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KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 17:32
This is a rather pointless question, but I'm curious. I'm aware that hello in Russian is pronounced 'zdra-stvooy-tye' and thank you is 'spa-see-ba', however to my (very unrefined) ear, it seems that about a quarter of people I greet or have passing conversation with quite clearly say 'zdra-stya' and/or 'pa-see-ba' instead.

I was just wondering, is this the result of regional/foreign accents or laziness in speech or similar to me saying 'hiya' in English - as Aussies and New Zealanders are prone to do?

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 18:00
I was just wondering, is this the result of regional/foreign accents or laziness in speech or similar to me saying 'hiya' in English - as Aussies and New Zealanders are prone to do?

Your ears are good. Very often the russians shorten the long words in the live speach.

Sparafucile
27-02-2012, 18:00
'zdra-stya'

It's the familiar form. You can say it to people with whom you're already friends.

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 18:16
Cheers!

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 18:24
Kiwi, in order to speak russian fluent, you should learn a bit russian slang also.

It would be high class for you.

You know a person very well, don't say to her (him) "sdravstvuite". It sounds too official.... Say "privet" or "sdrasty".

Or say not "spasibo" but "spasibochki"... :))) It would be very cool for a foreigner.

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 18:31
Ohhh, I'm so far away from learning Russian fluently that you wouldn't believe it. But yes, I have used preevyet and pakka. Much more manageable for my poor English mouth than tongue-twisty 'zdrastvooytye'!

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 18:31
Kiwi, in order to speak russian fluent, you should learn a bit russian slang also.

It would be high class for you.

You know a person very well, don't say to her (him) "sdravstvuite". It sounds too official.... Say "privet" or "sdrasty".

Or say not "spasibo" but "spasibochki"... :))) It would be very cool for a foreigner.

Ochin Krutoi! ;)

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 18:37
. But yes, I have used preevyet and pakka.
!

Instead of "pokka"... sometimes you can say "Nu davai !"

It's also a very spread-spoken russian slang expression. :)))

celia
27-02-2012, 18:43
Hi, I'm new to Russia and I can never practise greetings because I can't remember them without a piece of paper in front of me!

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 18:45
I can never practise greetings because I can't remember them without a piece of paper in front of me!

You haven't a good memory then.

Try to speak russian more often. It can help you.

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 18:48
Hi, I'm new to Russia and I can never practise greetings because I can't remember them without a piece of paper in front of me!

Find a Russian boyfriend; they are the best! ;)

If not, find a Russian girlfriend - they are cute and will help your Russian language! :)

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 18:49
So much to remember! I would like to be using less formal speech, though. 'Nu davai' - I understand davai to mean 'lets' or something similar to that. What is the translation of 'nu davai'?

Celia: I know what you mean, everything is such a mouthful! I'm ok with the greetings now (after five weeks!), but it still takes me a minute or two of thinking to be able to get 've gavareetye pa angleeskee?' out of my mouth! However I have had to say 'ya nye pinemayo' so many times now I don't even have to think about it!

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 18:52
So much to remember! I would like to be using less formal speech, though. 'Nu davai' - I understand davai to mean 'lets' or something similar to that. What is the translation of 'nu davai'?

Celia: I know what you mean, everything is such a mouthful! I'm ok with the greetings now (after five weeks!), but it still takes me a minute or two of thinking to be able to get 've gavareetye pa angleeskee?' out of my mouth! However I have had to say 'ya nye pinemayo' so many times now I don't even have to think about it!

Well, thats a start and better than uttering, "Ya ne Ponedelnik!" ;)

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 18:58
Celia: I know what you mean, everything is such a mouthful!
it!
You know... but russian is more expressive. It has more shades of meaning.

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 19:08
You know... but russian is more expressive. It has more shades of meaning.

I think you mean its a 'richer' language :10310:

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 19:09
I think you mean its a 'richer' language :10310:

Yeah, thank you for the notice.

A russian can speak a few words but they are often very expressive (очень выразительные).

So russian isn't difficult language for those who have a hot yearning to learn it.

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 19:26
it still takes me a minute or two of thinking to be able to get 've gavareetye pa angleeskee?' out of my mouth! However I have had to say 'ya nye pinemayo' so many times now I don't even have to think about it!

Kiwi, better say more shortly. "Chavo tebe ? " or "Chto vam nado ?"

It would be sounding more natural.

In unoffical situation the russians try to speak more lakonically.

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 19:27
Well, thats a start and better than uttering, "Ya ne Ponedelnik!" ;)

Do you mean saying "I'm not Monday"? Hahahaha, I hope I've never said that, although it is always a possibility. I have had many moments when I've said what I believe to be flawless Russian words and been met with utter confusion, so perhaps that is indeed what I've been telling people...

Regarding the expressiveness and relative ease of learning Russian, from what I've read and heard it is indeed a very rich language and the various levels of meaning that can be conveyed (generally by changing prefixes and suffixes and sentence orders, I believe?) are probably very different to the confines of English. At a more superficial level, I think it's lovely to listen to. My problem is not with Russian per se, but the learning of a language in itself. I have been ruined by living in a small island nation that feels it is disconnected enough from everywhere but Britain and Australia to get away with placing little value on teaching its students foreign languages.

Because of this, I've never learnt anything in the way of languages and I'm probably wandering around telling people I'm not Monday.

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 19:29
Kiwi, better say more shortly. "Chavo tebe ? " or "Chto vam nado ?"

It would be sounding more natural.

In unoffical situation the russians try to speak more lakonically.

These two mean "I don't understand"?

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 19:31
These two mean "I don't understand"? not quite so but the russians often speak these phrases in the everyday conversations.

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 19:38
've gavareetye pa angleeskee?'




You can express the meaning of this phrase more shortly. "Znaete angleesky ?"

Like in italian language. "Parlami italiano ?" Seems it's so.

Benedikt
27-02-2012, 19:43
Ohhh, I'm so far away from learning Russian fluently that you wouldn't believe it. But yes, I have used preevyet and pakka. Much more manageable for my poor English mouth than tongue-twisty 'zdrastvooytye'!

or you use it only with people that you are in close contact, good colleagues at work for instance.
for the rest, in German we say -guten morgen- but most of the time you will hear a more or less mumbled -morgen-.
slang or -colloquial language is something very nice but one has to get acquainted with it. and not to worry to much if something is pronounced this way or that way. the main thing is to say SOMETHING and not to turn away and not reply.

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 20:01
Now that I've learnt the long way, I may have to stick with it for the time being. I think my brain is busy trying to learn new stuff at the moment. I may just have to sound like a tourist for a while yet.

And Benedikt, you're right, I do tend to get the gist of what people are saying, and when I answer back I'm sure they know straight away that I am struggling, just from my thick accent. It's not in the kiwi way to turn away without saying anything, even when nothing's been said to me to begin with - much to the confusion of my rather surly local shop assistants, door men and supermarket cashiers!

FatAndy
27-02-2012, 20:14
Ohhh, I'm so far away from learning Russian fluently that you wouldn't believe it. But yes, I have used preevyet and pakka. Much more manageable for my poor English mouth than tongue-twisty 'zdrastvooytye'!
'Zdrasteee' or, if you have a kind of tension with the person, but want to be polite, 'zdrassss'
;)

It is very difficult to crook/twist tongue for a foreign spy in the very beginning, but then it gets easier and easiier, ask TolkoRaz, he'll confirm... :D

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 20:19
Ooooh, that is a LOT of shades of meaning in one greeting! Who would have thought one could convey tension yet politeness in dropping one syllable and drawing out another...

I give up!

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 20:20
'Zdrasteee' or, if you have a kind of tension with the person, but want to be polite, 'zdrassss'
;)

It is very difficult to crook/twist tongue for a foreign spy in the very beginning, but then it gets easier and easiier, ask TolkoRaz, he'll confirm... :D

FatAndy, you laugh but TGP told me that her former expat boss was ex-CIA officer who learnt russian in the american spies-shool. :))))

FatAndy
27-02-2012, 20:25
Don't tell me, I personally have thrusted a few of them in that stonecrusher at Lubyanka basement ;)

FatAndy
27-02-2012, 20:27
Ooooh, that is a LOT of shades of meaning in one greeting! Who would have thought one could convey tension yet politeness in dropping one syllable and drawing out another...

I give up!
Не надо ля-ля! Учись и работай! Практика и ещё раз практика! :D
You've even not started yet foul language' shades of meaning ;)

Korotky Gennady
27-02-2012, 20:28
I give up! Instead of saying "Zdravstvuite" you can give a nod simply also.

It's polite enough in russian culture.

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 20:43
Do you mean saying "I'm not Monday"? Hahahaha, I hope I've never said that, although it is always a possibility. I have had many moments when I've said what I believe to be flawless Russian words and been met with utter confusion, so perhaps that is indeed what I've been telling people...

Regarding the expressiveness and relative ease of learning Russian, from what I've read and heard it is indeed a very rich language and the various levels of meaning that can be conveyed (generally by changing prefixes and suffixes and sentence orders, I believe?) are probably very different to the confines of English. At a more superficial level, I think it's lovely to listen to. My problem is not with Russian per se, but the learning of a language in itself. I have been ruined by living in a small island nation that feels it is disconnected enough from everywhere but Britain and Australia to get away with placing little value on teaching its students foreign languages.

Because of this, I've never learnt anything in the way of languages and I'm probably wandering around telling people I'm not Monday.

Udachi! :)

(Good Luck!) ;)

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 20:45
Ooooh, that is a LOT of shades of meaning in one greeting! Who would have thought one could convey tension yet politeness in dropping one syllable and drawing out another...

I give up!

More 'Shades' than Michael Jackson used to wear! :p

KiwiTess
27-02-2012, 20:53
Udachi! :)

(Good Luck!) ;)

Seems like I'll need it just to greet people!

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 21:02
Seems like I'll need it just to greet people!

LOL! :) Moscow's a friendly place; you'll have a fine time and if you learn a few words, the Russians will appreciate it all the more! :)

vovik01
27-02-2012, 21:03
Why you need russian language? For fun? It's not working this way:-)

vovik01
27-02-2012, 21:06
LOL! :) Moscow's a friendly place...
If you don't speak russian, it means you foreigner... Chances to being robbed doubled:-)

yakspeare
27-02-2012, 21:09
i obviously failed spy school because it took me a whole year before i could say zdravoostye...and just did zdrasti, privet everywhere.

It took me 3 days at university(also have trouble with vooniveristite in university-putting these sounds together) to say prestavte cebe, prestavte cebe cobcem kak ogorechnik...

and the word to protect/defend zashzshaishitsa...

but if you can correctly pronounce the capital of Georgia, Tbilisi, like a Russian-then you are well on your way( I still can't put a soft t next to a b like that)

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 21:11
If you don't speak russian, it means you foreigner... Chances to being robbed doubled:-)

Really? So, the prestupniki only rob illiterate foreigners? :confused:

I take it they conduct an interview, assess level of language skill and then rob?

I think they target those wearing flashy watches, are careless with their wallets etc? I am quite sure that language ability has nothing to do with the chance of becoming a victim or not! :10310:

But, thanks for scaring those expats and tourists who struggle with the Russian Language, or indeed any foreign language! :eek:

vovik01
27-02-2012, 21:18
Really? So, the prestupniki only rob illiterate foreigners? :confused:

I take it they conduct an interview, assess level of language skill and then rob?

I think they target those wearing flashy watches, are careless with their wallets etc? I am quite sure that language ability has nothing to do with the chance of becoming a victim or not! :10310:

But, thanks for scaring those expats and tourists who struggle with the Russian Language, or indeed any foreign language! :eek:
:-)))

Robbed- have many meanings:-)

Questions "how much to Yaroslavsky station?" or "Почем поедем до Комсомольской?" have different answers for the price:-))))

vovik01
27-02-2012, 21:22
it is not scaring , it's a warning!

TolkoRaz
27-02-2012, 21:24
:-)))

Robbed- have many meanings:-)

Questions "how much to Yaroslavsky station?" or "Почем поедем до Комсомольской?" have different answers for the price:-))))

I think in that case, the English would say 'Taken for a ride' which has more than one meaning! ;)

Yes, I agree - those who speak little of any foreign language when abroad can be subjected to what the English, I believe, also call 'Day Light Robbery' :book:

My Arabic is fairly OK, but the Egyptians are the worst for it! They are professionals at over-charging and frequently try to rip me off! :bash:

yakspeare
27-02-2012, 21:48
I think in that case, the English would say 'Taken for a ride' which has more than one meaning! ;)

Yes, I agree - those who speak little of any foreign language when abroad can be subjected to what the English, I believe, also call 'Day Light Robbery' :book:

My Arabic is fairly OK, but the Egyptians are the worst for it! They are professionals at over-charging and frequently try to rip me off! :bash:

well as they say, Al darahem marahem. money is cream(if you have money everything is ok)

sashadidi
28-02-2012, 02:18
Well, thats a start and better than uttering, "Ya ne Ponedelnik!" ;)

Keep that one for the traffic police when they want a bribe, they will think it pointless trying to get money from this foreign idiot idiot !!!!! (do not ask how I know!!)

Samodika
28-02-2012, 03:13
Keep that one for the traffic police when they want a bribe, they will think it pointless trying to get money from this foreign idiot idiot !!!!! (do not ask how I know!!)

I see this "Ya ne ponedelnik" is a very popular saying :) Before I could hear it from one of my colleagues only ))

TGP
01-03-2012, 02:24
FatAndy, you laugh but TGP told me that her former expat boss was ex-CIA officer who learnt russian in the american spies-shool. :))))

That is true. He was not studiying or working at the CIA building or something, of course, but it's not so important, is it? He was an air force officer and performed some other tasks :) Besides, he worked as an interpreter on the so called red line - when something urgent had to be discussed between the US and Russian presidents.

So, Gena, you see what source of information I have? I am still in contact with him ;)

TGP
01-03-2012, 02:28
Well, thats a start and better than uttering, "Ya ne Ponedelnik!" ;)

we say "Ya ne Kopengagen" when we do not understand or know something.

FatAndy
01-03-2012, 09:31
we say "Ya ne Kopengagen" when we do not understand or know something.
Да. Я не Копенгаген, а, скорее, Осло... :D

yakspeare
01-03-2012, 09:42
it's not ya ne puke-in-the-mayo?

FatAndy
01-03-2012, 09:51
it's not ya ne puke-in-the-mayo?
No. "Ya ne Kopengagen" - means I'm not specialist here, I don't understand details.
"a, skoree, Oslo" - more likely Oslo - has similar sound with osyol (donkey), means some kind of stupidity.
So generally you say it if you don't want to take responsibility or action in certain area or situation which is not very familiar to you.

weirdo
01-03-2012, 16:57
So much to remember! I would like to be using less formal speech, though.

So, you have to remember just two words, then: "Preevet" for hello, and "Pokka" for bye. That's it.

KiwiTess
02-03-2012, 13:48
So, you have to remember just two words, then: "Preevet" for hello, and "Pokka" for bye. That's it.

Well, I'm sorted then. Can throw out my phrase book and take Moscow by storm.

Sparafucile
02-03-2012, 14:01
So, you have to remember just two words, then: "Preevet" for hello, and "Pokka" for bye. That's it.

There was an Italian cyclist who cycled the whole way from Vladivostok to Moscow, knowing only the following 'Russian vocabulary':

'ZdoROvo!'
'poka'
'klyOvo!'
'zhOpa!'

tvadim133
02-03-2012, 21:42
Zhopa (crap, ass)was used more often, was not it?

Sparafucile
02-03-2012, 22:29
Zhopa (crap, ass)was used more often, was not it?

Probably yes, on a bicycle especially ;)

winner
03-03-2012, 14:45
Kiwi, better say more shortly. "Chavo tebe ? " or "Chto vam nado ?"

It would be sounding more natural.

In unoffical situation the russians try to speak more lakonically.

Уважаемый Геннадий, Вы даете иностранцам не совсем вежливые словосочетания.
"Chavo tebe ? " and "Chto vam nado ?" are not polite phrases.

AVKomarov
10-03-2012, 18:11
What is the translation of 'nu davai'?
nu - well
davai - let us, come on
nu davai - the translation depends on the situation
Farewell situation:
'nu davai' - Well, let us (realize that it is time to stop our farewells and it is time to go).
Tease situation:
'nu davai' - Well, let us (realize that it is time to try something).
Encourage situation:
'nu davai' - Come on. (Well, let us realize that it is time to stop waiting and start doing).

Mishutk
06-04-2012, 13:32
Actually, the best way to understand russian slogan is to speak with russians for a while.. :)):fridaysign:

Korotky Gennady
06-04-2012, 16:15
Уважаемый Геннадий, Вы даете иностранцам не совсем вежливые словосочетания.
"Chavo tebe ? " and "Chto vam nado ?" are not polite phrases.

Do you have a little bit of sense of humour ?

We should speak like russian people do... and don't use artificial literary expressions.

robertmf
06-04-2012, 17:37
we say "Ya ne Kopengagen" when we do not understand or know something.

Do you mean Copenhagen ? The Tokyo Japanese have similar. They say, Sapporo-Wakkanai when not understanding.

:elf:

robertmf
06-04-2012, 17:42
Actually, the best way to understand russian slogan is to speak with russians for a while.. :)):fridaysign:

There is also the comedy movie, "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming". American movie, with good Russian spoken.

The Russians Are Coming the Russians Are Coming (1966) - IMDb@@AMEPARAM@@http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTgzMzcyNTc3MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzM0NzI5NA@@._V1._SX93_SY140_.jpg@@AMEPARAM@@BMTgzMzcyNTc3MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzM0NzI5NA@@@@AMEPARAM@@SX93@@AMEPARAM@@SY140

robertmf
06-04-2012, 17:55
'Zdrasteee' or, if you have a kind of tension with the person, but want to be polite, 'zdrassss'
;)

It is very difficult to crook/twist tongue for a foreign spy in the very beginning, but then it gets easier and easiier, ask TolkoRaz, he'll confirm... :D

You mean trill the 'r'.

http://www.wikihow.com/Roll-Your-%22R%22s

BabyFirefly
06-04-2012, 17:55
Like others have said, you just need to practice more. Before I felt like I would get a stroke trying to pronounce some Russian words, now people say I don't have an accent for most words/phrases :-) Also, if you happen to know Spanish, I find Spanish has more in common with Russian than English to it's easier to compare the two.

One of my Russian teachers made me memorize quite a few Russian poems. It really helped me have better "flow" in speaking... it's easy for us foreigners to speak it like robots or with "no emotion" or rhythm. It really helped, maybe you should try that. Also, hang out with Russians. Better yet, date one, and bonus points if no one in his or her family speaks English.

BabyFirefly
06-04-2012, 18:00
You mean trill the 'r'.

http://www.wikihow.com/Roll-Your-%22R%22s


I'm a native Spanish speaker so I've known this since childhood... I do it a bit differently. I stick the tip of my tongue very close to, nearly touching, to the top of my mouth, and not very close to my gums, and then just breathe out (through the mouth of course). You have to keep trying out different tongue positions (how sexual would this be in any other conversation!), and see what works for you. It'll feel weird at first but you get used to it. But yes, some people just genetically cannot do it. Again, if you're learning to roll your "r"s then IMO it's better to practice with words that begin with "r"... so работат, not здравствуйте, and to make sure the "r" is next to a vowel rather than a consonant because the latter is more difficult.

robertmf
06-04-2012, 18:15
I'm a native Spanish speaker so I've known this since childhood... I do it a bit differently. .

Can you curl your tongue tip ? I was told it's a genetic thing. Ethnic Russians can do it and make the proper 'r' trill. I cannot, I fake it :farout:

FatAndy
06-04-2012, 18:21
Can you curl your tongue tip ? I was told it's a genetic thing. Ethnic Russians can do it and make the proper 'r' trill. I cannot, I fake it :farout:
As on of friends of friend of mine said - "каг'тавить у вас ещё получится, но грассировать - никогда..."? ;)
There is a small surgery operation, when surgeon cuts the "bridle" under the tongue, giving it more ability to move - maybe this can help?

BabyFirefly
06-04-2012, 18:22
Can you curl your tongue tip ? I was told it's a genetic thing. Ethnic Russians can do it and make the proper 'r' trill. I cannot, I fake it :farout:



Yep.

robertmf
06-04-2012, 20:16
As on of friends of friend of mine said - "каг'тавить у вас ещё получится, но грассировать - никогда..."? ;)
There is a small surgery operation, when surgeon cuts the "bridle" under the tongue, giving it more ability to move - maybe this can help?

Too many nerve endings in tongue for me to do this ..........

Arthuro
06-04-2012, 20:34
Yep.

For Spanish and Italians it's easy of course=)

winner
07-04-2012, 19:22
Do you have a little bit of sense of humour ?

We should speak like russian people do... and don't use artificial literary expressions.


Yes, I do. But why sense of humour ? Do you often hear "chavo tebe"? Where is such place?
Don't speak artificial Russian language, speak Great Russian language.

Samodika
07-04-2012, 19:30
Too many nerve endings in tongue for me to do this ..........



OMG!!
it's not a bridle...
I am a native russian, but still cannot pronounce 'r' 100% correct... )) and even do not care about it at all )

robertmf
07-04-2012, 19:58
OMG!!
it's not a bridle...
I am a native russian, but still cannot pronounce 'r' 100% correct... )) and even do not care about it at all )

Maybe you have lisp :question:



:punk:

Samodika
07-04-2012, 20:01
Maybe you have lisp :question:



:punk:

Nope! only cannot spell 'r' correctly :)

robertmf
07-04-2012, 20:05
Nope! only cannot spell 'r' correctly :)

:10189: "pronounce" not "spell" :question:

Samodika
07-04-2012, 20:08
:10189: "pronounce" not "spell" :question:




:bowdown: :)

robertmf
08-04-2012, 01:46
:bowdown: :)

You are most welcome Болшое спасибо :) Americans do not bow, so no need for you. ;)

Rich Wahl
08-04-2012, 12:03
This is a rather pointless question, but I'm curious. I'm aware that hello in Russian is pronounced 'zdra-stvooy-tye' and thank you is 'spa-see-ba', however to my (very unrefined) ear, it seems that about a quarter of people I greet or have passing conversation with quite clearly say 'zdra-stya' and/or 'pa-see-ba' instead.

I was just wondering, is this the result of regional/foreign accents or laziness in speech or similar to me saying 'hiya' in English - as Aussies and New Zealanders are prone to do?

Could be worse...every time that I learn a new phrase I hear that it is no longer used. I tried "Dobray Deen Gespizha (last name if female boss)" and I thought my director may have peed a little because she was laughing so hard. She asked me if I was using 300 year-old Russian books to study.

FatAndy
08-04-2012, 13:28
Then try to say hello my soul - privet, dusha moya. ;)

Samodika
08-04-2012, 15:50
Could be worse...every time that I learn a new phrase I hear that it is no longer used. I tried "Dobray Deen Gespizha (last name if female boss)" and I thought my director may have peed a little because she was laughing so hard. She asked me if I was using 300 year-old Russian books to study.

'Dobry den' is still in everyday use! I swear!
Change your teacher of Russian or books you use :)

Korotky Gennady
08-04-2012, 18:24
Yes, I do. But why sense of humour ? Do you often hear "chavo tebe"? Where is such place?

Don't speak artificial Russian language, speak Great Russian language.

Seems you are a bit snob... Where is the such place ? It's at my place. The place where I live.

I often use this phrase.

So don't restrict the russian vocabulary.

winner
08-04-2012, 18:29
'Dobry den' is still in everyday use! I swear!
Change your teacher of Russian or books you use :)

I agree. I use this phrase. A lot of people use it. Not children, not teenagers, but adults.

winner
08-04-2012, 18:48
Seems you are a bit snob... Where is the such place ? It's at my place. The place where I live.

I often use this phrase.

So don't restrict the russian vocabulary.

Yes, I am a snob. If you understand this word correctly, I don't mind.
I don't restrict the russian vocabulary. The words you recommend to use are not polite and not popular among well - educated people. It's MY opinion. Let foreigners decide how to speak Russian language: like intelligent, well - educated people or like opposites.
Amen.
And please note I don't mean you and people at your place are not well-educated or not intelligent:)

Rich Wahl
09-04-2012, 16:46
It is the "geshpizha" that they laugh at.

Korotky Gennady
10-04-2012, 13:52
And please note I don't mean you and people at your place are not well-educated or not intelligent:)

Of course, becoz you can't do it.

For sure the phrases I offered in the post you refered to... they are normal.

It's normal natural russian language. So it's even not clear for me what is wrong with them ?

If you don't want to speak them, it's your deal.

But don't forbid the expats to learn them.

winner
10-04-2012, 15:23
Of course, becoz you can't do it..
I can.


For sure the phrases I offered in the post you refered to... they are normal.. normal... for you...


It's normal natural russian language. .To swear is normal for some people too.

So it's even not clear for me what is wrong with them ?

And I have no time to explain what's wrong with them.


If you don't want to speak them, it's your deal..
Yes, it's my deal.


But don't forbid the expats to learn them.
I can't forbid the expats to learn them. I can only recommend not to use them:)
By the way, I wrote: It's my opinion. That's all.;)
I advanced my opinion.
You advanced your opinion.
Let's leave expats to decide.

Korotky Gennady
10-04-2012, 20:53
I can't forbid the expats to learn them. I can only recommend not to use them:)
By the way, I wrote: It's my opinion. That's all.;)
I advanced my opinion.
You advanced your opinion.
Let's leave expats to decide.

Hmm... of course it's their business what variant of russian language to speak. But if I were on their place I would prefer the live russian.

The language the millions of russian people speak.

Not artificial literary one.

winner
10-04-2012, 23:36
Hmm... of course it's their business what variant of russian language to speak. But if I were on their place I would prefer the live russian.

The language the millions of russian people speak.

Not artificial literary one.

You are English teacher, aren't you?

Do you teach English like this?:

aight, so i wuz in the backseat of ma mom's ML320 comming back from boxing and my dad(who is drivin) says to ma mom (who is in the passenger seat ) "the oil light came on" n he pulls into the nearest gas station. i think i wuz half asleep or somthin n ma dad goes inside the gas station n calls the guy out. My dad trys to pop the hood but he coudnt find the opener. i couldnt get out cuz ma foot wuz sprainedn the otha one wuz bruised. fo 20 minz they lookin fo da open(even da guy who worked at the gas station). n i couldnt talk cuz ma dad dont like lookin stupid. n im like holy **** u guyz r stupid. i got out n pulled the opener n they all are like "ohhhhhhh". then the mechanic took out the oil rod n thought it wuz for the transmission oil rod. n he spend 10 mintues tryin to fing anotha oil rod? how stupid is that. n i pulled out the one he pulled out earlier n showed him it unda light n he's like oooooo IM SRY

TravelWriter85
27-04-2012, 13:12
I can't train myself out of saying "pasiba" - and having lived in Ukraine for three years I say "sho" (що) instead of "shto" (что).

Is there a discussion on these forums about Russian regional accents?

yakspeare
27-04-2012, 13:22
Then you need to move to krasnodarskii krai...we do the ukrainian thing. Dialect down here is 70% ukrainian.

FatAndy
27-04-2012, 13:31
I can't train myself out of saying "pasiba" - and having lived in Ukraine for three years I say "sho" (що) instead of "shto" (что).

Is there a discussion on these forums about Russian regional accents?

Ukraine now is a kind of independent state... :D
But in Eastern area of it (where I was grown) there is also шо (sho) - it is "dialect" called суржик - mix of Russian and Ukrainian.

robertmf
28-04-2012, 01:12
Could be worse...every time that I learn a new phrase I hear that it is no longer used. I tried "Dobray Deen Gespizha

I think it was Fat Andy or maybe Judge who told me Gospoda/Gospodin Господа/Господин were coming back into form. Nominally they were used more before ye old revolution.

Dobry den' is used unless you are in Poland, where it is Den' dobry :rasta:

KatjaBg
28-04-2012, 11:28
I had the opportunity (privilege?) to have Russian/ Ukrainian bosses in my home country. It means I have rather good accent in my Russian.
So people are very suspicious when I say (with an almost clean accent) "Ya ne gavaru pa ruski"

But I love the how Russians build nicknames: Maria-> Masha -> Mash :); Ksenia-> Ksyusha -> Ksyush.
Very often my Russia colleagues call me Katichka.

TGP
29-04-2012, 23:52
I think it was Fat Andy or maybe Judge who told me Gospoda/Gospodin Господа/Господин were coming back into form. Nominally they were used more before ye old revolution.

Dobry den' is used unless you are in Poland, where it is Den' dobry :rasta:



Yes, gospoda are coming back... "Gospoda, don't urinate in the entrance hall"... :rules:

:jester:

robertmf
06-05-2012, 04:03
cyrillic :10241:

Jack17
06-05-2012, 08:17
You are English teacher, aren't you?

Do you teach English like this?:

aight, so i wuz in the backseat of ma mom's ML320 comming back from boxing and my dad(who is drivin) says to ma mom (who is in the passenger seat ) "the oil light came on" n he pulls into the nearest gas station. i think i wuz half asleep or somthin n ma dad goes inside the gas station n calls the guy out. My dad trys to pop the hood but he coudnt find the opener. i couldnt get out cuz ma foot wuz sprainedn the otha one wuz bruised. fo 20 minz they lookin fo da open(even da guy who worked at the gas station). n i couldnt talk cuz ma dad dont like lookin stupid. n im like holy **** u guyz r stupid. i got out n pulled the opener n they all are like "ohhhhhhh". then the mechanic took out the oil rod n thought it wuz for the transmission oil rod. n he spend 10 mintues tryin to fing anotha oil rod? how stupid is that. n i pulled out the one he pulled out earlier n showed him it unda light n he's like oooooo IM SRY
Ouu. . .You're good. I like that American English - feels like home.

KiwiTess
06-05-2012, 19:56
I had the opportunity (privilege?) to have Russian/ Ukrainian bosses in my home country. It means I have rather good accent in my Russian.
So people are very suspicious when I say (with an almost clean accent) "Ya ne gavaru pa ruski"

But I love the how Russians build nicknames: Maria-> Masha -> Mash :); Ksenia-> Ksyusha -> Ksyush.
Very often my Russia colleagues call me Katichka.

Oh, I also love the building of Russian nicknames, they're so nice. The little boy I nanny for calls me Tessushka and it absolutely melts my heart.

FatAndy
11-05-2012, 21:59
It is not nickname, it is уменьшительно-лакательное (diminutive-hypocoristic) ;) :thumbsup:

FatAndy
11-05-2012, 22:03
cyrillic :10241:
What's wrong, Rob? Cyrillic is always nice, it's your Latin barbarian symbols are pure disaster...:mad:

maricor
26-05-2012, 12:17
yes russian words is very confusing,, but now little by little m learning as well as my son,,hes now learning a very basic russian and many times he's correcting my pronounciation of sdrazt veety..to esdrazt vuytee...forgive my spelling:)

robertmf
26-05-2012, 15:24
It is not nickname, it is уменьшительно-лакательное (diminutive-hypocoristic) ;) :thumbsup:

Geez. I had to look that up.

Hypocorism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia