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View Full Version : Relocating to Moscow - advice re schools is needed!



kara123
02-10-2007, 17:28
Hi all, we are about to move to Moscow and have a major dilemma! We need to find a school for our 8-year old son but we also want to live in the centre (within Sadovoye koltso). I understand traffic is a problem and he may have to spend up to 2 hrs each way if we enrol him in one of international schools on the outskirts. Does anyone know of any good english school in the centre or close to the centre? Grateful for any information!

Pobman
02-10-2007, 17:57
In a car from Metro University, which is Red line south, is 30 minutes in the morning and 50 minutes in the evening to the Anglo American school.

kara123
02-10-2007, 18:11
Thanks so much for your reply. We are thinking about staying around Arbat or Tverskay and have him travel by car... I've been told it's about 2 hrs each way from there, it that right? What about British and International schools, or the English International School near Novogireevo? Thanks again!

Pobman
02-10-2007, 18:19
Other schools I dont know about, but I would have thought Arbat and Tverskaya would be quicker as they are nearer, but I could be wrong. I cant see it taking 2 hours, though there will be days when is does as some days for no reason traffic is 10x worse than normal.

You could go out of the city a little, to say Sokol, its a very short trip in to the city for work and closer to the school by a long margin. Also it seems a bit cleaner than the city with a few nice green areas. In the mornings (before 8am) a drive from Sokol to Park Kultura (a little past Arbat) is less than 20 minutes.

kara123
02-10-2007, 19:51
Pobman - thank you very much, your response is tremendously helpful!

Bels
02-10-2007, 20:40
Hi all, we are about to move to Moscow and have a major dilemma! We need to find a school for our 8-year old son but we also want to live in the centre (within Sadovoye koltso). I understand traffic is a problem and he may have to spend up to 2 hrs each way if we enrol him in one of international schools on the outskirts. Does anyone know of any good english school in the centre or close to the centre? Grateful for any information!

May I ask why you find it so necessary for your child to go to an international school rather than let's say a good GYMNASIUM Russian school where they are heavily regulated by government to reach a good standard and that the international schools can pop up where and when they like without being regulated by any force? May I also ask which nationality of International school you are looking for. British or American.

Pobman
02-10-2007, 21:50
One thing to note is you might find the Anglo American school is full, and thus you cant get in there anyway. That seems to depend on age group and luck, somebody else will know better about that I am sure. Though your best bet would be to ask the school direct.

I really know nothing about other schools.

pobjob
03-10-2007, 04:41
May I ask why you find it so necessary for your child to go to an international school rather than let's say a good GYMNASIUM Russian school where they are heavily regulated by government to reach a good standard and that the international schools can pop up where and when they like without being regulated by any force? May I also ask which nationality of International school you are looking for. British or American.

You mean it's not obvious why you would pick an International school over a Russian gymnasium school if you are a foreigner... I guess a school giving an International Baccalaureate diploma with all exams externally graded, for example, is not regulated by any force...

markusha
03-10-2007, 08:28
For an 8 year old in an international school, your choices are the Anglo American (mainly American, excellent facilities and full), English International (spaces, good reports, but very far) and International School of Moscow (spaces, excellent all round (my child is there), not as far out as the other two). Oh, and the British International School which has several sites but has terrible management. Living in the centre, you would be driving against the traffic and all have school buses, so 2 hours is an exageration except on grid-lock days. All have web-sites to look at.

Russian schools - look at recent discussions on Redtape and this site. If your child doesn't speak Russian it will be miserable for him. A private school may well take a non-Russian speaker, but their quality of education/facilities is generally low. I believe there are some very good state schools within the Garden Ring, and you could choose to live within their catchment areas, but again language could be a problem.

Please PM me if you want more info.

SalTheReturn
03-10-2007, 11:06
For an 8 year old in an international school, your choices are the Anglo American (mainly American, excellent facilities and full), English International (spaces, good reports, but very far) and International School of Moscow (spaces, excellent all round (my child is there), not as far out as the other two). Oh, and the British International School which has several sites but has terrible management. Living in the centre, you would be driving against the traffic and all have school buses, so 2 hours is an exageration except on grid-lock days. All have web-sites to look at.

Russian schools - look at recent discussions on Redtape and this site. If your child doesn't speak Russian it will be miserable for him. A private school may well take a non-Russian speaker, but their quality of education/facilities is generally low. I believe there are some very good state schools within the Garden Ring, and you could choose to live within their catchment areas, but again language could be a problem.

Please PM me if you want more info.

apparently even some tremendous shooting occured at some points at the british international school

tremendous, because despite no one died (excpet maybe the driver of the oligarch's daughter), shooting occured when the school was opening its gates and lots of kids were there

did anyone know about that?

markusha
03-10-2007, 12:46
Yes, but it was all hushed up at the time - so you might say not an entirely ineffective management. And it did give BIS an excuse to exclude parents even more from school life.

aarden
03-10-2007, 21:15
I'm due to relocate soon as well. I've visited the ISM, BIS and EIS. Of the three I chose EIS, mainly because the headmaster impressed me so much. The facilities look great and I've been PMing a lady who has a daughter there who is thrilled with the school, confirming what I thought. She lives in Zamoskvorechie and says it takes about 40 mins for her child to get home. She recommended Taganskaya, Kitay Gorod and the south of Chistye Prudy as places to live if your child went there. Anglo-Americain definitely full. ISM was next choice but it worried me that the head couldn't remember my child's name after 3 or 4 corrections!
British school No 2 was horrible and I hear lots of people have moved from there to other schools.
Hope this helps

Jax
04-10-2007, 12:03
Hi

I Live on the Garden Ring (Sadovaya - Spaskaya) and my son attends EIS in Novigoreevo. He leaves for school at 7.30am and is always at school before or at 8.00am. In the afternoon (school finishes 3.30pm) he is usually home by 4.30pm. He has only been late once and he was still home by5pm - Hope this helps - Einglish International School is a great school with a fantastic atmosphere!

DollyTa
04-10-2007, 19:48
hi,

our son (7yrs) goes to EIS as well and he seems happy. he says he likes the school.

we have been there a few times for the formalities/queries, and were given full attention.

infact, what i liked was also the fact that they took the trouble to ask us and clarify how our son's name was pronounced after his few initial days in the school.

its far no doubt, but easily accessible by metro (5 mins walk from metro station). he takes the school bus and gets to the center (park kultury) within 1 - 1.5 hrs on his return in the evening. mornings - the bus picks him up by 7.35.

hope this helps.
ta

Bels
04-10-2007, 20:56
I still have my doubts. They took the trouble to ask how his name is pronounced. So what. I assume that you are going to this expense so that your child will have a regulated education that will meet the standards if the child goes to or goes back to UK. Will that child be able to pess his/her O levels at the age of sixteen? Are allt the teachers fully qualified with plenty of experience in the British National Curriculum? Do they all have PGCE. Thes teachers are very expensive in salary and then need to pursuaded to come to Moscow. In fact my guess is that they are more expensive than American teachers. Who regulates them?

Bels
04-10-2007, 21:11
Hi

I Live on the Garden Ring (Sadovaya - Spaskaya) and my son attends EIS in Novigoreevo. He leaves for school at 7.30am and is always at school before or at 8.00am. In the afternoon (school finishes 3.30pm) he is usually home by 4.30pm. He has only been late once and he was still home by5pm - Hope this helps - Einglish International School is a great school with a fantastic atmosphere!

What investigations did you make to ensure your child will get a good standard of education.

MissAnnElk
04-01-2008, 08:29
We just moved here from Bratislava. As Amrican expats with a decent salary but no tuition benefit, we put our kids in the French school there. Spouse speaks it fluently. I muddle through.

Yes, it was a challenge for the children at the beginning, but it seemed everyone else's kids were bilingual except ours (we did not have confidence in the SK elementary schools and weren't so interested in the language . . . only other choices were Hungarian, Bulgarian, and later German . . . so this was what we picked). The American and British schools there were prohibitively expensive (I even homeschooled for one year because of that . . . but even with a grad degree, I felt unqualified).

First child went into second grade with the ability to count in French and nothing else. Spouse worked with her every weekend for first six months. Second child went into kindergarten, which was much less formal. Both were functioning just fine after three months and doing great after 6. Oldest child was scoring tops in the class in French grammar the past two years . . .

No one had Sunday night depression, stomach aches, anything else that might indicate stress. The teachers were wonderful. They are enrolled in the French school here because they were part of the system, so acceptance was automatic . . . I understand there is a waiting list here depending on one's circumstances.

Will they attend American universities some day? Dunno.

Will they be able to find employment in the EU as American citizens? Dunno.

Time will tell.

Schools are extremely personal things and what works for me may not work for you. But think outside the box and sometimes you find a great solution.

SalTheReturn
04-01-2008, 12:24
We just moved here from Bratislava. As Amrican expats with a decent salary but no tuition benefit, we put our kids in the French school there. Spouse speaks it fluently. I muddle through.

Yes, it was a challenge for the children at the beginning, but it seemed everyone else's kids were bilingual except ours (we did not have confidence in the SK elementary schools and weren't so interested in the language . . . only other choices were Hungarian, Bulgarian, and later German . . . so this was what we picked). The American and British schools there were prohibitively expensive (I even homeschooled for one year because of that . . . but even with a grad degree, I felt unqualified).

First child went into second grade with the ability to count in French and nothing else. Spouse worked with her every weekend for first six months. Second child went into kindergarten, which was much less formal. Both were functioning just fine after three months and doing great after 6. Oldest child was scoring tops in the class in French grammar the past two years . . .

No one had Sunday night depression, stomach aches, anything else that might indicate stress. The teachers were wonderful. They are enrolled in the French school here because they were part of the system, so acceptance was automatic . . . I understand there is a waiting list here depending on one's circumstances.

Will they attend American universities some day? Dunno.

Will they be able to find employment in the EU as American citizens? Dunno.

Time will tell.

Schools are extremely personal things and what works for me may not work for you. But think outside the box and sometimes you find a great solution.

Can I ask how much was the rates' difference between French and BIS?
What schocked me most about BIS is to see how parents regularly gets letters where, for one reason or another, are asked extra payments.
Of course for them it is not big deal...

solnishko
04-01-2008, 13:06
British International School (http://www.bismoscow.com/)

English International School (http://www.englishedmoscow.com/index_rus.html)

International School of Moscow (http://www.internationalschool.ru/)

Rosinka (http://www.rosinka.ru/eng/school.html)

Indian School
Bol. Dorogomilovskaya ul., 10/2
At the embassy of India, for children of diplomats and businessmen. Education in English, intensive studies of liberal arts and mathematics starting from 10th grade.
Tel.:+7 (495) 240-6437
+7 (495) 917-0820

Indonesian School
Novokuznetskaya ul., 12
1-10 grades, private school by the embassy, education in Indonesian.
Tel.: +7 (495) 951-9550

Luchik (http://www.lychik.ru/)

Iranian School
Pokrovskiy bulv., 7
1-9 grades by the embassy of Iran, education in Persian.
Tel.: +7 (495) 917-3092

Italian School
Leninsky prosp. 78A
1-8 grades; education in Italian according the state educational program of Italy, kindergarten.
Tel.: +7 (495) 131-8700
131-8756

Japanese School
Leninskiy prosp., 78
Education on Japanese for children of embassy staff, 1-9 grades.
Tel.: +7 (495) 131-8733

Korean School
Vvedenskogo ul., 32a
At the embassy of Korea for children of embassy staff.
Tel.: +7 (495) 420-2377

Korean school # 1086
Vvedenskogo ul., 32a
Russian-Korean school Study of choreography, English, Korean languages, liberal arts, Korean cuisine.
Tel.: +7 (495) 335-8028
Fax: +7 (495) 231-1702

Lithuanian Shaltinelis School 1247

Gospitalnyy per., 3
Russian-Lithuanian school Study of Lithuanian language and culture, English studies from the 1st grade.
Tel.: +7 (495) 267-7536
Fax: +7 (495) 267-2881

Anglo American School (http://www.aas.ru/)

Polish School
Bol. Tishinsky per. 1
At the embassy of Poland.
Tel.: +7 (495) 231-1701
231-1702

Bulgarian School
Mosfilmovskaya ul., 66
Education in Bulgarian.
Tel.: +7 (495) 143-6245

Swedish School / Svenska Skolan
Leninsky Prospekt d.78a
Välkommen till Svenska skolan i Moskva! (http://www.sveskolmoskva.com)
Private school by the embassy, 1-12 grades, education in Swedish, English and Russian as foreign languages, admission from the age of 6, for children of embassy employees and businessmen only.
Tel.: +7 (495) 980-5049
775-3977

Deutsche Schule Moskau
Vernadskogo prosp., 103, bld. 5
Deutsche Schule Moskau (http://www.deutscheschulemoskau.de/)
Private school by the embassy of Germany, 1-12 grades, education in German.
Tel.: +7 (495) 433-4111

Hinkson Christian Academy
131000, Varshavskoye Shosse 37
Hinkson Christian Academy (http://www.hinkson.ru)
Elementary and secondary school that primarily provides education for the children of Christian missionaries and other Christians working in Moscow.
Tel.: +7 (495) 733-9740
Fax.: +7 (495) 733-9062

Finnish School
119261 Leninsky prospekt 78A
Kindergardern and school 1-9 grades, Education in Finnish.
Moskovan suomalainen peruskoulu (http://www.finnschoolmoscow.com)
Tel.: +7 (495) 514-1820

Slavic-Anglo-American School “Marina”
Panferov street, 6, str. 2
Welcome to SAAS "Marina" (http://www.saasmar.ru)
Russian-English elementary, middle and high schools
Tel.: +7 (495) 134-5035
Fax.: +7 (495) 134-1547

French School Lycee Français
Milioutinsky pereulok, 7a
Lycée Français de Moscou Alexandre Dumas] (http://www.lfm.ru)
Tel.: +7 (495) 514-1546
Tel.: +7 (495) 980-5099
Kindergarden
1st Spasonalivkovsky lane., 12/16
Tel.: +7 (495) 237-4636
450-3447
Fax: +7 (495) 237-8959

SalTheReturn
04-01-2008, 14:15
thanks a lot for your info Bels, really


yes there is an italian in moscow and thats acceptable since there are quite many italian businessmen based in moscow and hooked up with russian hotties building families. the school is officially recognized by our national ministry of education despite only FEW people are hired through ministerial contracts. the rest are kinda freelancer.

but when there i could not avoid to notice the japanese and the finnish school as well...WHY THE HELL MOSCOW NEEDS A FINNISH SCHOOL? To be honest it was the first time i was hearing of a finnish school...how comes such a small country has its own school?

what are the reasons why a government decided to fund such schools?

TD
04-01-2008, 14:16
thanks for the list Solnishka - I have copied this into a sticky thread

Bels
04-01-2008, 14:32
There you go sal, A Finnish, an Indian school, and an Italian school altogether wthin the list. And I bet they all make money.

I might look into this, it looks good business, how about a third British International school.

SalTheReturn
04-01-2008, 15:31
There you go sal, A Finnish, an Indian school, and an Italian school altogether wthin the list. And I bet they all make money.

I might look into this, it looks good business, how about a third British International school.

no i dont think they make money thats why i see no point...why are they open?
how many pupils can have the finnish school in moscow?

will find out about how many pupils are at the italian school

Bels
04-01-2008, 16:27
I do believe the American school is funded by some authority. However the British schools are purely profiteering out to make big bucks, there is no backing from British Authorities whatsoever. Even the the British Council won't comment.

TD
04-01-2008, 16:42
I do believe the American school is funded by some authority

from their site (http://www.aas.ru/about.cfm): "The Anglo-American School is chartered by the American, British, and Canadian Embassies in Moscow through the aegis of a School Board"

nevertheless I am sure that the AAS is NOT a non-profit venture....

Bels
04-01-2008, 17:16
Interesting, I wonder if the British Embassy endorses any of the British Intermational schools here in Moscow in any form. Because if they do, it would increase my confidence in whether to send my children there or not. But for the time being I'm sticking to selected Russian schools.

Just the fact that they will be bi-lingual is one big plus for their future in Britain. And I have more faith in maths and Science in these schools.

SalTheReturn
04-01-2008, 20:56
whats interesting is that i would assume, when paying well over 20.000bucks a year, that my kids are not trained by TEFL teacher but by people with pedagogical backgrounds

i might be wrong but i know at least one guy who after escaping the BKC world he entered the BIS as a language teacher for kids

now he was surely a good teacher but i saw how and where he achieved his qualification: in prague in less than a month and getting drunk at weekends

my 2 cents

Bels
04-01-2008, 21:08
I'm not knocking any international school on this one. There's no doubt the child will be taught through English and they must reach a good standard before they are allowed to enroll, that's the way it is, they are not there to teach English as a second or foreign language, and they are probably not qualified to do so.

These International schools are designed for English speaking natives. British school teachers will be fully qualified with a PGCE and familiar with the British National Curriculum, that's a must under British law for schools in the UK. But they are not trained to teach EFL or ESL.

SalTheReturn
04-01-2008, 23:25
I'm not knocking any international school on this one. There's no doubt the child will be taught through English and they must reach a good standard before they are allowed to enroll, that's the way it is, they are not there to teach English as a second or foreign language, and they are probably not qualified to do so.

These International schools are designed for English speaking natives. British school teachers will be fully qualified with a PGCE and familiar with the British National Curriculum, that's a must under British law for schools in the UK. But they are not trained to teach EFL or ESL.

i was saying the opposite Bels, that for 20K a year i would expet my teacher to have a degree achieved in the UK and not a TELF online certificate

thva
04-01-2008, 23:27
from their site (http://www.aas.ru/about.cfm): "The Anglo-American School is chartered by the American, British, and Canadian Embassies in Moscow through the aegis of a School Board"

nevertheless I am sure that the AAS is NOT a non-profit venture....

I'm curious why you think so:
whatever else you may think about the AAS, they at least claim to be non-profit - see their website - About Us (http://www.aas.ru/about.cfm?subpage=18) -
if you think that they are for-profit, who do you imagine are getting the profit, the local ambassadors?

TD
04-01-2008, 23:33
I'm curious why you think so:
whatever else you may think about the AAS, they at least claim to be non-profit - see their website -

I stand corrected on the non-profit question, although I don't see how it would impact whether it is a good school or not - for that I would suggest speaking with folks who have had children studying there for a year or so. It may be a non-profit, but they must bring in quite a bit of money considering the fees are $20k-$40k/year (anyone know exactly what the tuition is now?)

MissAnnElk
05-01-2008, 00:13
Can I ask how much was the rates' difference between French and BIS?
What schocked me most about BIS is to see how parents regularly gets letters where, for one reason or another, are asked extra payments.
Of course for them it is not big deal...


In B'lava BIS was about $10,000/year and the French school was about 4000 Euro/year. French school here is the same price (for our age group . . . high school costs more).

MissAnnElk
05-01-2008, 00:16
no i dont think they make money thats why i see no point...why are they open?


Might receive government subsidies . . . I'd bet that many do.

Bels
06-01-2008, 18:50
i was saying the opposite Bels, that for 20K a year i would expet my teacher to have a degree achieved in the UK and not a TELF online certificate

Sorry Sal, they can get a lot more :) £400 a week in the UK is peanuts, and almost impossible to live in London. An online TEFL is now unacceptable in the UK.

For the EFL teacher, preferably a degree plus a CELTA or TRINITY. An online certificate would be unacceptible in the UK. Typical earnings £15 an hour, £30,000

For the State school teacher, a good relevent degree plus a PGCE. This is a post graduate qualification. Income and most certainly the terms are much better for state school teachers.

Pyotr
06-01-2008, 23:09
Sorry Sal, they can get a lot more :) £400 a week in the UK is peanuts, and almost impossible to live in London. An online TEFL is now unacceptable in the UK.

For the EFL teacher, preferably a degree plus a CELTA or TRINITY. An online certificate would be unacceptible in the UK. Typical earnings £15 an hour, £30,000

For the State school teacher, a good relevent degree plus a PGCE. This is a post graduate qualification. Income and most certainly the terms are much better for state school teachers.

I think the point is that the schools charge 20K+ a year per student. I'm sure the teachers are more decently paid.

Bels
06-01-2008, 23:39
Got you, so is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ? And yes for a British International School I would expect all teachers to have experience of the British National curriculum, and hold a post graduate teachers qualification, in other words a PGCE. And I would want to see them.

Pyotr
07-01-2008, 02:22
Got you, so is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ? And yes for a British International School I would expect all teachers to have experience of the British National curriculum, and hold a post graduate teachers qualification, in other words a PGCE. And I would want to see them.

A man of my blood: "is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ?"

Sure hope you don't teach mathematics or economics, man!

Or English, for that matter!

Ha ha! Let's talk in the morning...

SalTheReturn
07-01-2008, 09:30
A man of my blood: "is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ?"

Sure hope you don't teach mathematics or economics, man!

Or English, for that matter!

Ha ha! Let's talk in the morning...

:duhhhh::duhhhh::duhhhh::duhhhh::duhhhh::duhhhh:

ages i wonder whats up(wrong) with Bels...:sick:

Bels
07-01-2008, 13:09
A man of my blood: "is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ?"

Sure hope you don't teach mathematics or economics, man!

Or English, for that matter!

Ha ha! Let's talk in the morning...

Let's talk. We can start off by being more specific. Sal, I got the flu, most of the time I'm in bed. Thank goodness I'm not working this week.

Bels
07-01-2008, 13:36
Got you, so is it 20k in dollars, ££££s, or dollars ? And yes for a British International School I would expect all teachers to have experience of the British National curriculum, and hold a post graduate teachers qualification, in other words a PGCE. And I would want to see them.

OOPS! I meant dollars, £££s or Euros.

ATO1980
08-01-2008, 11:54
I have heard many a bad thing about the AAS, from parents. The education there will set your children back a year or two if you ever wish to go back to the United States.

Send them to British Int'l School. They will get a solid education there.

Just FYI: I'm American.

Bels
08-01-2008, 13:08
I have heard many a bad thing about the AAS, from parents. The education there will set your children back a year or two if you ever wish to go back to the United States.

Send them to British Int'l School. They will get a solid education there.

Just FYI: I'm American.

Well yes, send them to Britain for a solid education where the schools and curriculum are controlled and regulated by the control of the British government. I can't find any body that controls or endorses those BIS in Russia. At least the AAS has been endorsed by English speaking Embassies here. And I'm British by the way. If I could get my kids into the AAS I would, as it appears to have the highest reputation here. Problem is the waiting list is impossible.

SalTheReturn
08-01-2008, 15:03
Well yes, send them to Britain for a solid education where the schools and curriculum are controlled and regulated by the control of the British government. I can't find any body that controls or endorses those BIS in Russia. At least the AAS has been endorsed by English speaking Embassies here. And I'm British by the way. If I could get my kids into the AAS I would, as it appears to have the highest reputation here. Problem is the waiting list is impossible.

and who exactly told you that the AAS has the best rep in moscow? LOL LOL

Bels
08-01-2008, 15:10
and who exactly told you that the AAS has the best rep in moscow? LOL LOL

TD, the administrater :) Read again sal. I can't find anything solid for the british schools. And you know how pro-British I am. It's a shame really, some British goverment sponsors would be good here. And let them have control of these schools at the same time.

I think the French Goverment sponsors education of French schools and culture here.

katsa
10-01-2008, 01:00
I thought that the BIS just reinvested into its schools, and has just opened up a new school in Profsoyuznaya. The opening was attended by the Consul General of the UK Embassy and by Cambridge Education (who evaluate the school and are one of the providers of school Inspections in the UK). And its IB Diploma results (100% pass) and 85% pass at IGCSE would beat most international schools in the world (including all the international schools in Moscow hands down - the AAS doesn't even publish its fees or results). So much for comments on BIS poor management and ill informed profiteerring remarks. By the way, I am a parent who is open minded.

hka
10-01-2008, 11:35
Sorry, accidentally deleted

Reverend
15-01-2008, 11:40
and who exactly told you that the AAS has the best rep in moscow? LOL LOL If you look at the long waiting list you can certainly agree that it is the most POPULAR school. If you look at the universities the graduates are admitted to (outside of Russia) you would certainly agree that it is the most successful in placing its students into good universities.

The British Schools were run (in partnership) by a British organization operating schools worldwide (Nord Anglia). They were taken over by the Russian partners several years ago - this was discussed here. They would not be nearly so popular if there was sufficient space at AAS.

The French School is a bargain with a recognized government curriculum and the French government pays for many of the teachers - keeping the costs down.

MissAnnElk
15-01-2008, 16:45
The French School is a bargain with a recognized government curriculum and the French government pays for many of the teachers - keeping the costs down.

Oui! It works for us.

Freemanster
30-01-2008, 21:04
I've known a number of parents and a few teachers at different international schools around Moscow for years, so here's my observations (put together with some assistance). Hope some people find it useful making decisions



AAS
By reputation a good school with top facilities. Long waiting list and strict about who they let in (fairly sure student applicants must already speak English). It is a non profit organization that exists due to financial support from the US, Canadian and British Embassies. Seems the reason for it's existence is to support the expansion of business here (families had to have a place to send their kids and AAS was one of the first in town for such folks). Teachers must usually come from Canada, US or Britain as a result of embassy involvement.

Many large corporations here pay to reserve places at the school so that they can always guarantee the children of new employees a place. The campus is rumored to be worth US$50 000 000 of investment - as I mentioned, I believe most of this investment came from governments/embassies.

This school seems to be a good option for people in the north if you can get your child in.


British International School of Moscow
Had originally established a reputation as a solid alternative option to AAS, but in recent years its top management practices are said to have been extremely poor. Many parents are less than happy with the current unstable atmosphere and there is the feeling that BIS' falling reputation has helped fuel the growth of other international schools in Moscow.

BIS do have a new campus in Profsoyuznaya and it is said to be quite impressive. Most campuses though look very average compared to Russian state schools nearby.

The school used to be associated with Nord Anglia - a British company operating schools around the world - but I'm not sure who owns/controls the school now. BIS seems to have a low percentage of British or native English speaking children attending the school and most native speaking, (and indeed non-native speaking) families I know are actively looking for other options.


English International School
One of the new kids on the block, the school appears to have reasonable facilities and is building an excellent word-of-mouth reputation from those whose children attend. The main thing to note is the location, which is on the east side of Moscow.

Interestingly, two members of staff represent a pair of the highly regarded staff members who were rumored to have been pushed to leave BIS after they tried to change poor management practices there. In any case, by reputation these two are highly competent, experienced and personable individuals. This school seems like a very good choice if you can arrange good transport or if you calculate that the trip is fine for you.

International School of Moscow
The other new kid on the block. Every parent I've met seems to be very pleased with the way things are going so far at this place. I've also heard that the British team leading the school are very enthusiastic and personable. This school is part of a company that has set up reputable schools in several locations across China.

The school has good buildings that are well decked out. The school also makes use of nearby buildings that are part of some new Russian Olympic Sports facility I think. Sport buildings there look very modern anyway. The school has experienced very fast growth and is in a good location for many expat parents I think. Classes go from pre-nursery (2 years old) up to year 6 and it has plans to add year 7 next year and will continue to expand upwards after that. Can't confirm how high they will offer eventually. They give preference to native English speakers, though they do not necessarily exclude others (especially if they are still in younger grades). Convenient new bridge links to Serebyani Bor and North Purple line area.

This school seems like a very good choice for people living in the Center/North/West.

Well, that's about it. Hope it's helpful to people making decisions. Sorry I don't know too many people associated with other schools, so can't give informed opinion.

Bels
30-01-2008, 21:23
Apart from heresay, are there any other ways we can check the qaulity of these schools. To ensure such area as are all the teachers properly qualified to teach the National Curriculum, do they all have several years experience teaching in the Uk with a PGCE ? It's all very nice saying saying that some kids and parents saying it's a very nice school, but are they going to match up to to National curriculum if they go to the USA.

How about GCSE O and A levels, what's their record of achievements. Is their any independant official bodies from the UK checking up on their standards. Does the British Embassy or The British Coucil endorse them. Let's not forget that high fees are being paid.

Bels
30-01-2008, 21:27
Oui! It works for us.

Nice to hear of schools subsidised schools from France. It's a shame Britain doesn't do the same. As a matter of interest, is everything taught in native French, and do they teach quality English for British Natives as well as French.

Must they be native French?

Bels
30-01-2008, 21:33
Nice to hear of schools subsidised schools from France. It's a shame Britain doesn't do the same. As a matter of interest, is everything taught in native French, and do they teach quality English for British Natives as well as French.

Must they be native French?

Problem is if that their was a British school subsided and controlled from the British government Russia would want to throw them out on the next political argument :)

Freemanster
03-02-2008, 14:48
Problem is if that their was a British school subsided and controlled from the British government Russia would want to throw them out on the next political argument :)

Firstly, Britain does subsidise (I assume you didn't mean 'subsided') a school here. It's AAS and it was originally set up as a result of coordinated efforts between the British, Canadian and American embassies here. Class teachers there are only supposed to come from those countries as a result. So far I don't know that the school has ever suffered as a result of political disagreements.

Freemanster
03-02-2008, 15:02
Apart from heresay, are there any other ways we can check the qaulity of these schools...
...are they going to match up to to National curriculum if they go to the USA.
...Does the British Embassy or The British Coucil endorse them. Let's not forget that high fees are being paid.

Yes, there is. All the British curriculum schools give standardised SATS tests that 'level' each pupil's achievements according to required British standards. This provides the parent with accurate information regarding how their child is doing compared to the official British standards.

This however is unrelated to the American curriculum except in the case of AAS. In fact, unless I'm mistaken - and I may be - there is no 'National Curriculum' in the USA. The syllabus there is state controlled.

With regards to British Council endorsement, I know that staff from the embassy have been present at official functions in most of the British curriculum schools. As a general rule however, I strongly doubt any embassy is allowed to officially endorse a private business regardless of how much money they charge.

Incidentally, most of my info is from far more reliable sources than 'heresay' but I would rather err on the side of caution in these litigious days.

fco1922
17-02-2008, 03:07
As a former school governor in England, I would just like to point out that the National Curriculum is NOT mandated by law in England and Wales. It is the recommended curriculum but some schools have opted to offer the IB or other variations instead.

The National Curriculum is also the recommended curriculum ONLY for state schools. The independent sector generally does not follow is slavishly. Rather, independent primaries tend to focus on Common Entrance.

Finally, the Anglo-American School is the only school in Moscow that was formally and officially sponsored by the Embassies of the UK, US and Canada. They helped establish it and the AAS Board is dominated by Embassy representatives. The AAS teaches the International Baccalaureate at all grade levels albeit it offers American AP courses in the high school as well.

fco1922
17-02-2008, 03:12
I won't rant but as those of us active in British schools will know, the National Curriculum is a relatively recent obsession of our target-obsessed government. Until the late 1990s, teachers in England and Wales had tremendous latitude albeit they tended to teach according to A-Level syllabuses.

For those who think that parents take great comfort from SATs, you should read The Telegraph and The Guardian. The SATs have been a major disappointment and do not "level" schools or guarantee standards. Nor does the National Curriculum.

The British private school sector does not generally administer SATs. Many are adopting the IB.

Finally, the Anglo-American School offers the International Baccalaureate. This is NOT an American curriculum. Some high school students do take American AP exams but most follow the IB. The IB is generally felt to be superior to A-Levels and students sitting it will not have any problem gaining admission to universities in the UK, Canada or USA>

fco1922
17-02-2008, 03:13
Bels--I do worry about your grammar! You are an English teacher?

tokenscouser
17-02-2008, 23:54
I think the point is that the schools charge 20K+ a year per student. I'm sure the teachers are more decently paid.

So, I personally know a few of the teachers at some of these schools and can assure you that they are not very well paid. Particularly the staff who are bilingual, prinicipally Russian nationals. These staff are paid next to nothing, the same as people working at McDonald's.

Hmm. What do they do with the money?

dcexpat
18-02-2008, 04:13
Can anyone provide insight/feedback on the Slavic-Anglo-American School "Marina" of Moscow? Thanks!

Freemanster
03-03-2008, 18:36
For those who think that parents take great comfort from SATs, you should read The Telegraph and The Guardian. The SATs have been a major disappointment and do not "level" schools or guarantee standards. Nor does the National Curriculum.


I didn't mean earlier that the SATs would guarantee a good education. They do however provide some marker to follow the children's progress according to recommended levels for their age.

For example, children are given a specific writing task in one section of the test and then teachers must mark carefully whether each child has used correct punctuation, good structure, correct grammar, strong vocabulary, etc...

Not sure how anyone could be disappointed with a straightforward test as it's meant to give feedback rather than educate in itself. Unless of course media and education leaders tried to portray it as some kind of panacea - which I find myself having no difficulty believing.

Bels
03-03-2008, 21:55
Bels--I do worry about your grammar! You are an English teacher?

Are you so terrific? You are certainly a big mouth, of which I am not impressed of the info you give. It's absolute garbage.And I am well aware of grammar and even now I take care to portray it to my students. So watch out, and don't be so so arrogent for yourself. Because I am now watching you now fco1922.is

Gypsy
03-03-2008, 23:09
Are you so terrific? You are certainly a big mouth, of which I am not impressed of the info you give. It's absolute garbage.And I am well aware of grammar and even now I take care to portray it to my students. So watch out, and don't be so so arrogent for yourself. Because I am now watching you now fco1922.is
He is correct,your grammar is atrocious. The 2nd sentence is not actually english, (of which I am not impressed of the info you give) neither is the 4th,(...well aware of grammar and even now I take care to portray it to my students).

And in the political thread you use "their" (the possessive) when you should use "there".

Rather than resort to threats why not write correctly, and take advice from the people correcting you?

Bels
30-06-2008, 23:59
Firstly, Britain does subsidise (I assume you didn't mean 'subsided') a school here. It's AAS and it was originally set up as a result of coordinated efforts between the British, Canadian and American embassies here. Class teachers there are only supposed to come from those countries as a result. So far I don't know that the school has ever suffered as a result of political disagreements.

I didn't know that, as I thought it was purely American. So is that's why the British Embassy recommends AAS?

kirk10071
01-07-2008, 09:59
Bels, I don't believe anyone answered your questions about the French school. The administration and the teaching staff are all native French teachers trained in France and employed by the French Ministry of Education. They choose to take part in a program of teaching in the French schools abroad. There are a couple of exceptions: the Russian language teacher is Russian and I believe there is a Russian history teacher who gives an hour a week or so of a class (in French). The extracurricular activities are organized locally, so the fencing instructor, judo instructor, dance instructors, etc. are either Russian teachers or foreign professionals who teach in French or, if they really cannot, in Russian (enough to communicate with non-Russian speakers).

It is not a requirement to be a French citizen, but priority is given to French citizens or to students who are already in the school system (by transferring from another country, for example). The remaining spots are for Russians or other foreigners, but, like all the schools, space is limited. If you are Russian, you might have a better chance because the school wants to increase it Russian enrollment, space permitting. At present, it is very hard to get into this school if you are not French due to the high number of French families who are guaranteed slots.

As most of the students and all of the teachers are French, the language of instruction and of the playground/cantine is French. There are classes in Russian language for beginners and for those more advanced (such as those who speak Russian as a native language already). There are English classes as well, but these exclusively English as a foreign language for young kids (i.e. colors, parts of the body, basic vocabulary of the house or household pets). There is no real focus on English as the foreign language time is devoted more to Russian. You will not, for example, as a French student be able to hold a conversation in English for many years if you attend this school; it is truly a French school.

Freemanster
02-07-2008, 17:41
I didn't know that, as I thought it was purely American. So is that's why the British Embassy recommends AAS?

The British, American and Canadian embassies all chartered the Anglo-American School. Presumably this was to provide education options for expats during the era when private business could not have operated a school in Moscow (guessing!).

It should be noted however, that the British Ambassador himself has given a speech within the last month in which he very highly commended the International School of Moscow, their academic standards and what they've achieved in their first year of operation. He has also visited and spoken at other schools' events, however I cannot verify the precise content of his speeches.

As a further vote of confidence, I know that within half a year ISM filled up completely and has since had a constant stream of parents insisting on going to inspect the school (and request a place for their children) after receiving strong recommendations from other parents. I cannot accurately comment on the state of affairs at EIS, but I haven't heard anything negative - only positive.

Bels
02-07-2008, 18:50
The British, American and Canadian embassies all chartered the Anglo-American School. Presumably this was to provide education options for expats during the era when private business could not have operated a school in Moscow (guessing!).

It should be noted however, that the British Ambassador himself has given a speech within the last month in which he very highly commended the International School of Moscow, their academic standards and what they've achieved in their first year of operation. He has also visited and spoken at other schools' events, however I cannot verify the precise content of his speeches.

As a further vote of confidence, I know that within half a year ISM filled up completely and has since had a constant stream of parents insisting on going to inspect the school (and request a place for their children) after receiving strong recommendations from other parents. I cannot accurately comment on the state of affairs at EIS, but I haven't heard anything negative - only positive.


I'd love to see a link of the British Ambassador's speech. As I have done many searches, and the only school I can find commended is AAS. So where is this link. We need backup and evidence here. Not heresay.

The fact is that all British schools here are Russian contlolled, just like they now want to try and control BP here. All British companies are having great difficulty controlling and managing things the way they should be done, the British way, and that includes International schools.

A British International should be managed and owned by Brits to function properly and to be authentic, and that's not happening here in Moscow.

What does the British Ambassador say about big brother BP.TNK at the moment? Now you are going to tell me that's not relevent at the moment. But International schools here are also businesses. And we should watch the current news carefully for the moment, in regards to relationships with Russia and the foreign companies investing here.

Bels
02-07-2008, 21:36
Bels, I don't believe anyone answered your questions about the French school. The administration and the teaching staff are all native French teachers trained in France and employed by the French Ministry of Education. They choose to take part in a program of teaching in the French schools abroad. There are a couple of exceptions: the Russian language teacher is Russian and I believe there is a Russian history teacher who gives an hour a week or so of a class (in French). The extracurricular activities are organized locally, so the fencing instructor, judo instructor, dance instructors, etc. are either Russian teachers or foreign professionals who teach in French or, if they really cannot, in Russian (enough to communicate with non-Russian speakers).

It is not a requirement to be a French citizen, but priority is given to French citizens or to students who are already in the school system (by transferring from another country, for example). The remaining spots are for Russians or other foreigners, but, like all the schools, space is limited. If you are Russian, you might have a better chance because the school wants to increase it Russian enrollment, space permitting. At present, it is very hard to get into this school if you are not French due to the high number of French families who are guaranteed slots.

As most of the students and all of the teachers are French, the language of instruction and of the playground/cantine is French. There are classes in Russian language for beginners and for those more advanced (such as those who speak Russian as a native language already). There are English classes as well, but these exclusively English as a foreign language for young kids (i.e. colors, parts of the body, basic vocabulary of the house or household pets). There is no real focus on English as the foreign language time is devoted more to Russian. You will not, for example, as a French student be able to hold a conversation in English for many years if you attend this school; it is truly a French school.

Thanks for that Kirk. Now that's what I call an International school. And our British Department of Education should be following their example, but they don't.

Also another interesting point is that my wife was interested in learning French, and it's amazing that there are French government subsidised foreign courses in French, but nothing subsidised on the British English.

Freemanster
03-07-2008, 01:57
Thanks for that Kirk. Now that's what I call an International school. And our British Department of Education should be following their example, but they don't.

Also another interesting point is that my wife was interested in learning French, and it's amazing that there are French government subsidised foreign courses in French, but nothing subsidised on the British English.

(inhale)

I think you are missing the point. The French government subsidises French courses to stimulate extra demand for their language, thus fostering chances for closer Russian links. There is already steep demand for courses in English, rendering the same subsidies largely superfluous.

I also fail to see what example you refer to that they should be following. There are several choices of British Schools around Moscow and the British Government directly supports one (AAS) and has given a high commendation in a speech regarding at least one other (ISM). The sporting and extra curricular opportunities at these schools is also extremely attractive (ten-pin bowling, golf, swimming, tennis football, dance classes, cooking, extra languages, etc...). Seriously, you mentioned that you wanted to be proud of British schools - there really is stuff out there to be proud of.

It's true that they may hire teachers from Australia, Ireland and New Zealand as well as England, but then, they are also native-speakers. Furthermore, I know for a fact that all of these schools spend a lot of money on professional development to ensure that all the teachers are fully up-to-date with the latest curriculum developments in England.

You should also know that the 'PG' in PGCE stands for 'Post Graduate'. I only mention that because actually, all the teachers I know of at the various British schools do either have their PGCE or have complete undergraduate degrees in education. This means that they actually studied education for 3 or 4 years instead of 1. According to Wikipedia, in England and Wales an undergraduate degree means a teacher is as equally qualified to teach as one with a PGCE. It only takes a couple of minutes to look these kinds of things up actually.

I honestly wouldn't mind ignorance or indifference to English curriculum matters (there is no British Curriculum by the way), except for the fact that you are so quick to pass judgment and make broad statements regarding this topic of which you yourself admit to having outdated knowledge.

I know plenty of teachers from Australia, NZ, South Africa and Ireland who are highly knowledgeable about the English Curriculum that I'd have teaching my kids (if I had any) in a heartbeat ahead of someone with a DFES number but no real idea about what's going on in education.

I believe that things like possessing solid qualifications, committing to professional development (thus staying abreast of the curriculum), caring genuinely about children and knowing what decade it is education-wise are all more important than a dfes number.

Except for possibly your DFES number, which was DFES007. That's just cool!

(exhale)

kirk10071
03-07-2008, 09:48
(inhale)

I think you are missing the point. The French government subsidises French courses to stimulate extra demand for their language, thus fostering chances for closer Russian links.

That's exactly right. It's for the promotion of French abroad, so that expats don't lose their native French language skills, but also, and certainly just as importantly, to put locals in contact with French education to give them good feelings about France and to promote French culture. My kids have been in this school in two countries, and in each case there seems to be an policy from the top down to include as many locals as possible and a mild resistance from the parents to de-Frenchifiying the school. I understand both such positions.

As far as the British government not subsidizing English, was not the British Council subsidized? They are all over the world promoting English.

Bels
03-07-2008, 14:30
That's exactly right. It's for the promotion of French abroad, so that expats don't lose their native French language skills, but also, and certainly just as importantly, to put locals in contact with French education to give them good feelings about France and to promote French culture. My kids have been in this school in two countries, and in each case there seems to be an policy from the top down to include as many locals as possible and a mild resistance from the parents to de-Frenchifiying the school. I understand both such positions.

As far as the British government not subsidizing English, was not the British Council subsidized? They are all over the world promoting English.


The British Council website has an interesting archive section about its history. The British Council is now so successful it has become self sufficient. It used to be subsidised by the government, but this no longer applies.

Unfortunately the British Council is no longer in Russia. But when they were here, their English lessons were expensive. But the fees were probably resonable, if you take into consideration that they paid a decent liveable salary to their teachers. Unlike the cowboys we have around now.

Freemanster
03-07-2008, 22:01
I'd love to see a link of the British Ambassador's speech. As I have done many searches, and the only school I can find commended is AAS. So where is this link. We need backup and evidence here. Not heresay.

The fact is that all British schools here are Russian contlolled, just like they now want to try and control BP here. All British companies are having great difficulty controlling and managing things the way they should be done, the British way, and that includes International schools.

A British International should be managed and owned by Brits to function properly and to be authentic, and that's not happening here in Moscow.

What does the British Ambassador say about big brother BP.TNK at the moment? Now you are going to tell me that's not relevent at the moment. But International schools here are also businesses. And we should watch the current news carefully for the moment, in regards to relationships with Russia and the foreign companies investing here.

wtf? I just saw this message. What are you on about? I hardly know where to start.

...Firstly, how much money are you prepared to bet that not all British schools in Moscow are Russian controlled? I suggest a few hundred dollars. Either put up or shut up.

...The ambassador's speech was at the 'Speech Day' of ISM. I'd say probably at least one parent I know has a video but I'm not sure if anyone was transposing the script, shall I ask someone to make some DVD copies for you? (That's me being facetious).

...There's no small irony in your repeated heresay remarks, since you seem blithely unaware that you are engaging in it yourself, not giving any evidence whatsoever! But for the moment, let's do away with heresay:

Can you please reveal what connections you have to all of these International Schools that gives you great knowledge and enables you to make such sweeping statements about all of them? (Until recently you didn't even know that the British Embassy was directly involved in the Anglo-American school). Can you also please reveal your qualifications, when you obtained them and the last time you received any curriculum professional development that would make you such an expert on the way British schools should run?

I'm sorry to say, but your largely irrelevant comments on education seem to suggest you are the least knowledgeable person so far to post on this thread. You are welcome to prove otherwise.

Bels
03-07-2008, 22:52
wtf? I just saw this message. What are you on about? I hardly know where to start.

...Firstly, how much money are you prepared to bet that not all British schools in Moscow are Russian controlled? I suggest a few hundred dollars. Either put up or shut up.

...The ambassador's speech was at the 'Speech Day' of ISM. I'd say probably at least one parent I know has a video but I'm not sure if anyone was transposing the script, shall I ask someone to make some DVD copies for you? (That's me being facetious).

...There's no small irony in your repeated heresay remarks, since you seem blithely unaware that you are engaging in it yourself, not giving any evidence whatsoever! But for the moment, let's do away with heresay:

Can you please reveal what connections you have to all of these International Schools that gives you great knowledge and enables you to make such sweeping statements about all of them? (Until recently you didn't even know that the British Embassy was directly involved in the Anglo-American school). Can you also please reveal your qualifications, when you obtained them and the last time you received any curriculum professional development that would make you such an expert on the way British schools should run?

I'm sorry to say, but your largely irrelevant comments on education seem to suggest you are the least knowledgeable person so far to post on this thread. You are welcome to prove otherwise.

First and foremost I don't have to prove anything about myself apart from being a caring parent and taking an interest in giving my opinion on this subject. I have lived in Moscow for four years, and I do have two young children being educated in Moscow and I am entitled to give my opinion no matter what my qaulifications are. If you you have known me throughout the forum you would would know perfectly well who I am, what I am, and where I live. I have held back no secrets. I can't say the same about you, as I know nothing about you. What's your sense of purpose here on this thread? Is it to defend one school? Or is it to give as much input as possible to parents. As mine is the latter, and not all of it if you read back is negative, some of it was going towards the positive.

And what about factual backup, look back as I always give links backing up what I state.

Also when I didn't know something, I was honest enough to admit it. Yes I thought the American school was American, an honest mistake, and I'm sure many others thought the same. Or was it argumentive tactics.

So yes!! start giving links like I have done.

Let's start with the link of The British Ambassador's speech, because I can't find it.



And please prove that BIS is British owned, and controlled by Brits. Because believe me, that to me would be good news.

Freemanster
04-07-2008, 00:57
First and foremost I don't have to prove anything about myself apart from being a caring parent and taking an interest in giving my opinion on this subject. I have lived in Moscow, and I do have two young children being educated in Moscow and I am entitled to give my opinion no matter what my qaulifications are. If you you have known me throughout the forum you would would know perfectly well who I am, what I am, and where I live. I have held back no secrets. I can't say the same about you, as I know nothing about you. What's your sense of purpose here on this thread? Is it to defend one school? Or is it to give as much input as possible to parents. As mine is the latter, and not all of it if you read back is negative, some of it was going towards the positive.

And what about factual backup, look back as I always give links backing up what I state.

Also when I didn't know something, I was honest enough to admit it. Yes I thought the American school was American, an honest mistake, and I'm sure many others thought the same. Or was it argumentive tactics.

So yes!! start giving links like I have done.

Let's start with the link of The British Ambassador's speech, because I can't find it.



And please prove that BIS is British owned, and controlled by Brits. Because believe me, that to me would be good news.

Are you competing to see how much you can write without actually saying anything at all?

Actually BIS is not British owned. That's not what you said - you said all British schools here are Russian controlled. I know that at least 2 British schools in Moscow are not 'Russian Controlled', so your sweeping statement that they all are, is either deliberately fooling about to herd folks towards the Russian schools you've bigged up or simplicity mired in ignorance.

I admit it's possible you've revealed plenty about yourself and perhaps provided links to more than just the phone numbers of international schools. Honestly though, I've not the time to wade through your thousands of comments, 99% of which are inane.

Yes, you are entitled to comment as a parent, someone random herding folks towards Russian schools with 'English' teachers or even as the captain of the Goodyear Blimp. I'm actually entitled to give my opinion on the mating habits of Rhesus Macaques - being a primate and all - but the fact is that it wouldn't be worth reading because I know nothing about the topic. Similarly, you may comment as you please about which schools are great or not, while I will retain the right to point out that you have no clue.

Does the British Ambassador list links to every one of his speeches? I was looking for such a site but couldn't find it.

Also, the school is known as the 'Anglo-American School' (hence the acronym 'AAS') and I'd confidently venture that most people correctly understand that there is English involvement. Perhaps I'm coming on a bit harsh, but you are claiming to know an awful lot of interesting details about the international schools in Moscow without knowing so much as the name of the most famous one.

Finally, if you wish things to be done 'the right way - the British way', perhaps it would be cool to begin with spelling and grammar.

Bels
04-07-2008, 15:22
I give in :10168: Let's make expat.ru a promotional site for the good old International School of Moscow. No negative are allowed.

International School of Moscow (http://www.internationalschool.ru/)

And BIS promoting British National curriculum


International Schools in Moscow (http://www.evans.ru/rent/school.html)
The British International School, Moscow (http://www.bismoscow.com/)




The British, American and Canadian embassies all chartered the Anglo-American School. Presumably this was to provide education options for expats during the era when private business could not have operated a school in Moscow (guessing!).

It should be noted however, that the British Ambassador himself has given a speech within the last month in which he very highly commended the International School of Moscow, their academic standards and what they've achieved in their first year of operation. He has also visited and spoken at other schools' events, however I cannot verify the precise content of his speeches.

As a further vote of confidence, I know that within half a year ISM filled up completely and has since had a constant stream of parents insisting on going to inspect the school (and request a place for their children) after receiving strong recommendations from other parents. I cannot accurately comment on the state of affairs at EIS, but I haven't heard anything negative - only positive.

Freemanster
04-07-2008, 15:47
I give in :10168: Let's make expat.ru a promotional site for the good old International School of Moscow. No negative are allowed.

International School of Moscow (http://www.internationalschool.ru/)

Did you (can you) read the last post?

You are very welcome to criticize any school you like. I am also free to point out that you seem to be deliberately lying in some of your generalized statements covering all British Schools. I'm guessing from your past posts you are trying to herd unsuspecting parents towards the Russian schools with 'English' teachers you praise. Also, I am free to point out that your knowledge of international schools (any) and education in Moscow appears to be the least of any poster, so the wild claims you make on the topic should be taken with a grain of salt.

In any case, I didn't know you had posted anything negative about the International School of Moscow or EIS, (not including your wildly broad and inaccurate statements covering all British schools). Have you? If so, could you please provide a link. I wouldn't mind to read the comment, then check with people to see if it's true or false. In any case, I don't understand what you are on about. First you ask people for facts, so I provide verifiable information (a speech and student numbers status) and you throw a childish hissy-fit. I can easily find out more information about schools, but it seems that information is something that you are allergic to.

One last thing. Isn't it funny how you vehemently fight for the right to criticize (which is fine), unless it's regarding your grammar! In this case, you happily attack and offer veiled threats to the person who dares post!

Bels
04-07-2008, 16:08
Did you (can you) read the last post?

You are very welcome to criticize any school you like. I am also free to point out that you seem to be deliberately lying in some of your generalized statements covering all British Schools. I'm guessing from your past posts you are trying to herd unsuspecting parents towards the Russian schools with 'English' teachers you praise. Also, I am free to point out that your knowledge of international schools (any) and education in Moscow appears to be the least of any poster, so the wild claims you make on the topic should be taken with a grain of salt.

In any case, I didn't know you had posted anything negative about the International School of Moscow. Have you?

One last thing. Isn't it funny how you vehemently fight for the right to criticize (which is fine), unless it's about your grammar! In this case, you happily attack and offer veiled threats to the person who dares post!

I'm sorry that my sense of humour doesn't appeal to you, and I'm so sorry that I have a sticky keyboard and the plural s didn't appear on my post. And no I haven't mentioned anything at all about EIS untill my most recent post.

Let's just call it a truce and let's try to help expats relocate to Moscow. As that's what the thread is all about.

Freemanster
04-07-2008, 16:28
Fair enough then! I'd get that keyboard looked at though. :)

Apologies to readers who felt the direction of the thread was diverted somewhat. I hope the interruption has at least been somewhat entertaining.

hka
05-07-2008, 08:39
Yes indeed. And thank you both for agreeing at last....

I say, when it comes to schools, best listen to someone who has first hand experience with given school - either as parent or teacher - what good is hearsay? And even, as we well know, first hand experience is more subjective than objective in most cases - what works for one might not for others and vica versa.
But still, let's not forget, an international school is an INTERNATIONAL school and many parents who enroll their children - I'd said this before - are looking for exactly that - international, and not British, English or American purely.

Fidelio
05-07-2008, 14:22
THE one to aviod is called 'The British International School.' It's owned/ run by an oligarch as a purely money-making venture. Check out the teacher's trade newspaper, 'The Times Educational Supplement,' for background on it.

Freemanster
07-07-2008, 02:11
THE one to aviod is called 'The British International School.' It's owned/ run by an oligarch as a purely money-making venture. Check out the teacher's trade newspaper, 'The Times Educational Supplement,' for background on it.

The message here is pretty close to the mark. Actually BIS used to have a solid reputation but seems to have slid under it's current leadership (both British and Russian aspects). A pity, because a lot of the teachers there are well regarded but are being driven away.

To be pedantic, the primary owner (there's more than one) is not an oligarch but nonetheless a wealthy Russian. Not in itself a negative, but as I mentioned, the school used to be regarded a lot more highly than it is presently. I cannot offer anything more than opinions on whether the school is run for profit, but officially it's not.

hka
07-07-2008, 09:14
Well, maybe there's hope once again for BISM. Judging from this website, the main problem so far has been the administration and not the teachers or the students - if you look at their website (newsletters) you'll see that their long time headmaster is gone now and there's a new British guy running the school from September. Who is in fact a teacher himself. Also, used to teach at the school so hasn't come out here into an unknown territory. It will be interesting to read about the continuted saga of this school here next school year. Hopefully someone will post.

hka
08-07-2008, 21:13
I don't actually know much about the British school have just been following the conversation here on the forum but their IB results seem very impressive.In fact i only read the newsletter because i was searching their website for info about the IB. aren"t they they only international school in moscow besides the aas that do the IB programme?

Freemanster
09-07-2008, 00:01
I don't actually know much about the British school have just been following the conversation here on the forum but their IB results seem very impressive.In fact i only read the newsletter because i was searching their website for info about the IB. aren"t they they only international school in moscow besides the aas that do the IB programme?

I think you may be correct there. As far as I'm aware only BIS and AAS go beyond 16 years old, though I think some of the growing ones are looking at the possibility of extending.

I had also heard about BIS' IB results. One year they did achieve a 100% pass for the IB programme and that is certainly positive. About this, I was also fairly reliably told that they only had 7 or 8 students in that year's cl**** so be aware of that too when weighing it all up. Still, it's 100%. If anyone has more accurate information, feel welcome to add more or correct me.

Bels
09-07-2008, 00:07
I'm still reading BIS ad's. And they are still promoting British National curriculum. So what does that mean??

Yes I have previously given you some links.


I think you may be correct there. As far as I'm aware only BIS and AAS go beyond 16 years old, though I think some of the growing ones are looking at the possibility of extending.

I had also heard about BIS' IB results. One year they did achieve a 100% pass for the IB programme and that is certainly positive. About this, I was also fairly reliably told that they only had 7 or 8 students in that year's cl**** so be aware of that too when weighing it all up. Still, it's 100%. If anyone has more accurate information, feel welcome to add more or correct me.

Freemanster
09-07-2008, 00:54
I'm still reading BIS ad's. And they are still promoting British National curriculum. So what does that mean??

Yes I have previously given you some links.

BIS runs the British Curriculum to Year 12, but have the IB Diploma Programme for older students in 'Year 13'. Generally not so many expats take this program there but I'm unsure whether this is due to school reputation, the fact that often older children go to boarding schools in home countries or because the British or American curricula are usually enough to apply to universities worldwide. You would have to ask parents themselves to find out for sure.

Apologies by the way if I did not comment so thoroughly on your links to the same information earlier. It's hard to keep up with all your posts!

hka
09-07-2008, 08:57
The IB programme is becoming ever more popular, just about a year ago there was an article in The Economist (sorry, can't give you a link) that even Oxford and Cambridge are beginning to think that it might just be the best high school programme all around. And it is fairly standard for most schools to offer the two year programme, as pointed out above - 'year 13' - just like A levels, or grades 11-12 probably in the American or European system. There are not too many schools that have the full elementary/middle school IB programme, it's probably not so easy to retrain so many primary school teachers - I don't know. So in fact a school might be able to offer any kind of curriculum for the first 11-12 years and then still run the IB for the last two.
And if I remember well, some Russian schools run the IB as well, like the Eurogymnasium and also the Economic school.

BeachBum
09-07-2008, 09:33
May I ask why you find it so necessary for your child to go to an international school rather than let's say a good GYMNASIUM Russian school where they are heavily regulated by government to reach a good standard and that the international schools can pop up where and when they like without being regulated by any force? May I also ask which nationality of International school you are looking for. British or American.
Sir. Mr Bels is absolutely correct. The Anglo American School is highly Overrated and overpriced. Russian schools offer a very sound education. And most importantly, if you will be here for an extended length of time. What better way to increase the quality of life and future for your child than by placing them in a position to learn not only a new language but culture.

Freemanster
09-07-2008, 10:38
The IB programme is becoming ever more popular, just about a year ago there was an article in The Economist (sorry, can't give you a link) that even Oxford and Cambridge are beginning to think that it might just be the best high school programme all around. And it is fairly standard for most schools to offer the two year programme, as pointed out above - 'year 13' - just like A levels, or grades 11-12 probably in the American or European system. There are not too many schools that have the full elementary/middle school IB programme, it's probably not so easy to retrain so many primary school teachers - I don't know. So in fact a school might be able to offer any kind of curriculum for the first 11-12 years and then still run the IB for the last two.
And if I remember well, some Russian schools run the IB as well, like the Eurogymnasium and also the Economic school.

I think you are spot on here and it was worth mentioning. I've also heard from highly regarded educators that it is an excellent programme and I don't think the fact that not so many take the IB diploma in BIS (not sure about AAS) is related to the quality of the programme itself. There are other factors that probably come into it more - boarding school options, possibly school reputations, desire to proceed with university. You're probably right about teachers too. It must be difficult to find trained or experienced teachers, but perhaps this will change in the future.

hka
09-07-2008, 12:03
Ok, this is my last 'not so sure' comments, but I think someone told me that at AAS it is also possible to choose between the IB and a regular high school diploma. And there must be a lot of people who go for the boarding school option all around because it is not half as difficult to get into the AAS high school as the elementary where there's a huge waiting list.

Arty
20-08-2008, 15:05
Hi
To make a decision about moving to Moscow from the US, we need to first figure out the option for our kid's schooling. At present they are 8 and 12 . I have spoken to the admissions office at Anglo-American and they seem to be full.
The admissions office at the British International School were helpful but need to know if our kids will be able to adjust to the change in curriculum.
Has anyone gone through this and has any advice to help us?

Thanks

Vivtwins
20-08-2008, 15:42
Everyone goes on about how wonderful the EIS is but I was just wondering what the area is like - is it relatively clean or polluted - I have heard both opinions!

Thanks

Bels
20-08-2008, 18:07
Who is everyone, is this place not relatively new, and yet to prove itself. Now BIS or the Anglo American school you might be talking. In fct is this little school accredited?

Do you want to promote it.

delgado
18-11-2008, 18:12
Is it possible and livable to live in the center (patriarchy-tverskaya) while having kids in these 2 schools? Hopefully it would be only temporary (the 2 schools!!)... How long would it take by car and metro in the morning and afternoon???
Would Kropotkinskaya be better? Towards the EIS and the AAS???
We're arriving from the Gulf; so our children are quite used to spending one hour in the bus twice a day, but more would be.... too much!!!
Thanks a lot for your help!!!

Bels
20-11-2008, 01:26
Is it possible and livable to live in the center (patriarchy-tverskaya) while having kids in these 2 schools? Hopefully it would be only temporary (the 2 schools!!)... How long would it take by car and metro in the morning and afternoon???
Would Kropotkinskaya be better? Towards the EIS and the AAS???
We're arriving from the Gulf; so our children are quite used to spending one hour in the bus twice a day, but more would be.... too much!!!
Thanks a lot for your help!!!

Tough I think. Anything is possible if you are being well paid and have been attracted by good guidance from your employer. If your employer can't assure you of a good income, with covering the costs of a good driver etc, etc. I would forget it. You now need a very good to bother coming to Moscow.

And for me ? I and my wife have thought about central Moscow and the prospects of business or working. The problem is moving from A to B fast enough, the problem is to make it profitable, and we can't work that one out! Moving from Ato B is impossible to do profitably here, whether you are in Moscow or in the so callad region of Moscow. Transport and efficiancy of movement is getting worse every day here, regional or central.

Reverend
24-11-2008, 11:54
from their site (http://www.aas.ru/about.cfm): "The Anglo-American School is chartered by the American, British, and Canadian Embassies in Moscow through the aegis of a School Board"

nevertheless I am sure that the AAS is NOT a non-profit venture.... AAS is absolutely a not-for-profit organization. Any "surplus" is returned to maintain facilities and support the program. There is no subsidy from the USA or other government nor any payment back to it. The school is self-supporting and there are no "dividends" or other payments to Board members or embassies. Board members serve without pay or other compensation.

Reverend
24-11-2008, 12:01
May I ask why you find it so necessary for your child to go to an international school rather than let's say a good GYMNASIUM Russian school where they are heavily regulated by government to reach a good standard and that the international schools can pop up where and when they like without being regulated by any force? May I also ask which nationality of International school you are looking for. British or American. It is important to determine whether any given school is accredited and by whom. I rather doubt that the Russian government allows a school to "pop up when and where they like without begin regulated by any force." (That is, without the brown envelope that even Russian private schools probably pass over regardless of their quality.)

If you've followed this site - and you've posted thousands of times so I know you do - you should be aware of the miserable experience that many foreign kids have in attempting to study in a mostly-Russian or all-Russian school. That, plus the desire to have your children learn from native-English speakers, is a big reason why most foreigners send their kids to foreign system schools. Many of the private Russian schools are expensive as well and they do regularly ask for additional payments beyond the published fees.

Bourne End
20-11-2009, 21:50
I have two children at the EIS and would definately recomend it. Trafic out of the town center in a morning is not so bad as the traffic is moving into the city. At night the traffic is going out of the city and the school bus is going in so again not much of a problem - usually...

Bels
20-11-2009, 22:06
Yes I do realise that the only option for those English speaking expats coming to work in Russia is to use an English speaking International backed by the British or North American government,. But where are they?!!!

Is the BIS and Amerierican International School stil constantly over booked due to English speaking consulates children having first optio. Or are they no longer over-booked due to a recession. Who can give this answer.

For example, I am overbooked for kids in Rublevka for English as a foriegn language, but pleas call me in January 2010 as times may change, and most certainly start calling me starting from May 2010 as so many of my students start travelling on holidays by then.

Call me in the Summer if your kids are having problems with these international schools.

Bourne End
21-11-2009, 22:44
Bels... where are what,,, the schools, the government people, the kids, thier family's

I am glad that you have now realised that it is maybe not so easy for a foreign child just to go to a school where it cannot be understood and cannot understadn anything. I have read many of your posts...

Bels
21-11-2009, 23:05
Let us get on thing straight. Those children who have just arrived in Russia speaking English only as a first language can only go to an International English speaking school such as the American International school of which appears to be seen as the best here. Hopefully it is no longer overbooked.

Those like my children, who have developed both English and Russian as first languages have a greater choice here. It all depends on your child.

Where to go? We have a sticky above this thread of where to go. Mine are in Russian state schools. |Unfortunately I don't think it is the best. but it is the best we can do under the circumstances.

Italy
02-12-2009, 18:01
Let us get on thing straight. Those children who have just arrived in Russia speaking English only as a first language can only go to an International English speaking school such as the American International school of which appears to be seen as the best here. Hopefully it is no longer overbooked.

Those like my children, who have developed both English and Russian as first languages have a greater choice here. It all depends on your child.

Where to go? We have a sticky above this thread of where to go. Mine are in Russian state schools. |Unfortunately I don't think it is the best. but it is the best we can do under the circumstances.

So would you recommend for a bilingual child to go for Russian state school? Which are the advantages? My child is bilingual Italian-Russian and will start his 1st grade next year. I was thinking about Italian school, which will be easier for him in terms of integration into Russian life after his kindergarten in Italy...

Academy
18-12-2009, 17:18
Is the BIS and Amerierican International School stil constantly over booked due to English speaking consulates children having first optio. Or are they no longer over-booked due to a recession. Who can give this answer.

From what I have heard, AIS is still busy but new students can get places, especially from year 7 and up. BIS is less busy amongst expats - more due to management issues than crisis - but still keeps busy with larger percentages of non-native English-speaking children.

toughnut
24-01-2010, 19:46
I can give an insider's view of the BIS.
A few years ago one summer, an acquaintance asked me to cover for a day for a teacher at BIS who was away on maternity leave. I have a son and was thinking of sending him there, so I took the opportunity. I'm very glad I did, because what I saw really shocked me.
A Russian teaching assistant had been left in charge of a group of Year 1 children - for how long, I hate to think. The headmaster spoke highly of her - she was young and pretty - but she had absolutely none of the qualities that you would look for in a primary school teacher. She was monosyllabic, robotic, unsmiling and seemed to have no teaching skills beyond being able to hand out workbooks. The children spent all the time in class doing work in their workbooks with varying degrees of success. My job was to help them.
After 2 hours of this, they had a music lesson. Several classes of children met in a large hall; they sat on the floor and waited for the music teacher to arrive; the teacher didn't come, so the children sang various nursery action songs with their class teachers.
Some time later, the kids had library time. In other words, they were let loose in the library to open books at random, chatting and looking at the pictures.
I was asked to take an English language lesson with an older group of children in the afternoon. I was told to give the kids an English reading comprehension test.
I was given 100 bucks at the end of the day. I asked the headmaster what the SATS results were. They compared with those of a London state school in a poor area where a lot of kids speak English as a second language.
I decided that it would be absolutely insane to spend money on sending my son to a school like this when I wouldn't send him to a similar one in London at no cost.
I also noted that BIS had almost no specialised sport or music teachers, and in a city like this with high quality music, art, dance and sport schools etc at practically every single metro stop, this is an absolute disgrace considering the cost.
And, by the way, I have not met a single teacher from BIS who has a good thing to say about it! And, actually, the ones I met in the staff room were extraordinarily dissatisfied and miserable.
I know for a fact that they employ newly-qualified TEFL teachers with only a TEFL certificate. (I have a friend, an ex-BIS teacher but now a teacher-trainer in Edinburgh, who taught this teacher.)
My son goes to an ordinary Russian school with a good Maths curriculum and a demanding teacher who assesses the kids regularly so that all of them reach a good standard. He is completely bilingual. He does not go to English lessons at school but studies privately. In addition, he plays tennis, goes ballroom dancing, learns the piano and swims. The quality of teaching for every single subject he studies is extremely high. Not a moment of tuition is wasted. And it's cheap - apart from the tutor who helps him with his school homework.
In my opinion, at least for primary education, this is the best option.

nbogaard
25-01-2010, 10:28
My daughter is almost seven and is in second grade at British International School. We are pleased with her progress. She is completely bilingual so the Russian public schools were an option but they don't start until age 7.

We were very impressed with The International school of of Moscow International School of Moscow, Russia (http://www.internationalschool.ru/home/InternationalSchool/en/)
but they only go up to 8th grade and we have no plans for leaving Moscow.

We considered the English International School recently as a potential alternative but it is on the far eastern side of the city and I really do not want me daughter in the car or on the bus for that long every day, though I believe all of the schools have bus services.

The English International School Moscow | About English International School (http://www.englishedmoscow.com/)

The Anglo-American School of Moscow has got, hands down, the best facilitiies. Good luck!

Bels
25-01-2010, 21:42
My daughter is almost seven and is in second grade at British International School. We are pleased with her progress. She is completely bilingual so the Russian public schools were an option but they don't start until age 7.

We were very impressed with The International school of of Moscow International School of Moscow, Russia (http://www.internationalschool.ru/home/InternationalSchool/en/)
but they only go up to 8th grade and we have no plans for leaving Moscow.

We considered the English International School recently as a potential alternative but it is on the far eastern side of the city and I really do not want me daughter in the car or on the bus for that long every day, though I believe all of the schools have bus services.

The English International School Moscow | About English International School (http://www.englishedmoscow.com/)

The Anglo-American School of Moscow has got, hands down, the best facilitiies. Good luck!

Yes great for the American school. Not knocking them because they are often fully booked and you are very lucky to afford and get them in there.

But for Russian children of whom Russian is their first language, I also have had great success in teaching children English from the age of three to the age of ten on beginner, and they are also speaking , writing , listening and reading in English fluently. With many many of them learning this before they have learnt all of these skills in Russian. So what does that tell you. Come here and I will prove it to here, as they are here.

So for those russian young students, you don't need an international school. And to be honest with you if you cant get in to the American school, you are wasting your time. Even the children from the British Embassyl choose the American School, so what does that tell you?

Bels
25-01-2010, 21:47
An honest question. Why do some Russians chose international schools as against Their Russian schools. Of course the ones who do can afford it. What made them decide it was the best choice. LOL!

nbogaard
26-01-2010, 06:25
Please understand, Bels. I think the Russian schools can be excellent but if the child has no Russian, I do not think that they offer much in the way of Russian as a second language. My daughter has been attending an English language school but we are seriously considering moving her to a Russian school next fall as she is completely bilingual and I think the academic aspect will be more demanding.

toughnut
26-01-2010, 14:13
I have already mentioned that I thought BIS was not worth the money and that my son goes to a Russian primary school.

I think primary schools can be rather good. Everything depends on the teacher though. The best way to find out who the best teachers are is to hang around outside the schools at going home time and talk to mothers about their children's teacher.

If you go to a school with several parallel classes, try to find out how the children were placed. In my son's school, there is a gimnazichesky class for clever kids or kids with influential parents, a class with a good Maths programme for children who could already read on entering school, and two other classes. You may find that the kids have been placed according to whether they are extroverts or introverts, have rich/poor parents or are very bright/not so bright.

A good indicator of an ambitious teacher is one who gives children homework in Year 1 - officially not allowed, I think, but it's not a bad idea as it will give you an idea as to what is going on. Also, do they have reading book diaries? And what are the after-school activities? And check to see if the teacher has a reputation for not completing the curriculum each year. I found out that my son's first teacher hadn't even done half the required work at the end of year one. Many parents complained that their kids seemed to know less at the end of the year than at the beginning!

One more thing. Ask mums to explain what they mean by 'good' teacher. It may not be what you expect.

And a word of warning. I think the Russian system is much better suited to girls - especially the academic kind - than boys. Both my brother and nephew would have been complete failures in Russian schools because of their dreadful handwriting - and yet they are both academically brilliant. My son regularly gets 3s and 4s for Maths, for example, even though he gets the answers all right.

Boys also need time and space to run around. This is discouraged in every school I have been to.

And girls have better social/communication skills. Russian schools do absolutely nothing to help boys develop these. Each child sits separately and works individually - a style of education which is rather dreary.

Remember you can also ask to sit in on a lesson to see how the teacher works.

crossroots
29-01-2010, 14:15
There is also a great Christian school at Metro Profsyuznaya on the orange line in the south. The website is: Hinkson Christian Academy (http://www.hinkson.ru). Take a look and see what you think.

kapione
30-01-2010, 09:20
Children grow from being challenged , not inactivity....
A good teacher stretches the boundaries ,but knows the childrens limits, than builds on them. BIS is overpriced and overrated

Bels
30-01-2010, 21:32
LOL! mathematics teahcers please expalain, Handwriting!! of course if the handwriting is unreadable to the maths teacher, then it has to bewrong. But if the handwriting is readble, then in maths it is correct. In fact if I can read hand writing clearly, in teaching English I give five plus, But if I can't read it I might give much less. Pretty writing is for artists nowadays. I am not here to teach pretty hand writing. I am here to teach what is understood. How often nawadays do we use handwriting in today's technology. as we normally type now. And who wants to knock the left handers whose hand writing might look to them, but not the right handers. Legible and understanding writing is all we look for. No more. They understand and answer in correct grammar they are correct. More so in maths, as there is only one answer, the correct one,, and nothing to do with pretty handwriting. You want anything nice? go to an artist teacher.


I have already mentioned that I thought BIS was not worth the money and that my son goes to a Russian primary school.

I think primary schools can be rather good. Everything depends on the teacher though. The best way to find out who the best teachers are is to hang around outside the schools at going home time and talk to mothers about their children's teacher.

If you go to a school with several parallel classes, try to find out how the children were placed. In my son's school, there is a gimnazichesky class for clever kids or kids with influential parents, a class with a good Maths programme for children who could already read on entering school, and two other classes. You may find that the kids have been placed according to whether they are extroverts or introverts, have rich/poor parents or are very bright/not so bright.

A good indicator of an ambitious teacher is one who gives children homework in Year 1 - officially not allowed, I think, but it's not a bad idea as it will give you an idea as to what is going on. Also, do they have reading book diaries? And what are the after-school activities? And check to see if the teacher has a reputation for not completing the curriculum each year. I found out that my son's first teacher hadn't even done half the required work at the end of year one. Many parents complained that their kids seemed to know less at the end of the year than at the beginning!

One more thing. Ask mums to explain what they mean by 'good' teacher. It may not be what you expect.

And a word of warning. I think the Russian system is much better suited to girls - especially the academic kind - than boys. Both my brother and nephew would have been complete failures in Russian schools because of their dreadful handwriting - and yet they are both academically brilliant. My son regularly gets 3s and 4s for Maths, for example, even though he gets the answers all right.

Boys also need time and space to run around. This is discouraged in every school I have been to.

And girls have better social/communication skills. Russian schools do absolutely nothing to help boys develop these. Each child sits separately and works individually - a style of education which is rather dreary.

Remember you can also ask to sit in on a lesson to see how the teacher works.

Jools2002
19-02-2010, 13:06
Interesting, I wonder if the British Embassy endorses any of the British Intermational schools here in Moscow in any form. Because if they do, it would increase my confidence in whether to send my children there or not. But for the time being I'm sticking to selected Russian schools.

Just the fact that they will be bi-lingual is one big plus for their future in Britain. And I have more faith in maths and Science in these schools.


Please, tell me what russian school you send your kids. I would like to do the same

nbogaard
19-02-2010, 14:11
Please, tell me what russian school you send your kids. I would like to do the same

Earlier in this thread, I wrote that my daughter, who is completely bi-lingual (reads, writes and speaks English and Russian with equal facility) was attending British International School and that we were pleased with her progress.

Later, I wrote that we were considering moving her to a Russian public school as the good Russian public schools have excellent academic programs. We started looking about a month ago as she is in second grade (the equivalent of first grade in Russian schools) and will turn 7 in the Spring. We identified the school and in talking to the Director, she said that Sonya would not be ready for second grade unless she made the change soon.

We were so impressed with the school, the teacher and the director that we pulled her out of BIS and put her in the Russian school. She was not used to the strict requirements at first but she has lots of little girlfriends now and she is much improved in following directions and being careful in her work. She is very happy and is enjoying herself. I don't know how old your child is or if he/she speaks Russian but my wife tells me that schools would be unlikely to accept a child who didn't have Russian unless the child was very young like going into kidergarten.

If you speak and read Russian, you can try to find the School ratings for Moscow schools in Izvestia.

The number 1 rated school is School 57. If you want further information, please PM me. Good luck!

Jools2002
19-02-2010, 15:48
Earlier in this thread, I wrote that my daughter, who is completely bi-lingual (reads, writes and speaks English and Russian with equal facility) was attending British International School and that we were pleased with her progress.

Later, I wrote that we were considering moving her to a Russian public school as the good Russian public schools have excellent academic programs. We started looking about a month ago as she is in second grade (the equivalent of first grade in Russian schools) and will turn 7 in the Spring. We identified the school and in talking to the Director, she said that Sonya would not be ready for second grade unless she made the change soon.

We were so impressed with the school, the teacher and the director that we pulled her out of BIS and put her in the Russian school. She was not used to the strict requirements at first but she has lots of little girlfriends now and she is much improved in following directions and being careful in her work. She is very happy and is enjoying herself. I don't know how old your child is or if he/she speaks Russian but my wife tells me that schools would be unlikely to accept a child who didn't have Russian unless the child was very young like going into kidergarten.

If you speak and read Russian, you can try to find the School ratings for Moscow schools in Izvestia.

The number 1 rated school is School 57. If you want further information, please PM me. Good luck!

Thank you

nbogaard
19-02-2010, 15:52
Thank you

I sent you a PM with Izvestia thread.

lurdes77
23-05-2010, 22:13
I sent you a PM with Izvestia thread.

Hi, could you PM me a link to Izvestia as well?

lurdes77
23-05-2010, 22:14
Any new feedback on International School of Moscow?

AAS is not an option as we will most likely live on the south, Prospekt Vernandskogo area. ISM seems to be helf hour away by car? And they also seem to provide transportation.

SV1973a
23-05-2010, 23:04
A very nice area to live. I also live in the South-West, at Leninskiy Prospekt, right where Prospekt Vernadskogo and Leninskiy Prospekt meet.
Occassionaly I had to bring my daughter to the ISM (because they provide their facilities also for other nationalities to teach pupils their native language).
NO WAY, that you can get from Vernadskogo to Krilatskoe in 30 minutes in morning and evening rush hour.
It usually took me 45min to 60 min at 14h00, but when we return at 18h00 it easily takes me 2 hours.

lurdes77
23-05-2010, 23:10
A very nice area to live. I also live in the South-West, at Leninskiy Prospekt, right where Prospekt Vernadskogo and Leninskiy Prospekt meet.
Occassionaly I had to bring my daughter to the ISM (because they provide their facilities also for other nationalities to teach pupils their native language).
NO WAY, that you can get from Vernadskogo to Krilatskoe in 30 minutes in morning and evening rush hour.
It usually took me 45min to 60 min at 14h00, but when we return at 18h00 it easily takes me 2 hours.

what about if we live close to school in Krilatskoe, how long it will take to get to Domodedovo?

SV1973a
23-05-2010, 23:28
what about if we live close to school in Krilatskoe, how long it will take to get to Domodedovo?

Probably between 1 and 2 hours in the morning.
In the evening that can be much longer.
It is a busy road that you need to take, from Moscow to the Airport and back.
A lot of people are going to the airport or returning home, and you will be among them.
Besides you also need to take the MKAD for a good number of kilometers...

moscowman
26-06-2011, 14:07
Schooling is a very emotive issue and everyone has an opinion. [We have all been to school so we KNOW what it is all about.]

You best bet is to ignore ALL the comments on here and go and see for yourself.

Once you have visited then ask the HT to give you the names of some parents who you can talk to about the school and the education it offers.

Remember - no school is perfect.

A point worth considering for parents of older children is the BIS [School 3] has the best IB results in Russia.