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The Roses
23-02-2012, 10:03
Can anyone recommend a great bakery (we are looking for good bread, not the naff crap in the supermarkets), within walking distance?

Many thanks!

Judge
23-02-2012, 11:23
There's a bakery at the top end ( John Bull Pub) Smolensky near 'Mir Pizza''..I don't know if it's any good,but worth a try.

Sparafucile
23-02-2012, 12:46
It might be a bit of a hoof, but there's a Volkonsky bakery at Bolshaya Sadovaya 2 (at Mayakovskaya, on the corner of Malaya Bronnaya and the Garden Ring). Fabulous bread, albeit at premium prices - and other baked goods too (biscuits, cakes, etc). Plus a small coffee room where you can enjoy a tea or coffee and a pastry.

Maybe not for everyday needs, but a nice treat?

Benedikt
23-02-2012, 13:19
Can anyone recommend a great bakery (we are looking for good bread, not the naff crap in the supermarkets), within walking distance?

Many thanks!

by far the best (however also prices to match).
And don't think all these -specialty- are making their doughs and mixes from scratch. no one has 8 bags with different seeds, 10 different types of flour and the like in the stores. and then mixes everything to their -own- recipe. Everyone is using pre mixes, add water,yeast and salt, and presto your bread is done. even Borodino, the most difficult bread, can be done this way.
that does not mean it is bad, but these breads are highly overpriced....

kiyashkj
24-02-2012, 17:11
Madame Boulanger on Nikitski Bld. Great bread, etc not expensive compared to Volkonsky.

The Roses
26-02-2012, 19:11
Madame Boulanger on Nikitski Bld. Great bread, etc not expensive compared to Volkonsky.

Went there today. Perfect, thanks.

Pastafarian
26-02-2012, 22:08
A chain with good bread and pastries, not too expensive (still Moscow priced): Le Pain Quotidien.

Periwinkle
27-02-2012, 11:03
A chain with good bread and pastries, not too expensive (still Moscow priced): Le Pain Quotidien.
The one near Arbat had hit or miss bread. Often it was stale in the morning - probably using up yesterday's bread. Had better luck at other locations.

sashasasha
13-03-2012, 17:33
I usually takу a bread in "Хлеб насущный" that situated at the corner of Sadovoe and N. Arbat, try you too :rolleyes:

robertmf
13-03-2012, 18:49
And don't think all these -specialty- are making their doughs and mixes from scratch. no one has 8 bags with different seeds, 10 different types of flour and the like in the stores. and then mixes everything to their -own- recipe. Everyone is using pre mixes, add water,yeast and salt, and presto your bread is done. even Borodino, the most difficult bread, can be done this way.
that does not mean it is bad, but these breads are highly overpriced....

"хлеб" becomes very technical to bake 'from scratch' :)

Russian black bread (http://stason.org/TULARC/food/sourdough-recipes/210-Russian-Black-Bread.html)



Therefore, in Russian bread the amount of sourness is roughly propor-
tional to the quantity of rye flour. Here are some ratios of rye and
wheat flour and the suggested acid level :

Name Rye:Wheat Degrees of Acid
Plain Whole Rye 100:0 12
Borodino 85:15 10

Ukrainian types: 50:50 9
20:80 7.5

The conclusion to be drawn is that a full rise with a real Russian
culture will produce a sour bread, which would only be considered tasty
and normal in the case of a high percentage of rye dough.

II. A sample recipe for Borodino bread.

The following general recipe has worked well for me. It is based on
the booklet Household Bread (Domashnii khleb. Moscow: 1991). The
amounts are approximate. It is assumed that an active sour starter is
ready.

1. Put 2 cups of whole rye flour (finely ground is easier to knead) in
a mixing bowl and pour 20 ounces (0.6 liter) of nearly boiling water over the
flour. Add 1 teaspoon of ground coriander seed and 4 tablespoons of
malt syrup. Mix thoroughly and let cool to around 85 degrees F (30C)

2. When the mixture is at 85 deg., add 1/2 cup of the sourdough start-
er. If the starter is too weak to raise the dough, you could add com-
mercial yeast also at this point. Let this mixture sit for 10-12 hours
at around 85 degrees F.

3. Add 2 teaspoons of salt to the mixture and mix well. Add 1 cup of
whole wheat flour and mix. Continue to add rye flour (around 3-4 cups)
until it can be kneaded without too much sticking. Sprinkling the
surface with cold water or a little vegetable oil helps hasten this
process. Shape and smooth loaves, using water. (I get 2 small loaves
out of this quantity.)

4. Proof the shaped loaves around 1 1/2 - 2 hrs., or until it doesn't
rise anymore.

5. Bake at around 325 deg. F. (160C) for 2 hours.

Read more: http://stason.org/TULARC/food/sourdough-recipes/211-Notes-on-Russian-Sourdough-Bread.html#ixzz1p0YFz5yX