PDA

View Full Version : Can natives teach beginners etc



Bels
22-09-2007, 22:41
I promised I would start a new thread on a particular subject here.

Can English native speaking teachers teach Russians grammar without being fluent in the Russian language?
Which level can they teach? Can they teach young children and teenagers at beginner or Elementary level.

What method do you teach? is it grammar, grammar, grammer. Is it to concentrate on one area such as pronounciation and speaking practise. Or do you teach the Cambridge method. Do you believe in teaching all skills at the same time? READING WRITING SPEAKING LISTENING

I am sure all teachers strive to learn and improve their teaching throughout their whole career. They are never satisfied.

quincy
23-09-2007, 12:27
interest in and some knowledge of the language of your students is bound to came in handy.

Bels
23-09-2007, 14:38
An interest in all languages is a great help. Understanding Russian most certainly and my Russian wife as a linguist and a mentor to me has been of great help. However we both believe in keeping Russian communication to a minimum in teaching English.

th&vk
23-09-2007, 18:46
Having a knowledge of Russian certainly helps here. But I taught Adult Beginners in the United States, in a multilingual class (everything from Egyptian Arabic to Haitian French to Vietnamese, with the occasional Russian - my one and only second language beyond high school French) and, if I do say so myself, my students did great. I've probably never worked so hard in my life as a teacher - but probably also never been so gratified by the results.

But admittedly that's a situation of necessity ... it's great if a teacher knows the 1st language of the student ... but I think that 1st language use in the classroom should be very limited ... a little for emergency clarification, a little for comfort ... but keep it English

I admit, I do teach kids at all ... so my comments may be only appropriate for adult learners ... I don't know ... anyone out there have thoughts on that? P.S. Thanks Bels for launching an interesting thread.

Bels
23-09-2007, 19:07
Yes. I am certain that the UK is one of the biggest for teaching EFL to foreigners. And they must teach to students of many languages. If anything it is benificial for students to be unable to communicate in their first and are forced to use English. I have had the pleasure of experiencing this in British Summer schools.

I have and still am teaching pure beginners and have great pleasure in seeing the results within a few weeks. In fact I prefer it if I develop my students from the beginning. Hence the myth that Russian teachers are the best for teaching beginners has been destroyed. After a bit of uncertainty I know that the parents of my pupils will have nothing else but a native speaking teacher. But in some cases a Russian assistant may be useful, but they must restrain themselves, ie; dont translate red and car for Krastne or Macheena when the pictures are right in front of the children. Children are only just developing their first language, And how are they learning this first language??? Therefore they don't need constant translation from Russian to English. It is common that these children will learn to read, tell the time, know the months, years, and seasons before they have learnt it in Russian.

They may well know the English alphabet before the Russian.

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 19:09
I am just a student, not teacher. I am completely for native English teachers without a smattering of Russian. But I doubt if they can cope with beginners. THe gap is too wide, contact not good enough.

The higher level, the more effective contact between native teacher and student.
I studied English with Russian teacher up to intermediate level and realised that it must be a native teacher on higher levels. Nowadays I have another problem. They say - your English is good, what would you like else, I am not sure if I could help you.
And I answer: I need only 3 things - practice, practice and one more practice. :-)))

Bels
23-09-2007, 19:12
One interesting advantage point for those teachers who are currently teaching only adults. To guarantee filling your hours throughout a day you will need the kids and teenagers. In most cases adults are for evenings and weekends. Children don't go to school in Russia until they are six or older in Russia and the hours are often short. For teenagers the school day is short also.

Bels
23-09-2007, 19:15
I am just a student, not teacher. I am completely for native English teachers without a smattering of Russian. But I doubt if they can cope with beginners. THe gap is too wide, contact not good enough.

The higher level, the more effective contact between native teacher and student.
I studied English with Russian teacher up to intermediate level and realised that it must be a native teacher on higher levels. Nowadays I have another problem. They say - your English is good, what would you like else, I am not sure if I could help you.
And I answer: I need only 3 things - practice, practice and one more practice. :-)))

When did you start learning English?

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 19:23
When did you start learning English?

At the institute.
Than at postgaduate courses.
Than some practice during my sci. work (I am Ph.D. in Physics)
Than I had one private teacher.
Than I did Intermediate
Then I did Upper intermediate
Than I did Advanced 3 times (3 different books)
Than I had 3 different native teachers (in succession)
Now I am having language exchange with natives.
My dream is to do CPE course with native-just for pleasure.

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 19:27
Sorry for my misprints, Bels

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 19:34
Why am I obsessed with English?
Example:
"He rushed out like a greased lightning"

Isn't it really beautiful, Bels?

quincy
23-09-2007, 20:01
An interest in all languages is a great help. Understanding Russian most certainly and my Russian wife as a linguist and a mentor to me has been of great help. However we both believe in keeping Russian communication to a minimum in teaching English.

Is English communication in UK schools teaching French, German (and the occasional Russian) kept out as much as possible?

Bels
23-09-2007, 20:14
Is English communication in UK schools teaching French, German (and the occasional Russian) kept out as much as possible?


Unfortuanately No. Just the same as Russian is not cut out of Russian state schools.

Bels
23-09-2007, 20:16
At the institute.
Than at postgaduate courses.
Than some practice during my sci. work (I am Ph.D. in Physics)
Than I had one private teacher.
Than I did Intermediate
Then I did Upper intermediate
Than I did Advanced 3 times (3 different books)
Than I had 3 different native teachers (in succession)
Now I am having language exchange with natives.
My dream is to do CPE course with native-just for pleasure.

When ????

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 20:26
When ????

During the last 25 years.

Bels
23-09-2007, 21:09
During the last 25 years.

Thank you for the information Audrey :) But I still have't got what I am looking for. I won't ask for your age but how old were you when you started learning English.

You have got me interested, as I have only ever met one student who has passed CPE. They say in order to qualify for this exam you must take great interest and enjoy English literature and English speaking movies without sub-titles. A lot of English communication in your way of life or work would help also. It is stated that you are educated native speaking level when you pass this test.

Have you ever thought of IELTS to get level 9 instead?

I must admit, you may be capable of passing this test yourself. There are self teaching course books available in which will help you be aware of what to expect in the exam. You can also practise your language with any native speaker. My guess is that you already have access to using the English 50% of the time in the work you do. Or perhaps you travel a lot.

hka
23-09-2007, 21:32
Hi Bels,
I passed CPE some seventeen years ago - after two years of learning English and living in the UK (was a first year undergrad). So it is possible. But...
Then for many years I was preparing students for FCE, CAE and CPE - and I absolutey agree with you - while the first two are geared towards testing language ability almost purely, an 'uneducated' person would never be able to pass CPE. And you certainly need life experience to pass and be well-read and informed in all areas of life. I would almost go as far as saying you need some university education to pass (might be wrong, it's just a feeling).
Go for it Andrey, it's a challenge and great fun.

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 21:33
Thank you for the information Audrey :) But I still have't got what I am looking for. I won't ask for your age but how old were you when you started learning English.

You have got me interested, as I have only ever met one student who has passed CPE. They say in order to qualify for this exam you must take great interest and enjoy English literature and English speaking movies without sub-titles. A lot of English communication in your way of life or work would help also. It is stated that you are educated native speaking level when you pass this test.

Have you ever thought of IELTS to get level 9 instead?

I must admit, you may be capable of passing this test yourself. There are self teaching course books available in which will help you be aware of what to expect in the exam. You can also practise your language with any native speaker. My guess is that you already have access to using the English 50% of the time in the work you do. Or perhaps you travel a lot.

My English studies is patchy and continue since early 1980s. I was born in 1961. Old duck!!! Are you satisfied? :-)))

I am not interested in passing these tests (formally speaking, Ph.D. degree is considered to be all-inclusive :-)). I love English itself, including culture. When you are practcing it with natives, you are getting enough. I also read smth in English, and watch CNN, BBC and others everyday. But I am not fluent anough.
Travel is also inrestesting, and I do, but strangely, it doesn't provide enough practice.

BTW what I am going to do right now is listening "Jerusalem" through YouTube, ang sing along. I have already printed out the lyrics.
I am really mad about English. Or, maybe, even in general... :-)))

THank you for your attention

AndreyS
23-09-2007, 21:36
Hi Bels,
I passed CPE some seventeen years ago - after two years of learning English and living in the UK (was a first year undergrad). So it is possible. But...
Then for many years I was preparing students for FCE, CAE and CPE - and I absolutey agree with you - while the first two are geared towards testing language ability almost purely, an 'uneducated' person would never be able to pass CPE. And you certainly need life experience to pass and be well-read and informed in all areas of life. I would almost go as far as saying you need some university education to pass (might be wrong, it's just a feeling).
Go for it Andrey, it's a challenge and great fun.

Thank you. I realise.

Bels
23-09-2007, 21:57
It's nice to see some Russians passing CPE. I said to one myself how can I possibly help you. However it's not common as I have only met one. Most that come to me are generally Upper intermediate level with weaknesses of pronounciation and verbal communication.

As I said I prefer beginners at the moment and hopefully will develop them from beginner to at least advanced. I find this very satisfying, and I already have some who are now pre-intermediate level from children to now young teenagers. This is an example of when I love my job.

hka
23-09-2007, 22:16
I'm not Russian, sorry.

hka
23-09-2007, 22:20
And I think it's very, very hard to prepare students for high level exams because you hardly notice any development, it's all very subtle. I don't think it's really possible for a teacher to prepare someone for CPE, apart from the technical part of it maybe - otherwise it's more of a self-development kind of thing, like reading the papers etc.
You get much more job satisfaction with lower level students, it's easier to see their improvement.

Bels
23-09-2007, 22:23
My English studies is patchy and continue since early 1980s. I was born in 1961. Old duck!!! Are you satisfied? :-)))

I am not interested in passing these tests (formally speaking, Ph.D. degree is considered to be all-inclusive :-)). I love English itself, including culture. When you are practcing it with natives, you are getting enough. I also read smth in English, and watch CNN, BBC and others everyday. But I am not fluent anough.
Travel is also inrestesting, and I do, but strangely, it doesn't provide enough practice.

BTW what I am going to do right now is listening "Jerusalem" through YouTube, ang sing along. I have already printed out the lyrics.
I am really mad about English. Or, maybe, even in general... :-)))

THank you for your attention

Then I must be a much older duck :) I was born in 1955

Bels
23-09-2007, 22:29
And I think it's very, very hard to prepare students for high level exams because you hardly notice any development, it's all very subtle. I don't think it's really possible for a teacher to prepare someone for CPE, apart from the technical part of it maybe - otherwise it's more of a self-development kind of thing, like reading the papers etc.
You get much more job satisfaction with lower level students, it's easier to see their improvement.


You have made my point clearer, that it is very satisfying teaching young beginners because you see and feel the results in a short period of time. It's what's great seeing this developement as being a teacher.

However there are teachers and student course books available which you may find interesting in CPE. And as stated there are self teaching ones.
Try longmans.com in the catologue for all course books.

Bels
25-09-2007, 21:52
I'm not Russian, sorry.

OOps sorry. And damn the other one I met was Polish. Are there any Russians who passed CPE or level 9 in IELTS? I see you are Hungarian now.

What do you think. Are Russians slow in the English language in comparison to other Europeans.

Bels
26-09-2007, 22:21
Having a knowledge of Russian certainly helps here. But I taught Adult Beginners in the United States, in a multilingual class (everything from Egyptian Arabic to Haitian French to Vietnamese, with the occasional Russian - my one and only second language beyond high school French) and, if I do say so myself, my students did great. I've probably never worked so hard in my life as a teacher - but probably also never been so gratified by the results.

But admittedly that's a situation of necessity ... it's great if a teacher knows the 1st language of the student ... but I think that 1st language use in the classroom should be very limited ... a little for emergency clarification, a little for comfort ... but keep it English

I admit, I do teach kids at all ... so my comments may be only appropriate for adult learners ... I don't know ... anyone out there have thoughts on that? P.S. Thanks Bels for launching an interesting thread.

I believe you made some good points in which teachers will be in total agreement with you. First, to teach groups of multi languages has its advantages of that they have to communicate in the English language. Because they have no choice and must speak English.

Why aren't you interested in teaching children. It's very satisfying and you see results very quickly. Hard work though.

Secondly students for example all Russians. I have a limited knowledge of Russian but have a Russian wife who is a linguist as a partner. She has taught me a lot over the past four years. Understanderstanding what problems Russians may have is very important. However we both believe in pressing students for communication and proper pronounciation from day one.
We believe in the Cambridge system of teaching all four skills at the same time, Reading, writing, listening and writing.

Bels
01-11-2007, 21:30
I am just a student, not teacher. I am completely for native English teachers without a smattering of Russian. But I doubt if they can cope with beginners. THe gap is too wide, contact not good enough.

The higher level, the more effective contact between native teacher and student.
I studied English with Russian teacher up to intermediate level and realised that it must be a native teacher on higher levels. Nowadays I have another problem. They say - your English is good, what would you like else, I am not sure if I could help you.
And I answer: I need only 3 things - practice, practice and one more practice. :-)))

In regards to your your quote in bold above Andrey, and in answer to another post.

Teaching English to young children beginners starting from the age of four is no problem for a native speaking teacher with no Russian. In fact I have proven to many parents in my area that it's the best way.

For example, red is red, a car is a car, yellow is yellow, Abig ball is a big is a big ball, a girland a boy is a boy and a girl and so forth. You can see it. So you invite a parent or a Russian teacher in and she/he as you demonnstrate red and he shouts translation of krastne, or car car macheena. or a child asks you to look at his home work and the teacher says smartree. It has a negative slow reaction.

In fact if I have invited a Russian teacher to the class the progress slows down, their game in English stops. They start asking the Russian questions in Russian. It doesn't work and the lessons are ruined, their fast progress stops.

It works best if the children believe they are playing a game , that is talking to an English native who does't know Russian. And they love the fact that they are talking to the native speaker within a few weeks. They love the game and it works. And they adapt much faster than adult beginners for example.

Those teachers who say I will only teach adults I can't understand. With children you see results every week, but you can't see that kind of progress with adults learning from intermediate level to upper intermediate for example.

Yes there are greater classroom management skills required with children and teenager, where as there are rarely classroom management skills required with adults. Unless you came across Sal of course:)

Clean32
01-11-2007, 21:44
Thank you. I realise.

LOL you have to come to paint ball, if anyone can keep up with my slang, innuendos, word play, and double meanings, is well advanced in English, and good on them as well.

on think I have noticed is that there is a lot of English out there, but many Russians have a Fear of trying to use it, yet the same people are happy when I speak Russian, its just the same, any one who speaks English to me is going to get my time

Rustralian
02-11-2007, 21:04
What you now need then AndreyS, is to diversify and learn some more interesting deriviants of English.

I used to practice as a lawyer (Barrister and Solicitor) in Australia and the English language was fun to use, as you have to develop different ways of both writing and speaking to convey the required message - and often you just have to use the most obscure and obnoxious worlds to sound like a complete pratt, so that the other person was intimidated.

The really fun part though is using slang, which fortunately we use a lot of in Australia and in nearly all levels of society. Even in court many of these things are still used as they express very clear thoughts in Australia.

The classic:
Gidday mate, howisya?
Seeya mate, avagoodweegend!
She'll be right!
Seeya s'arvo! (See you this afternoon)
Bonza!
Mad as a cut snake.
Bugger me dead!
Don't be a galah!
What a wally!
Not on your Nelly.
Chuck a wobbly (or chuck a fit).
Out the back of the black stump.
Fair dinkum mate!
Don't be a drongo!
He couldn't run a chook raffle in a pub.
Avagoyamug!
He's a bit snakey today.
Back of Bourke.
He was spitting chips.
He's been on the turps again.
You know, the thingummybob (or the doover)!
It's had the dick!
Pigs in space (Police spotter planes).
He's on a good wicket.
Flat out like a lizard drinking.
As pissed as a parrot.
What a ratbag he is!
Bald as a bandicoot.
He went walkabout.
Stone the crows.
**** me drunk!
Give it some herbs (actually means to go faster).
He looked like a stunned mullet!
They're a bunch of blow ins.
Giveusasquizz!

:eek: :eh:


Then there is rhyming slang:
Howsya cheese and kisses (how is your wife).
Can I use ya dog 'n bone (can I use your telephone).
She's butchers hook today (she is crook [not well] today or it may mean that she [which could refer to anything - car, dog, any machinery] isn't working).
Horse's hoof (poof - as in gay).
Half back flanker (wanker).
Noah's Ark (shark).

:wazzup:

It goes on forever, but the reality is anybody going to Australia (even English first language people) often have no idea what we are saying in Australia, so for the English as a second language people, it can be lots of fun

:hooray:

Of course, if you go to visit Clean's ancestors (in Kiwi land), you need to have an understanding of Fush and Chups and Suxty Sux and Oral Sux. And if you see sheep wearing wellies (Wellington boots) don't let the children see what the farmer does to them! :drink::drink:

Bye for now.
:wavey:

Clean32
02-11-2007, 21:10
Of course, if you go to visit Clean's ancestors (in Kiwi land), you need to have an understanding of Fush and Chups and Suxty Sux and Oral Sux. And if you see sheep wearing wellies (Wellington boots) don't let the children see what the farmer does to them! :drink::drink:Bye for now.
:wavey:

OK oK what ever, and the aussie virsion is SEXTY SEX and oril SEX, any way all the sheep imigrated for aussie to NZ, didnt like the aussies not at all,

Rustralian
02-11-2007, 21:17
Now now Clean, we all know about Kiwi land (much like Tasmania actually):

Q: Do you know the definition of a Tasmanian virgin?

A: A girl than can run faster then her father and brother!

:fridaysign:

Bels
02-11-2007, 22:01
LOL you have to come to paint ball, if anyone can keep up with my slang, innuendos, word play, and double meanings, is well advanced in English, and good on them as well.

on think I have noticed is that there is a lot of English out there, but many Russians have a Fear of trying to use it, yet the same people are happy when I speak Russian, its just the same, any one who speaks English to me is going to get my time

Yes play with English, think about it in your own language. Are you perfect when you speak? No. It's the same in English.e Don't be afraid to make mistakes, is fluency in English perfect. OOH . err, um or what I mean to say, may I correct myself etc. But you must make sure you are understood. No! No! That's not what I mean. Can you please clarify what you have just said?

Back to English with children. John! Smartree! look at my doma robota,please.
Why not? mix al ittle Russian with English with Russian, it,s ok, and it's fun for the kids. It's productive.

Bels
02-11-2007, 22:28
OK oK what ever, and the aussie virsion is SEXTY SEX and oril SEX, any way all the sheep imigrated for aussie to NZ, didnt like the aussies not at all,

Always good to understand an Aussie, New Zealander, American , and even perhaps a West Indian. If you have seen previous posts you have also seen versions of Asian English. Now haw about British English slang , or prhrasal verbs are they the same?

It's nice to see that the legal system is so interesting in Australia, it appears so appropriate, and precise in England. In fact boring.

Bels
02-11-2007, 22:35
Now now Clean, we all know about Kiwi land (much like Tasmania actually):

Q: Do you know the definition of a Tasmanian virgin?

A: A girl than can run faster then her father and brother!

:fridaysign:

I'm just curious, :) are Aussies like Brits versus French in Great Britain, do you act like neighbours, or do you always argue with each other like we do.

Rustralian
02-11-2007, 23:16
We are not as bad as the Brits and the Froggies. We treat the Kiwis like the poor cousins - after all, you have to feel sorry for them ... all those years of inter breeding on a very small island ... very similar to the European Royals in reality :nut:

:hooray:

Bels
02-11-2007, 23:38
And the Froggies which we always beat even though the have a bigger country and yet they out numbered us. Done troughout history.

The country that failed us in Dunkirk to defeat the Germans? they the French weren't there, were they , Aaaah! The so called alliance.
So the Germans walked into France without a fight. Yikes! disgusting.

Clean32
03-11-2007, 13:29
Aussie Vers Kiwi, LOL any way the aussies are all ex crims deported to aussie any way, and the sheep shaging thing well thats just them trying to divert attention from themselfs realy.

Bels its like this, aussies have names for them selfs as well, queensland = banna benders etc
english are all poms, becouse thay got of the boat in aussie stinking, englsih didnt wash much, ( and many still doint), but calling a pom a pom is not problem, call in a pom a bloody pommy wanker, means somthing LOL

but aussied would suport the alback before suporting the lions. hell thay would suport the frogs before suporting the lions.

but to sum it up aussies and kiwi slag each othere a lot but it means nothing realy just sounds seriouse to poms and otheres

Rustralian
03-11-2007, 16:34
Clean is correct, as much as we give them shite - we still have the history of ANZACS, as the most revered thing in Australia, and that refers to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps - countries that die together are forever allowed to give each other shite!

:ninja:

It also is a way for Russians to get to Australia - go via NZ. Once you have your NZ citizenship just catch a plane across to Australia and you are welcomed as one of our own - you even get social security benefits (after a short waiting peridod these days I think though).

:rasta:

Bels
03-11-2007, 17:21
Aussie Vers Kiwi, LOL any way the aussies are all ex crims deported to aussie any way, and the sheep shaging thing well thats just them trying to divert attention from themselfs realy.

Bels its like this, aussies have names for them selfs as well, queensland = banna benders etc
english are all poms, becouse thay got of the boat in aussie stinking, englsih didnt wash much, ( and many still doint), but calling a pom a pom is not problem, call in a pom a bloody pommy wanker, means somthing LOL

but aussied would suport the alback before suporting the lions. hell thay would suport the frogs before suporting the lions.

but to sum it up aussies and kiwi slag each othere a lot but it means nothing realy just sounds seriouse to poms and otheres

And I thought we were were called Limies or a limy. And I Think the Brits still call the Australians ex-convicts.

Clean32
03-11-2007, 17:44
And I thought we were were called Limies or a limy. And I Think the Brits still call the Australians ex-convicts.

Na the yanks call poms Limies

Rustralian, the NZ door to aussie has been closed for a few years now, same english test etc. only thing is NZ hasint the state sponcer bit.

Bigest number of immigrants to NZ, are australians.
bigest number of immigrants to aussie are Kiwis ( i think)

and by the way there are more aussie dole blugers in NZ than kiwi blugers in aussie LOL, at the moment.

Rustralian
03-11-2007, 19:03
And I thought we were were called Limies or a limy. And I Think the Brits still call the Australians ex-convicts.

I thought the Poms were much more polite to the Aussies than that ... after all, if they start getting rude we might stop taking them into Australia and then they will have nowhere else to go and when they are polite enough, we let them win a few games of cricket here and there ...

Clean is correct however :bowdown:

The US call the British Limey's, the Australians call the British Poms and the Australians call the US Yanks.

Depending on how you are feeling, Yanks has two meanings:

1. Just what it says - Yank, the slang form for the US; and
2. If you are a little annoyed with the US (like when they keep trying to start WWIII) it is rhyming slang: Septic Tank rhymes with Yank.

And if you don't know what a septic tank is, it is a concrete (these days plastic) cylinder located underground in locations where there are no sewers, that naturally treats waste from toilets (so it is full of shit) ie. Yank = full of shit!

The only problem with the Kiwi visitors to Aus is that you have given us all your Maori rugby players that like to play social rugby, but don't yet know how to lose ... we have more violence in social touch rugby (non contact) with Maoris than in a boxing match - even some of the Maori shielas can deliver a knockout punch ... :bash:

:coffee:

Clean32
03-11-2007, 19:21
The only problem with the Kiwi visitors to Aus is that you have given us all your Maori rugby players that like to play social rugby, but don't yet know how to lose ... we have more violence in social touch rugby (non contact) with Maoris than in a boxing match - even some of the Maori shielas can deliver a knockout punch ... :bash:

:coffee:


LOL true, ll the good maori rugby plyers are in Japam, france or italy, playing. 3 gold bars a game LOL. next wave of players will be Samoan, there chicks start off at 120KG and growing. no crap.

Rustralian
03-11-2007, 19:30
That is a scary thought!

:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

Rustralian
03-11-2007, 19:42
For those that are interested in learning about particular words in the English language this is a very good link. It is rather old, but still gets a laugh and as it is a video with sound, it is much better than just tying to read.

http://thatvideosite.com/video/637

:bookworm: :eek: :ignore: :applause:

Clean32
03-11-2007, 19:46
Oh funny story. In NZ my wife heads of to church. being a good russian girl that she is, dressed accordingly etc.

she comes home looking a but stunned, so i ask.
she was siting when 2 Masive beings sat in the row infrount of her, oblitiring all view and most of the light, she sit though the service unable to see any thing, and woundering why these 2 men if fround of her were so big? she understood that Smoian men would wear Flax woven skirts to church as is correct for there custom. she was even more shocked when she realised the all the men were on one side and all the women were on the othere side of the church. sevices finished a couple of skinny guys came over and kiss these mobile mountains, there convisation followed has the skinny husbands were taliking to there seated wifes.

more so becouse my wife is about 52KG driping wet

Pyotr
16-12-2007, 02:25
What you now need then AndreyS, is to diversify and learn some more interesting deriviants of English.

I used to practice as a lawyer (Barrister and Solicitor) in Australia and the English language was fun to use, as you have to develop different ways of both writing and speaking to convey the required message - and often you just have to use the most obscure and obnoxious worlds to sound like a complete pratt, so that the other person was intimidated.

The really fun part though is using slang, which fortunately we use a lot of in Australia and in nearly all levels of society. Even in court many of these things are still used as they express very clear thoughts in Australia.

The classic:
Gidday mate, howisya?
Seeya mate, avagoodweegend!
She'll be right!
Seeya s'arvo! (See you this afternoon)
Bonza!
Mad as a cut snake.
Bugger me dead!
Don't be a galah!
What a wally!
Not on your Nelly.
Chuck a wobbly (or chuck a fit).
Out the back of the black stump.
Fair dinkum mate!
Don't be a drongo!
He couldn't run a chook raffle in a pub.
Avagoyamug!
He's a bit snakey today.
Back of Bourke.
He was spitting chips.
He's been on the turps again.
You know, the thingummybob (or the doover)!
It's had the dick!
Pigs in space (Police spotter planes).
He's on a good wicket.
Flat out like a lizard drinking.
As pissed as a parrot.
What a ratbag he is!
Bald as a bandicoot.
He went walkabout.
Stone the crows.
**** me drunk!
Give it some herbs (actually means to go faster).
He looked like a stunned mullet!
They're a bunch of blow ins.
Giveusasquizz!

:eek: :eh:


Then there is rhyming slang:
Howsya cheese and kisses (how is your wife).
Can I use ya dog 'n bone (can I use your telephone).
She's butchers hook today (she is crook [not well] today or it may mean that she [which could refer to anything - car, dog, any machinery] isn't working).
Horse's hoof (poof - as in gay).
Half back flanker (wanker).
Noah's Ark (shark).

:wazzup:

It goes on forever, but the reality is anybody going to Australia (even English first language people) often have no idea what we are saying in Australia, so for the English as a second language people, it can be lots of fun

:hooray:

Of course, if you go to visit Clean's ancestors (in Kiwi land), you need to have an understanding of Fush and Chups and Suxty Sux and Oral Sux. And if you see sheep wearing wellies (Wellington boots) don't let the children see what the farmer does to them! :drink::drink:

Bye for now.
:wavey:

These expressions aren't used much in Australia apart from by simple people and drunks. It's like a watered down version of Russian "mat".

Nevertheless, people advertise this kind of lexicon as a kind of compensation that Australia has no real culture.

Sure it has a short history and plenty of accomplished people, but the short story is that it is naked of culture.

Maybe this is a good thing, as no-one takes the idea of "Australia" too seriously, unlike Russia with its farcical 9 May holiday, or America and whatever holiday they delight in.

Promulgating Australian slang is a sign of deep insecurity.

The most important thing that Australians should be proud of, is that the system works, and we have no reason to grovel and dribble and plead love for our country.

It's a progressive (in some ways) administrative unit. As an Australian, I'm happy to pay taxes there and be seen by competent doctors and judged by a (more or less) competent judicial system.

It's great, but I certainly don't love it or advocate its sloppy language and slimy media.

As long as Australia remains competent in its governance, I'll remain a citizen...

...but to love one's country — one must have deep psychological problems.