10:38
Stalin's daughter famously defected to marry an Indian. Lived in the US most of her adult life.

....and died in "Richland Center". In Russia it's called "Dom prestarelyh". :(

martpark
12-06-2012, 12:53
....and died in "Richland Center". In Russia it's called "Dom prestarelyh". :(

'Nursing home' is what she called it but there are many names for them(btw, Richland Center is the town's name). I would say it is a much better way to pass your final years than in a two room kvartira with no lift. There was not one member of the Stalin family who died as 'pleasantly' as she did.

'Ms. Peters was said to be enjoy sewing and reading, mainly nonfiction, choosing not to own a television set. In an interview with The Wisconsin State Journal in 2010, she was asked if her father had loved her. She thought he did, she said, because she had red hair and freckles, like his mother.

But she could not forgive his cruelty to her. “He broke my life,” she said. “I want to explain to you. He broke my life.”

And he left a shadow from which she could never emerge. “Wherever I go,” she said, “here, or Switzerland, or India, or wherever. Australia. Some island. I will always be a political prisoner of my father’s name.”

NotMe
12-06-2012, 14:36
'Nursing home' is what she called it but there are many names for them(btw, Richland Center is the town's name). I would say it is a much better way to pass your final years than in a two room kvartira with no lift. There was not one member of the Stalin family who died as 'pleasantly' as she did.[/B]

As for me, I would prefer to die in a two room kvartira with no lift, but in surroundings of close people.

As for "pleasantly"- i know what you mean, but we have no idea what she felt when died in a foreign country alone.

BTW, Stalin's older son Yakov, being a soldier died as a soldier not in the fight, but with honour. For me it's more pleasant death.


'Ms. Peters was said to be enjoy sewing and reading, mainly nonfiction, choosing not to own a television set. In an interview with The Wisconsin State Journal in 2010, she was asked if her father had loved her. She thought he did, she said, because she had red hair and freckles, like his mother.

But she could not forgive his cruelty to her. “He broke my life,” she said. “I want to explain to you. He broke my life.”

And he left a shadow from which she could never emerge. “Wherever I go,” she said, “here, or Switzerland, or India, or wherever. Australia. Some island. I will always be a political prisoner of my father’s name.”

Thank you. :)

In fact, I have read her "Dvadzat' pisem k drugu" and a lot of other books about her and Stalin's life. :)

martpark
14-06-2012, 09:27
As for me, I would prefer to die in a two room kvartira with no lift, but in surroundings of close people.

As for "pleasantly"- i know what you mean, but we have no idea what she felt when died in a foreign country alone. If we're honest, she was neither in a foreign country nor alone. She lived in the US for 40 years, off and on, and it's where she chose to spend her final years. Her daughter, from her American ex-husband, is in the US too. The rest is speculation as they say.


BTW, Stalin's older son Yakov, being a soldier died as a soldier not in the fight, but with honour. For me it's more pleasant death.

Everyone's a soldier and everyone has their battles to fight. That he was abandoned by his father to die in a concentration camp is certainly not pleasant.

NotMe
14-06-2012, 11:31
If we're honest, she was neither in a foreign country nor alone. She lived in the US for 40 years, off and on, and it's where she chose to spend her final years. Her daughter, from her American ex-husband, is in the US too. The rest is speculation as they say..

They say she had very "specific" relations with both: her daugther and son and with all people who surrounded her owing to her character.




Everyone's a soldier and everyone has their battles to fight. That he was abandoned by his father to die in a concentration camp is certainly not pleasant.

Could a death be pleasant? I have a strong doubt.

martpark
14-06-2012, 13:44
They say she had very "specific" relations with both: her daugther and son and with all people who surrounded her owing to her character. A 'character' that was defined by her upbringing.
"But she could not forgive his cruelty to her. “He broke my life,” she said. “I want to explain to you. He broke my life.”


Could a death be pleasant? I have a strong doubt.

Not Me: "For me it's more pleasant death." "As for "pleasantly"- i know what you mean, but we have no idea what she felt when died in a foreign country alone."

Self doubt?

NotMe
14-06-2012, 13:58
A 'character' that was defined by her upbringing.
"But she could not forgive his cruelty to her. “He broke my life,” she said. “I want to explain to you. He broke my life.”

She is not the only one who was brought up by cruel parent(s).

Not all of them have difficult relations with their children in the future and accuse parents in cruelty and broken fate all life long.

Someone can forgive and build relations with their children and the world on the base of "opposite principle".




Not Me: "For me it's more pleasant death." "As for "pleasantly"- i know what you mean, but we have no idea what she felt when died in a foreign country alone."

Self doubt?

Sure.

antfidel
14-06-2012, 15:04
Could a death be pleasant? I have a strong doubt.

death by snu-snu