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Babygirl
09-06-2012, 12:26
Is there any ?

antfidel
09-06-2012, 13:08
Ever seen Mad Max?

mds45
09-06-2012, 13:18
Is there any ?

After Russia changes it's name to Putinaland and Vladimir changes his name to Nicholas history will repeat it's self...

Ghostly Presence
09-06-2012, 13:57
After Russia changes it's name to Putinaland and Vladimir changes his name to Nicholas history will repeat it's self...

Vladimir is way more likely to change his name to Ivan The Terrible, than to Nicholas, I am afraid....

mds45
09-06-2012, 14:01
Vladimir is way more likely to change his name to Ivan The Terrible, than to Nicholas, I am afraid....

mmmmm can't help but agree ((

mrzuzzo
09-06-2012, 14:41
What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much?

I'd say Russia has a very bright future, and very much in part of the younger generation participating in the political process and showing interest in the future of their country. Russia's economy seems to be doing pretty good as well, if you compare it to neighboring regions..

Viola
09-06-2012, 14:45
What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much?

I'd say Russia has a very bright future, and very much in part of the younger generation participating in the political process and showing interest in the future of their country. Russia's economy seems to be doing pretty good as well, if you compare it to neighboring regions..

Afghanistan...????

Jack17
09-06-2012, 14:45
What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much?

Yeah mrzuzzo, everyone complaining about Russia should spend a year in some place really terrible - like the United States. Let them spend a year there and they'll be crying to return to Russia.

Viola
09-06-2012, 14:48
Yeah mrzuzzo, everyone complaining about Russia should spend a year in some place really terrible - like the United States. Let them spend a year there and they'll be crying to return to Russia.
What's so bad about the US? Obama turned into dictator?

w.meijerink
09-06-2012, 14:56
What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much?
I think make big money, drive big cars, talk about the problems they see but doing noting to help.
The same we see here in west-europe with people from the Middle East and than i can only say what you say What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much, go home.

w.meijerink
09-06-2012, 14:58
What's so bad about the US? Obama turned into dictator?

Is Vladimir a dictator?

mds45
09-06-2012, 15:11
What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much?

I'd say Russia has a very bright future, and very much in part of the younger generation participating in the political process and showing interest in the future of their country. Russia's economy seems to be doing pretty good as well, if you compare it to neighboring regions..

Don't hate Russia , just the opposite, I do feel though that Putins version of democracy is holding the country back, I'm in business here and some of the things that go on are quite staggering !! Look how many companies pull out of here BP for instance or HSBC , Barclays etc etc - why ? because it's such a great place? or because the government make it impossible to do business if they are not involved taking a cut.

I think Russia without Putin would be a better place, I think he has a warped view Russia and I don't think he has the ability to take Russia to the next level in it's evolution.

Regarding comparissons,rather than compare to say Dagestan or Ukraine it might be better to compare Russia and Rusians with other oil rich countries and then argue that this government is doing a great job.

Babygirl
09-06-2012, 15:30
If to characterize my own country in 5 words they would be pretty simple --

Putin, Gazprom, Chaos, Hypocrisy, Deadend.

mds45
09-06-2012, 15:32
If to characterize my own country in 5 words they would be pretty simple --

Putin, Gazprom, Chaos, Hypocrisy, Deadend.

But BG you have to add a 6th - Hope..

Babygirl
09-06-2012, 15:36
Got none.

My Dad works for Gazprom. I talk to him about things sometimes.

We are all doomed with this Putin*S BS.

Doom and gloom.

For good.

mds45
09-06-2012, 15:39
Got none.

My Dad works for Gazprom. I talk to him about things sometimes.

We are all doomed with this Putin*S BS.

Doom and gloom.

For good.

Without hope there is nothing - somebody clever wrote that !!

BabyFirefly
09-06-2012, 15:45
If there's not some change in the oligarchy here and so on, Russia will eventually be screwed. These are just the good years.

andymackem
09-06-2012, 15:49
If to characterize my own country in 5 words they would be pretty simple --

Putin, Gazprom, Chaos, Hypocrisy, Deadend.

Not sure how much I agree with that. Without wishing to put on the rose-tinted spectacles (four eyes, for my double-headed eagle!), I think there are some signs of progress.

Firstly, the evidence of the last six months suggests that Russia is undergoing a political awakening that would have been unthinkable when I first came here. A new generation is growing up which is showing signs of pushing for a more open system. It's unclear how successful this will be, but I'd argue this is a positive sign. It seems that finally it is becoming possible to criticize Russia's government without this being taken as a criticism of Russia as a whole - that's a crucial step to creating a viable opposition and a multi-party political system.

Second, right or wrong, a watershed is coming. The energy-resource economic model cannot be sustained indefinitely. The current fall in oil prices (and subsequent weakening of the ruble) is another reminder of this (it's hard to imagine that any currency could be losing value against the Euro right now, and yet ...). The global financial problems won't leave Russia unscathed - economic slowdowns mean lower fuel consumption and thus fewer petrodollars. In effect, therefore, Russia is going to be pressured into greater economic diversity, which can only be a good thing in the long run.

Third, VVP. His return to the presidency may not be wholly convincing, but it does buy six years for that political consciousness I mentioned above to develop without the country collapsing into anarchy in the interim. If the opposition is capable of developing on the desire for change, there is the potential to ensure that come 2018 we will see more competitive elections than before (although there is although the risk that a genuine electoral threat will prompt a crackdown and drag the country's political development backwards). Naturally, not everyone will welcome a multi-party political system, but my personal opinion is that this will be better for any country in the long run.

As for the old challenge of 'if you don't like it, why not go home?', I think it's important to recognise that there is a difference between not liking somewhere (and thus not caring, and leaving), and liking a place while recognising that there are things which can (maybe should) be better. In everyday terms, would you expect your friend to tell you if your flies are undone, or would you prefer him to let you walk around all day while people snigger at the gaping hole in your trousers?

Tin hat on :soapbox:

robertmf
09-06-2012, 15:50
After Russia changes it's name to Putinaland and Vladimir changes his name to Nicholas history will repeat it's self...

Russia can always apply for USA Statehood ... :SwoonLoveSmiley:

Babygirl
09-06-2012, 15:50
Oligarchy is just a link of a chain.

Changes there will not lead to any major restructuring of the system.

The main problem is Vova and co.

Solutions for the next 10-20 years ( at least ) -- none.

Bottom line -- we are already screwed. Big time.

BabyFirefly
09-06-2012, 15:53
I'm including him in the oligarchy.

Also, maybe I'm just crazy, but the younger folks here just want to buy crap. Are they doing so with credit cards? Are mortgages here a big thing? I mean, look at what happened in the US not so long ago...

robertmf
09-06-2012, 16:01
I'm including him in the oligarchy.

Also, maybe I'm just crazy, but the younger folks here just want to buy crap. Are they doing so with credit cards? Are mortgages here a big thing? I mean, look at what happened in the US not so long ago...

Yes. The mortgages collapse, etc. created a cash liquidity credit crunch that is an ongoing problem.

But just remember the axiom, When the USA catches a cold, the rest of the world gets the flu.

One upshot of the mortgages collapse seems to be a change in how people perceive the holy grail of "home ownership". There seems to be a trend towards renting|leasing rather than purchasing with a mortgage. This allows for mobility (Americans average move every 5 years) without taking a mortgage bath if the assessed value drops (like now).

Russian Lad
09-06-2012, 16:05
I think the current Russian regime will collapse as soon as the oil prices drop. Russia needs an honest, maybe even ruthless, but honest dictator who does not have the ambition of enriching himself, like Peter the Great was. Oligarchs should fell trees in Siberia, oil, gas, woods, metals, coal, etc. should belong to the people, each citizen has got to be receiving a rent from those resources.
Doubt the current regime will last for long.

mrzuzzo
09-06-2012, 16:14
Russia needs an honest, maybe even ruthless, but honest dictator who does not have the ambition of enriching himself, like Peter the Great was. Oligarchs should fell trees in Siberia, oil, gas, woods, metals, coal, etc. should belong to the people, each citizen has got to be receiving a rent from those resources.

Sounds very much like Gaddafi and Libya!

w.meijerink
09-06-2012, 16:21
Sounds very much like Gaddafi and Libya!

Don't worry Nato will help you too........

robertmf
09-06-2012, 16:31
I think the current Russian regime will collapse as soon as the oil prices drop. Russia needs an honest, maybe even ruthless, but honest dictator who does not have the ambition of enriching himself, like Peter the Great was. Oligarchs should fell trees in Siberia, oil, gas, woods, metals, coal, etc. should belong to the people, each citizen has got to be receiving a rent from those resources.
Doubt the current regime will last for long.

You want moustaches back :question:

Remington
09-06-2012, 16:36
I think Russia without Putin would be a better place, I think he has a warped view Russia and I don't think he has the ability to take Russia to the next level in it's evolution.

Doubtful with all the crooked oligarchs in Duma getting richer every year from collecting bribes. All of them have one motivate... get rich and f*ck the rest. If someone replaces Putin then he'll be no different.

antfidel
09-06-2012, 16:46
Doubtful with all the crooked oligarchs in Duma getting richer every year from collecting bribes. All of them have one motivate... get rich and f*ck the rest. If someone replaces Putin then he'll be no different.

I have a theory that the only reason Lenin's body is being preserved is that when the technology is available he will be reanimated and lead the Russian people to the glorious Marxism–Leninism paradise they so truly deserve.

Remington
09-06-2012, 16:53
I have a theory that the only reason Lenin's body is being preserved is that when the technology is available he will be reanimated and lead the Russian people to the glorious Marxism–Leninism paradise they so truly deserve.

And send all the oligarchs to Gulag will be a start. :D

andymackem
09-06-2012, 16:55
One upshot of the mortgages collapse seems to be a change in how people perceive the holy grail of "home ownership". There seems to be a trend towards renting|leasing rather than purchasing with a mortgage. This allows for mobility (Americans average move every 5 years) without taking a mortgage bath if the assessed value drops (like now).


Although that pre-supposes that either people won't retire (so they can keep working to pay the rent) or someone will step in to pay their rent in old (be that their children / grandchildren, the state, a private pension scheme). And governments across the world are pushing up retirement ages as fast as the electorate will allow. I'm not looking forward to celebrating my 70th in the office!

One big comfort I draw from owning a property of my own is the knowledge that I'll always be able to put a roof over my head. The lack of mobility is an issue (although I'm doing fine letting it out at the moment), but better that than being faced with homelessness.

mds45
09-06-2012, 16:56
Doubtful with all the crooked oligarchs in Duma getting richer every year from collecting bribes. All of them have one motivate... get rich and f*ck the rest. If someone replaces Putin then he'll be no different.

I agree somewhat but this is like the gun thread, where the guys says there's so many guns already what's the point in trying to do anything, I think as a great man once said every journey starts with a single step .

Apathy will never move anything forward, I know Prokhorov would have been one of Putins puppets to a degree but he has the skills take Russia to the next level if allowed to.

robertmf
09-06-2012, 16:59
Although that pre-supposes that either people won't retire (so they can keep working to pay the rent) or someone will step in to pay their rent in old (be that their children / grandchildren, the state, a private pension scheme). And governments across the world are pushing up retirement ages as fast as the electorate will allow. I'm not looking forward to celebrating my 70th in the office!

One big comfort I draw from owning a property of my own is the knowledge that I'll always be able to put a roof over my head. The lack of mobility is an issue (although I'm doing fine letting it out at the moment), but better that than being faced with homelessness.

In a sense, it a crap shoot ;) Atleast here outside Philly the killer is school taxes.

andymackem
09-06-2012, 17:14
In a sense, it a crap shoot ;) Atleast here outside Philly the killer is school taxes.


Does one breed, in the hope that it's an investment for old age, or does one decline to breed in the hope that the savings will pay for old age. A conundrum for our times. ;)

martpark
09-06-2012, 17:36
One big comfort I draw from owning a property of my own is the knowledge that I'll always be able to put a roof over my head. The lack of mobility is an issue (although I'm doing fine letting it out at the moment), but better that than being faced with homelessness.

The problem was/is very few people own their homes, the bank does. So if the economy changes drastically, their house will be repossessed and they'll be in debt.

Moscow may avoid the problem because many people were given flats when the system changed. The hitch is greed. If owners keep asking for higher and higher prices/rent without justification and then the economy dives due to unforeseen circumstances, the owners are left with overvalued property and no one left to afford them. This was the case in Spain. Barcelona rents went up every year for more than five years and then the house of cards fell and a lot of people lost homes and the scene is not so rosy.

Bogatyr
09-06-2012, 17:41
Yeah mrzuzzo, everyone complaining about Russia should spend a year in some place really terrible - like the United States. Let them spend a year there and they'll be crying to return to Russia.

To quote the apex of political intelligence in the US: "You betcha!"

I've spent 3 weeks altogether in the US out of the last 3 years, and I always breath a sigh of relief when the plane touches down in good ol' St. Petersburg. The first time I was mildly surprised at the feeling. The second time I realized, I was coming home.

Russian Lad
09-06-2012, 17:46
I know Prokhorov would have been one of Putins puppets to a degree but he has the skills take Russia to the next level if allowed to.

What skills? You mean stealing skills? Yes, he has stolen quite a lot. He looks and sounds like a department store manager trying to sell an overpriced TV model of the last year to you.
To me, any dictator who sends oligarchs to Siberia (or to the US/the GB) and truly nationalizes natural resources and their processing facilities will do. Even if he spills too much blood. That's just my Russian mentality.:)

andymackem
09-06-2012, 18:04
The problem was/is very few people own their homes, the bank does. So if the economy changes drastically, their house will be repossessed and they'll be in debt.

Moscow may avoid the problem because many people were given flats when the system changed. The hitch is greed. If owners keep asking for higher and higher prices/rent without justification and then the economy dives due to unforeseen circumstances, the owners are left with overvalued property and no one left to afford them. This was the case in Spain. Barcelona rents went up every year for more than five years and then the house of cards fell and a lot of people lost homes and the scene is not so rosy.

I expect to be mortgage free in the next 18-24 months, all things being equal. Partly because I didn't try to over-extend my borrowing capability, and partly because I've got lucky in that my income has risen sharply while interest rates have hit rock bottom. It's certainly fair to say that the banks bear a share of the responsibility for making stupid bets on the buoyancy of the property markets in general and assuming it was an endless license to print money, but I'd argue several buyers contributed to their own downfall.

Not that this has anything much to do with the future of Russia, unless there's evidence that the same bad mortgage decisions are bubbling under the banking system here. I've no info on that either way.

robertmf
09-06-2012, 18:25
... Not that this has anything much to do with the future of Russia, unless there's evidence that the same bad mortgage decisions are bubbling under the banking system here. I've no info on that either way.

Junk bonds. The Russians need the know-how to put together sub-par mortgages to float junk bonds.

I wouldn't be surprised to learn there are Wall street types teaching them ...

:evilgrin:

Gutterball
09-06-2012, 18:42
Yeah mrzuzzo, everyone complaining about Russia should spend a year in some place really terrible - like the United States. Let them spend a year there and they'll be crying to return to Russia.


I know no less than 8 Russians who have lived in the US for more than 5 years, have a US passort but came back to Russia to live.

rusmeister
09-06-2012, 19:32
I know no less than 8 Russians who have lived in the US for more than 5 years, have a US passort but came back to Russia to live.

I can say the same. Plus, I came back here to live after a number of years here, and then several years back in the States.

Yes, there are problems here, even big ones, but I think the ones in the US are not good, either, and the spiritual ones are worse.

Put in practical terms, it doesn't matter that you have two Lexuses in your two-garage home with swimming pool, if your kids are going to a public school that tells them (officially) that there is nothing wrong with sexual activity outside marriage - shouldn't need to have to refer to same sex attraction.

Gutterball
09-06-2012, 20:06
I can say the same. Plus, I came back here to live after a number of years here, and then several years back in the States.

Yes, there are problems here, even big ones, but I think the ones in the US are not good, either, and the spiritual ones are worse.

Put in practical terms, it doesn't matter that you have two Lexuses in your two-garage home with swimming pool, if your kids are going to a public school that tells them (officially) that there is nothing wrong with sexual activity outside marriage - shouldn't need to have to refer to same sex attraction.

So you hide out here so your kids won't learn about gays and be smart enough to find out about their furture partners sexuality, I hope you done have any girls. Good thinking.

rusmeister
09-06-2012, 20:53
So you hide out here so your kids won't learn about gays and be smart enough to find out about their furture partners sexuality, I hope you done have any girls. Good thinking.

I want my kids to be smart enough to understand that these things are wrong and why. You don't seem to ask any why's, so it might not be a good use of time wasting breath - or typing effort - in such conversations.

Since you obviously don't know what my thinking is - and don't ask - you can hardly say whether it is good or not.

And while I have two girls, yes, I think I am done having them (probably). :)

Jack17
09-06-2012, 21:54
I know no less than 8 Russians who have lived in the US for more than 5 years, have a US passort but came back to Russia to live.
Well, I live in the US and would like to live at least part of the year in Russia; I love Russia, so I know how they must feel. But the simple truth is there are 10,000 native born Russians in San Diego alone, over a million in Los Angeles and more in New York. Every major US city has Russian food stores; I'm talking about places like Kansas City and Minneapolis. In fact, you can take your written test for a California driver's license in Russian. So, apparently some Russians enjoy life here. I strongly suspect there are far more Russians living in the US than there are Americans living in Russia.

mrzuzzo
10-06-2012, 01:06
Well, I live in the US and would like to live at least part of the year in Russia; I love Russia, so I know how they must feel. But the simple truth is there are 10,000 native born Russians in San Diego alone, over a million in Los Angeles and more in New York. Every major US city has Russian food stores; I'm talking about places like Kansas City and Minneapolis. In fact, you can take your written test for a California driver's license in Russian. So, apparently some Russians enjoy life here. I strongly suspect there are far more Russians living in the US than there are Americans living in Russia.

That is true, but keep in mind that "Russians" are also Ukranians, Moldovans, jews, etc etc... Russians by ethnicity but technically not real Russians.

Also, keep in mind that the Russia these people left from is not the Russia of today. Back then, it was obvious - get out, steal, or be broke. Right now luckily things have changed and people think 10 times before emigrating.

Russian Lad
10-06-2012, 03:02
Back then, it was obvious - get out, steal, or be broke. Right now luckily things have changed and people think 10 times before emigrating.
__________________

Well, in many respects things have remained the same for millions of Russians. Hence the high levels of corruption, among other problems.

robertmf
10-06-2012, 07:13
Every major US city has Russian food stores; I'm talking about places like Kansas City and Minneapolis. In fact, you can take your written test for a California driver's license in Russian.

The local bank ATM offers English and Russian (but not cash in roubles).

rusmeister
10-06-2012, 07:38
It is true that America seems like an attractive place to live,and that many more people think of going there than leaving it. I think the considerations are due to what has been traditionally unique about America - the country is the only one to have been founded on a creed, and a system of government brought, not by Asian paganism, African or American Indian tribalism, or even more enlightened Middle Eastern Muslims or Jews, but by a people whose culture had been steeped for a millennium and a half in Christian thought and worldview, though they had been heavily influenced by a great change (the so-called "Reformation") that placed individual authority to interpret truth on a pedestal for over a hundred years prior (and so the birth of individualism).

That system of government was based on an ideal, and one that was very effective for a fairly long time. Though having flaws of its own, it did give more people a real sense of self-governance and equality than the world has ever seen, and though now thoroughly corrupt, their descendants still enjoy the benefits of the fading remnants of that great experiment. Thus the immigration.

But I think it a perception that is increasingly misleading and even false that America is "better". We cannot all be parasites, running to live where other people have made it more comfortable. America cannot contain or support the population of the entire world, and all of those infrastructures would quickly fall apart if it tried to accommodate more than the 4-5% it now contains. They are groaning under the weight now of people who want to receive and not give. And almost no one considers the question of worldview - what had been largely Christian has become relativist pluralism, and few think about what it is, and what its effects are - and how tolerance sounds so good until you are called to tolerate something that you think very wrong, and how good it is that there be no discrimination, until you realize that there ARE things and ideas that ought to be discriminated against.

To cut to the chase, people need to learn to love where they are, to be patriots of their own country, to love it and desire its betterment. To run to whever life seems "better" - without consideration of different language, culture, worldview, attitude is more of an often mercenary opportunism. We can't just expect someone else to make our home and ideal conditions for us. We have to be of the mindset of making it ourselves. And that means, for the masses of Russians and others who think the solution is in that opportunistic and parasitic flight, that they need to work on the kind of change they want to see in their own country. Emigration SHOULD be exceptional. Russia is not a hopeless desert with nothing to build on.

Judge
10-06-2012, 08:56
To cut the chase a little more Rus.
"Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country."

rusmeister
10-06-2012, 08:58
To cut the chase a little more Rus.
"Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country."
Absolutely - as long as we can distinguish between a country and its government.
(Edit) But we do things for what we love, and those loves are necessarily local. Where we were born and grew up, our neighbors, family and friends., my home town. That is the essence of patriotism.

Babygirl
10-06-2012, 13:47
I grew up both in Russia and the US.


Where did I like it better ?


Ummm truly f*cking hard one !

Judge
10-06-2012, 13:55
I grew up both in Russia and the US.


Where did I like it better ?


Ummm truly f*cking hard one !

I guess it's Russia, since you're living here.:10293:

Babygirl
10-06-2012, 14:17
I guess it's Russia, since you're living here.:10293:

I live out of a suitcase.

No commitments.

For now.)

Judge
10-06-2012, 14:26
I live out of a suitcase.

No commitments.

For now.)


I understand,the size of many Russian flats can be compared to a suitcase.

Babygirl
10-06-2012, 14:43
My flats are planes, cars and hotels.

Size doesn*t really matter to me.

It*S what you do with it that matters.

Russia is a big country, huge size ... what gives ?

Exactly.

Pure Idiocy ;)

Babygirl
10-06-2012, 14:48
I used to pay 45k every month for my cute, little apartment in the center for over a year, but since I almost never lived there I decided that it was not worth it :D

Better spend this money on new shoes or something.

rusmeister
10-06-2012, 15:10
I grew up both in Russia and the US.


Where did I like it better ?


It really is hard when you become bicultural, and you really have to settle in one culture or the other. Birth family in the US, some old friends, all scattered, and raising my own family here, being part of my local community, my home is definitely now here. But neither will I give up my American citizenship. It's an inalienable part of who I am. Not the formality of the passport, but the basic makeup, the language, and my cultural heritage, and those family and friends I left behind, though the community I grew up in has vanished.

My wife, on the other hand, has it all. Most of her classmates still live in town, she still has her parents (thank God!), and if I can't go home, at least she can.

Jack17
10-06-2012, 18:14
The greatest luxury is to live everywhere; let's face it, that's what the truly wealthy do.

yakspeare
10-06-2012, 18:23
Well I am far more optimistic about Russia than almost all my Russian friends.

I quote one, a Judge and party member of ER:

" Without spending on hospitals,schools and roads. Russia will fall apart and soon. Personally I think one day Russia willjust be the name of one big highway that delivers goods from China to Europe"

Can't get any more pessimistic than that.

DavidB
10-06-2012, 18:27
The greatest luxury is to live everywhere; let's face it, that's what the truly wealthy do.

But they have other problems, like the lack of privacy. I know a billionaire who spends a lot of his time doing simple things like travel arrangements and banking in an extremely complicated way to protect his privacy. I've learnt a lot from him. A casual observer would never pick him as a billionaire, but he's on another level in conversation. It's a completely different mentality.

Gutterball
10-06-2012, 18:46
But they have other problems, like the lack of privacy. I know a billionaire who spends a lot of his time doing simple things like travel arrangements and banking in an extremely complicated way to protect his privacy. I've learnt a lot from him. A casual observer would never pick him as a billionaire, but he's on another level in conversation. It's a completely different mentality.



The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

w.meijerink
10-06-2012, 19:18
The greatest luxury is to live everywhere; let's face it, that's what the truly wealthy do.

Yes your right Jack it is a luxury that we can do it.

Jack17
10-06-2012, 20:20
But they have other problems, like the lack of privacy. I know a billionaire who spends a lot of his time doing simple things like travel arrangements and banking in an extremely complicated way to protect his privacy. I've learnt a lot from him. A casual observer would never pick him as a billionaire, but he's on another level in conversation. It's a completely different mentality.
David, a very good point you make. I never meant to imply that anyone's life is trouble free; nevertheless, let's face it, if you had a choice to be rich or poor which would you chose?

My favorite example is the late Princess Diana. She had youth, beauty, position, wealth, two beautiful children, really everything one could ask of some genie in a lamp. Yet, she was unhappy during much of her life. OK, you can say she married the wrong man; but when did British Royalty ever let a thing like marriage bar them from being with whomever they wanted? No, life is hard for everyone; I just think it's generally harder if you're poor.

Jack17
10-06-2012, 20:31
Well I am far more optimistic about Russia than almost all my Russian friends.

I quote one, a Judge and party member of ER:

" Without spending on hospitals,schools and roads. Russia will fall apart and soon. Personally I think one day Russia willjust be the name of one big highway that delivers goods from China to Europe"

Can't get any more pessimistic than that.
This is really a huge question. On paper with more land, natural resources and a highly intelligent population than any other country, Russia should be the most prosperous nation on earth; yet . . .

Edinia Rossia is just a perpetuation of a thousand years of Russian autocracy. I think it would take a cataclysmic event like WWI to dislodge the current rulers. But even then, you're only likely to get another Lenin and Stalin, that is, more autocracy.

The only hopeful signs I see are bright people like KG and RL who understand the importance of liberal democratic institutions to a prosperous economy and social structure. I just fear they are a minority of Russians.

w.meijerink
10-06-2012, 20:44
David, a very good point you make. I never meant to imply that anyone's life is trouble free; nevertheless, let's face it, if you had a choice to be rich or poor which would you chose?

My favorite example is the late Princess Diana. She had youth, beauty, position, wealth, two beautiful children, really everything one could ask of some genie in a lamp. Yet, she was unhappy during much of her life. OK, you can say she married the wrong man; but when did British Royalty ever let a thing like marriage bar them from being with whomever they wanted? No, life is hard for everyone; I just think it's generally harder if you're poor.

Live is what you make from it, you can sit in the corner and cry or standup and put yourself together and take live like it is.

Gutterball
10-06-2012, 22:09
Well, I live in the US and would like to live at least part of the year in Russia; I love Russia, so I know how they must feel. But the simple truth is there are 10,000 native born Russians in San Diego alone, over a million in Los Angeles and more in New York. Every major US city has Russian food stores; I'm talking about places like Kansas City and Minneapolis. In fact, you can take your written test for a California driver's license in Russian. So, apparently some Russians enjoy life here. I strongly suspect there are far more Russians living in the US than there are Americans living in Russia.

I was thinking more about quality not quanitity

NotMe
11-06-2012, 15:09
Live is what you make from it, you can sit in the corner and cry or standup and put yourself together and take live like it is.

Exactly. :)

I didn't expect anything different from a person who likes to win alps. ;)

LondonYvonne
11-06-2012, 22:40
Is there any ?

Doesn't that depend on you and your generation? How would you like the future of Russia to be?

w.meijerink
12-06-2012, 00:19
Exactly. :)

I didn't expect anything different from a person who likes to win alps. ;)
When you know your limit it will be no problem at all, but when you are in the alps and think of the himalaya after 50 m you will go back take a plane to fly and when you see the himalaya you will think no it's not possible and just look to the mountain and make a photo.

scd167
12-06-2012, 11:57
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/citizenship-sale-foreign-investors-flock-092400861.html

sashadidi
12-06-2012, 12:22
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/citizenship-sale-foreign-investors-flock-092400861.html

Same in New Zealand, Kim Dotcom (megaupload fame)got in by buying 10 million of government bonds which seemd to help to "overturn" his criminal record, any ordinary Joe would have NOT got a look in , he of one of many here so its the same everywhere.


Link:http://joan-druett.blogspot.co.nz/2012/05/kim-dotcom-and-campaign-financing.html
The case has developed hitches. Dotcom is a New Zealand citizen, having qualified, it seems, after spending ten million (local dollars) on Government Bonds. A large part of the stash confiscated during the raid had nothing whatsoever to do with the case. Dotcom's lawyers are busily getting it back.

But didn't Oleg Deripaska have problem getting to the USA, not sure if they were resolved?

carly
15-06-2012, 17:16
I think make big money, drive big cars, talk about the problems they see but doing noting to help.
The same we see here in west-europe with people from the Middle East and than i can only say what you say What are you guys doing here if you hate it here so much, go home. leave middle easterners alone! You're confusing us with other groups. Wait, the only thing I moan about is the disillisionement of landing a good job after uni. I felt like higher education was sold to me...