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sylvia24
30-10-2011, 18:24
2day was great in church.i had fun.if u wana come along next tym,write me

robertmf
30-10-2011, 18:26
2day was great in church.i had fun.if u wana come along next tym,write me

Где ? What church denomination :question:

tvadim133
30-10-2011, 21:53
2day was great in church.i had fun.if u wana come along next tym,write me

Did you have a two days party in the church?

What did they serve?

rusmeister
30-10-2011, 21:59
Was it the church of Christ the Savior on Kropotkinskaya, by chance? Or the church next to McDonald's across from the Central Telegraph (Okhotny Ryad)? The latter gets wild at times, I hear...

sylvia24
31-10-2011, 13:48
its christ embassy close to my school rudn....ur welcome next sunday if ur interested.

rusmeister
31-10-2011, 13:51
its christ embassy close to my school rudn....ur welcome next sunday if ur interested.
I'm Orthodox, thanks, and consider my own church (and Church) to be pretty amazing. :)

For me, a religion makes sense in history and must make sense of history. I only see two Churches that could possibly do that, and only one that actually does.

mds45
31-10-2011, 14:10
I'm Orthodox, thanks, and consider my own church (and Church) to be pretty amazing. :)

For me, a religion makes sense in history and must make sense of history. I only see two Churches that could possibly do that, and only one that actually does.

This is a nice change from the huge passages you usually write and so I read it - what a mistake !! Utter gibberish !! Please continue to write 100's of paragraphs so that I know to skip it in future.

rusmeister
31-10-2011, 19:47
This is a nice change from the huge passages you usually write and so I read it - what a mistake !! Utter gibberish !! Please continue to write 100's of paragraphs so that I know to skip it in future.
I guess it depends on your attention span and ability to think about what the person you disagree with has said and to show how it is wrong - if it IS - or to modify your own arguments if you are wrong so that most intelligent people would agree with you.

But if you're part of the large number of people that can't handle more than soundbites, by all means don't read my posts...

mds45
01-11-2011, 09:41
I guess it depends on your attention span and ability to think about what the person you disagree with has said and to show how it is wrong - if it IS - or to modify your own arguments if you are wrong so that most intelligent people would agree with you.

But if you're part of the large number of people that can't handle more than soundbites, by all means don't read my posts...

No Russmeister it depends on my attention span and tollerance to pure drivel.

rusmeister
01-11-2011, 12:34
No Russmeister it depends on my attention span and tollerance to pure drivel.

It is easy to dispose of anyone's ideas by assertion - such as declaring them to be drivel. I can say that Shakespeare was an idiot who wrote nonsense and that Einstein didn't know what he was talking about. It is easy, but not intelligent, to do that. For people can read them and decide for themselves. I would not class myself on the level of those geniuses in their fields, or even with my favorite Chesterton. But it is evident to me that there are levels of ordinary intelligence, below genius, and levels below that of ordinary intelligence. Unintelligence might even become ordinary. But it is the power to prove by argument and intelligent rhetoric - a lost art in our day - that demonstrates intelligence, not mere assertion.

I prefer a religion that holds intelligence in a place of respect and has a developed theology to a lack of one that dismisses what it disagrees with by mere assertion. The former is demonstrably more intelligent.

xSnoofovich
01-11-2011, 12:46
it depends on my attention span

Or this -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flesch-Kincaid_readability_test#Flesch_Reading_Ease

The Flesch/Flesch–Kincaid readability tests are designed to indicate comprehension difficulty when reading a passage of contemporary academic English. There are two tests, the Flesch Reading Ease, and the Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level. Although they use the same core measures (word length and sentence length), they have different weighting factors, so the results of the two tests correlate approximately inversely: a text with a comparatively high score on the Reading Ease test should have a lower score on the Grade Level test.

In the Flesch Reading Ease test, higher scores indicate material that is easier to read; lower numbers mark passages that are more difficult to read. The formula for the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES) test is

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/math/4/e/0/4e00010b3dbb079fb3c8ab74482b9bef.png

Scores can be interpreted as shown in the table below.

Score Notes
90.0–100.0 easily understandable by an average 11-year-old student
60.0–70.0 easily understandable by 13- to 15-year-old students
0.0–30.0 best understood by university graduates


Reader's Digest magazine has a readability index of about 65, Time magazine scores about 52, an average 6th grade student's (an 11-year-old) written assignment has a readability test of 60–70 (and a reading grade level of 6–7), and the Harvard Law Review has a general readability score in the low 30s. The highest (easiest) readability score possible is around 120 (e.g. every sentence consisting of only two one-syllable words). The score does not have a theoretical lower bound. It is possible to make the score as low as you want by including words with arbitrarily many syllables. This sentence, for example, taken as a reading passage unto itself, has a readability score of about 18.5. This paragraph has a readability score of 19.1. The sentence, "The Australian platypus is seemingly a hybrid of a mammal and reptilian creature" is a 24.4. This article has a readability score of around 42.0.

Many government agencies require documents or forms to meet specific readability levels.

The U.S. Department of Defense uses the Reading Ease test as the standard test of readability for its documents and forms.[8] Florida requires that life insurance policies have a Flesch Reading Ease score of 45 or greater.

Use of this scale is so ubiquitous that it is bundled with popular word processing programs and services such as KWord, IBM Lotus Symphony, Microsoft Office Word, WordPerfect and WordPro.

Long words affect this score significantly more than they do the grade level score.

mds45
01-11-2011, 12:46
It is easy to dispose of anyone's ideas by assertion - such as declaring them to be drivel. I can say that Shakespeare was an idiot who wrote nonsense and that Einstein didn't know what he was talking about. It is easy, but not intelligent, to do that. For people can read them and decide for themselves. I would not class myself on the level of those geniuses in their fields, or even with my favorite Chesterton. But it is evident to me that there are levels of ordinary intelligence, below genius, and levels below that of ordinary intelligence. Unintelligence might even become ordinary. But it is the power to prove by argument and intelligent rhetoric - a lost art in our day - that demonstrates intelligence, not mere assertion.

I prefer a religion that holds intelligence in a place of respect and has a developed theology to a lack of one that dismisses what it disagrees with by mere assertion. The former is demonstrably more intelligent.

I didn't read any of this , not one word

rusmeister
01-11-2011, 13:51
I didn't read any of this , not one word
It IS difficult to talk to someone with their fingers in their ears shouting "I can't HEAR you!!!"

rusmeister
01-11-2011, 14:00
Or this -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flesch-Kincaid_readability_test#Flesch_Reading_Ease

The Flesch/Flesch–Kincaid readability tests are designed to indicate comprehension difficulty when reading a passage of contemporary academic English. There are two tests, the Flesch Reading Ease, and the Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level. Although they use the same core measures (word length and sentence length), they have different weighting factors, so the results of the two tests correlate approximately inversely: a text with a comparatively high score on the Reading Ease test should have a lower score on the Grade Level test.

In the Flesch Reading Ease test, higher scores indicate material that is easier to read; lower numbers mark passages that are more difficult to read. The formula for the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES) test is

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/math/4/e/0/4e00010b3dbb079fb3c8ab74482b9bef.png

Scores can be interpreted as shown in the table below.

Score Notes
90.0–100.0 easily understandable by an average 11-year-old student
60.0–70.0 easily understandable by 13- to 15-year-old students
0.0–30.0 best understood by university graduates


Reader's Digest magazine has a readability index of about 65, Time magazine scores about 52, an average 6th grade student's (an 11-year-old) written assignment has a readability test of 60–70 (and a reading grade level of 6–7), and the Harvard Law Review has a general readability score in the low 30s. The highest (easiest) readability score possible is around 120 (e.g. every sentence consisting of only two one-syllable words). The score does not have a theoretical lower bound. It is possible to make the score as low as you want by including words with arbitrarily many syllables. This sentence, for example, taken as a reading passage unto itself, has a readability score of about 18.5. This paragraph has a readability score of 19.1. The sentence, "The Australian platypus is seemingly a hybrid of a mammal and reptilian creature" is a 24.4. This article has a readability score of around 42.0.

Many government agencies require documents or forms to meet specific readability levels.

The U.S. Department of Defense uses the Reading Ease test as the standard test of readability for its documents and forms.[8] Florida requires that life insurance policies have a Flesch Reading Ease score of 45 or greater.

Use of this scale is so ubiquitous that it is bundled with popular word processing programs and services such as KWord, IBM Lotus Symphony, Microsoft Office Word, WordPerfect and WordPro.

Long words affect this score significantly more than they do the grade level score.

Honestly, Snoof, that looks a lot more like it would be used to justify a person's inability to read or think, all the more because it transfers the onus of "readability" to the text, rather than reading ability to the person.

If something is intelligently written, and speaks to an issue thoroughly, then intelligent people can recognize this. Reading is a skill, that must be mastered and practiced. It is increasingly NOT practiced in our day and age, with the people of our generation imagining themselves to be more intelligent than their ancestors - something that can be attributed to what Lewis called "the myth of evolutionism" (as opposed to evolutionary theory; the latter being a scientific theory about change, the former being a popular myth about inevitable improvement; I also call it the myth of Star Trek).

Making things easy ("reading ease") makes people stupid, just as making weight-lifting easier makes for inferior weight-lifters. It is the person who can take a text of length and intelligence, be it art, like "Evgeny Onegin" or "The Ballad of the White Horse" or a treatise or essay on philosophy, theology, the natural sciences, etc that can enjoy mental growth. People looking for ways to gauge how reading can be made "easier" for the general public are themselves on the way to becoming turnips.

mds45
01-11-2011, 15:45
It IS difficult to talk to someone with their fingers in their ears shouting "I can't HEAR you!!!"

You seem to assume that what you have to say is worth listening to )) priceless !

mikegulf
01-11-2011, 17:00
Where is the 89 to 71 and the 59 to 31 band width?
Or this -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flesch-Kincaid_readability_test#Flesch_Reading_Ease

The Flesch/Flesch–Kincaid readability tests are designed to indicate comprehension difficulty when reading a passage of contemporary academic English. There are two tests, the Flesch Reading Ease, and the Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level. Although they use the same core measures (word length and sentence length), they have different weighting factors, so the results of the two tests correlate approximately inversely: a text with a comparatively high score on the Reading Ease test should have a lower score on the Grade Level test.

In the Flesch Reading Ease test, higher scores indicate material that is easier to read; lower numbers mark passages that are more difficult to read. The formula for the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES) test is

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/math/4/e/0/4e00010b3dbb079fb3c8ab74482b9bef.png

Scores can be interpreted as shown in the table below.

Score Notes
90.0–100.0 easily understandable by an average 11-year-old student
60.0–70.0 easily understandable by 13- to 15-year-old students
0.0–30.0 best understood by university graduates


Reader's Digest magazine has a readability index of about 65, Time magazine scores about 52, an average 6th grade student's (an 11-year-old) written assignment has a readability test of 60–70 (and a reading grade level of 6–7), and the Harvard Law Review has a general readability score in the low 30s. The highest (easiest) readability score possible is around 120 (e.g. every sentence consisting of only two one-syllable words). The score does not have a theoretical lower bound. It is possible to make the score as low as you want by including words with arbitrarily many syllables. This sentence, for example, taken as a reading passage unto itself, has a readability score of about 18.5. This paragraph has a readability score of 19.1. The sentence, "The Australian platypus is seemingly a hybrid of a mammal and reptilian creature" is a 24.4. This article has a readability score of around 42.0.

Many government agencies require documents or forms to meet specific readability levels.

The U.S. Department of Defense uses the Reading Ease test as the standard test of readability for its documents and forms.[8] Florida requires that life insurance policies have a Flesch Reading Ease score of 45 or greater.

Use of this scale is so ubiquitous that it is bundled with popular word processing programs and services such as KWord, IBM Lotus Symphony, Microsoft Office Word, WordPerfect and WordPro.

Long words affect this score significantly more than they do the grade level score.

BrandonL
01-11-2011, 17:14
get back on topic boys and girls.

rusmeister
01-11-2011, 19:45
...

The trouble with assertions is that they really are only opinion. They reference nothing objective, and so prove nothing. A person with a good argument always trumps the assertionist. People of intelligence recognize the difference; those without do not.

rusmeister
01-11-2011, 19:46
get back on topic boys and girls.

Roger wilco.

rusmeister
02-11-2011, 09:27
Or they try to exert intellectual superiority by post long winded diatribes when a simple sentence or two will do.

Discussion taken to another thread:

http://expat.ru/forum/showthread.php?p=915834#post915834

Tyrone
02-11-2011, 09:39
Ha ha, you guys have way too much time on your hands! how does a simple invite to church turn into a scientific lecture on english?????
peace:10479: