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View Full Version : What you DO like about Russia?



Parco
24-10-2011, 15:37
To counter the negativity of the other post running, I'd like to kick-off a discussion about what we DO like about Russia. :mml:

:asskiss:

Yep, any negative thoughts can go on the other post ...here, we can write everything we love about the vast, wonderful and diverse place called Russia!

:SwoonLoveSmiley:

FatAndy
24-10-2011, 16:07
I love the Metro.
Specially 4 U:
http://burtalaws.narod.ru/metro_gazeta.jpg

Parco
24-10-2011, 16:17
I love the Metro.

+1

phbdc
24-10-2011, 16:28
Coming from America (land of crap public transport), I have to give public transport a giant thumbs up.

rusmeister
24-10-2011, 18:04
I love that I can be cruising on the Shelkovskoye Shosse and see billboards saying things like "Honor your father and mother!"
In the US the ACLU would have that down in a heartbeat due to its associations with a particular local religion, even though it is the common sense of all humanity.

I love that, even if we screw up, Russian bureaucrats can (sometimes) have mercy on us, whereas in the US they are much more inflexible on rules. It's happened to me more than once, where I know that the US bureaucrat would simply have sunk me.

I love, despite the particular forms of local insanity, the enormous common sense that rejects western political correctness, which is simply the practical application of pluralism.

I love that most Russian grandparents think involvement in their grandchildren's lives a major part of their own lives.

I love that, between small towns with short walking distances and public
transport, I can have a couple of beers without worrying about how I'm going to get home.

I love that English teachers (real ones, at any rate) get respect here that they do not get at home; that English is seen, not as something to be taught to immigrants and refugees (ie, people with "deficiencies"), but to intelligent people.

BabyFirefly
24-10-2011, 20:58
The metro and public transport in general
The parks
The fact that men are more chivalrous, and women more feminine
The culture
I love having russian in-laws. They're incredible.
How loyal and selfless Russian friends are.
And I agree also that bureaucrats here are most of the time (at least in my case) actually much more flexible than their US counterparts.
The changing seasons (where I come from it's "rain" and "no rain").
That Russians tend to be a bit more... hmm "practical". The men I know here tend to know how to fix things around the house, and the women know how to cook and so on. Can't say the same about most Americans.
That there's always something to do in Moscow.
The education I'm receiving at MGU is excellent, and better than the one I received at home.
Russian food!
There's much more!

robertmf
24-10-2011, 21:39
To counter the negativity of the other post running, I'd like to kick-off a discussion about what we DO like about Russia. :mml:

:SwoonLoveSmiley:


Baikal/Irkutsk :applause:
Moscow metro
Mamayev Kurgan :12115:
cheap & plentiful vodka
;) wild wacky weed
Kazimir Malevich
Kharbarovsk wood sidewalks
19th c. Russian lit.

tvadim133
24-10-2011, 22:00
To counter the negativity of the other post running, I'd like to kick-off a discussion about what we DO like about Russia. :mml:

:asskiss:

Yep, any negative thoughts can go on the other post ...here, we can write everything we love about the vast, wonderful and diverse place called Russia!

:SwoonLoveSmiley:
That's great, you started this post!

What I personally and always think is that each moment (country, life, environment, job, love e.t.c.) it is worth thinking of positive things or life will has revenge immidiately!

Russia is a comrehensive place to live in, and has a lot of drawbacks, but sure it is not boring here and some people really can stand the absence of toilet paper in Pushkinsky museum (I doubt that it is absent there indeed), but first of all, but get pleasure out of collections of paintinings, which are better (to my opinion) then in some more-than-famous galleries; they can stand and can cope with living in a small flats, but they have got real friends, which would "put off his last trousers" and sell them in oder to help you; and so on

they "can stand with , but " may be is Russia itself showing it's real nature and spirit, which I like most of all and which is the most important for me in people.

rusmeister
25-10-2011, 07:53
Vadim here has reminded me of the Tretyakov Gallery; the best in the world (in my experience, anyway, which does include the Louvre and the Hermitage).

On chivalry and femininity, it is precisely that western children have an ideology shouted at them in school and the media that there is no difference between men and women, that they are interchangeable - thus the confusion and rapid proliferation of same-sex attraction, thus the complete abandonment of chivalry, a medieval Christian ideal that is far superior to the feminism which, in abandoning God, has made equality to mean "identicality" and set that up as the god to worship, which is sacrilege to blaspheme. Chivalry cried out "Vive la difference!" and we saw its last gasp in the West in the sinking of the Titanic. The feminist pluralism peddled today cries out "Tuer la difference!" and seeks to create a unisex that makes no distinctions and shows no more than an animal understanding of sex and the sexes, the mere gratification of one's personal lusts - thus, the objectification of both men and women as sex objects to be used and discarded (or divorced) rather than fellow humans to be respected and loved. Rather the opposite of the historical view that they sell.

Anyway, I love that in Russia, men are OK with being men and women with being women, and that Maria Arbatova is really not popular despite her best efforts to turn Russian women into duped western women.

rusmeister
25-10-2011, 08:04
The metro and public transport in general
The parks
The fact that men are more chivalrous, and women more feminine
The culture
I love having russian in-laws. They're incredible.
How loyal and selfless Russian friends are.
And I agree also that bureaucrats here are most of the time (at least in my case) actually much more flexible than their US counterparts.
The changing seasons (where I come from it's "rain" and "no rain").
That Russians tend to be a bit more... hmm "practical". The men I know here tend to know how to fix things around the house, and the women know how to cook and so on. Can't say the same about most Americans.
That there's always something to do in Moscow.
The education I'm receiving at MGU is excellent, and better than the one I received at home.
Russian food!
There's much more!

My son's in MGU.

I think that some of these things can be found elsewhere. It is the things that are either peculiar to Russia or at least different than the western anglo-american world that deserve special note. I can find changing seasons in upstate NY, and a little better balanced than here, where winter really IS 4 and a half months.

But the ability of men and women to do things in the home is, I think, a valid, if not universal observation - a tendency, at the least. I think that due to our "developed" culture - the aim of the education and business is the specialization of labor - so that a person, in general, can do only one narrow thing; and since the "emancipation" of women, that what had been done to men was also henceforth done to women as well. Thus, the man can only stare at the leaking pipe or electrical fixture, and the woman to throw things out that, in our recent ancestral past, would have been repaired, and/or thrift applied as a virtue to find another use for a thing - something that our consumer culture, something antithetical to people like Abraham Lincoln and Laura Ingalls, has stamped out to a great extent.

I remember how pleasantly surprised I was to find the existence of "remont obuvi" and "metalloremont" - things practically non-existent in American culture - here in Russia. It is symptomatic of thrift and a refusal to waste, whereas our western masters of the global economy offer us a "Wall-E" future of continuous waste. So chalk up another thing I love about Russia! :)

BabyFirefly
25-10-2011, 15:50
Of course I speak given the experiences I've had living in other countries (Australia, the US and Hong Kong). I'm sure many of these things I can find abroad, but they've made my time in Russia much more special for me, since they're new to me.

xSnoofovich
25-10-2011, 16:29
It is the things that are either peculiar to Russia or at least different than the western anglo-american world that deserve special note. I can find changing seasons in upstate NY,

Ah yes, but what if you aren't Americentric? ;b

Anywho, I love the selection of bottled water. An entire aisle !

I love the fact that if I am driving, and a traffic cop pulls me over, I can talk to him, and not worry about having a gun being pulled on me. In fact, I can get out of the car and walk over and talk to him.

I like the ability to order food off the internet. (utkanos)
I like being able to see the country of origin on the food I am buying.


+ many more things

NLD
25-10-2011, 19:15
I'm seeing a lot of things here that would also apply to my home country (the Netherlands), so from the perspective of a Dutchy:
- There really is so much more to do, most of our weekends are pretty full;
- Family and friends are a lot closer;
- The subway is pretty nice indeed, although it can't quite beat a bike around the center :)
- Proper winter with lots of snow and ice :)
- Being able to have and Dutch culture/traditions/cuisine and Russian too!

Benedikt
25-10-2011, 20:28
that excludes my family,including my mother in law, because them I LOVE.

here in Moscow i like
the cheap and EFFICENT public transport, even if the trams are sometimes freezing in winter and boiling in summer.

even if it is not for me, the 2system -2 days working-2 days off- never any rush to get anything, because somewhere someone around the corner something is open around the clock,might that be a supermarket, hairdresser, vet or funeral parlor *(no need for it yet but good to know)

shopping also on saturday and sunday (Austria is a good catholic country and sunday you go to church and after that maybe for a beer to the local gasthaus, but that's it)

the many museums,where i can spend the whole day on a cold,wet wintersday.

our huge park across the road where we can walk our dogs and no one bothers us.

cheap internet (for waht we pay here we would pay 5 times more in Austria with half the options)

people are not so narrow minded here. this is one reason why i never will go back to Austria.

robertmf
25-10-2011, 21:06
I'm seeing a lot of things here that would also apply to my home country (the Netherlands), so from the perspective of a Dutchy:

- Being able to have and Dutch culture/traditions/cuisine and Russian too!

:clown: You also don't have to keep your finger in the dyke !-:wavey:

rusmeister
25-10-2011, 21:09
Ah yes, but what if you aren't Americentric? ;b

Hey, dude, I am 100% American mutt, made in the USA, обрусевщий (and proud of that, too, and loving my adopted country as I do my native land), but will remain, as you say, "Americentric". :)

rusmeister
25-10-2011, 21:12
people are not so narrow minded here. this is one reason why i never will go back to Austria.

I no longer know what "narrow-minded" means. I used to think I know; now I realize that I don't know. Or rather, that people generally don't know exactly what it means. It's a rhetorical term, designed to kill rather than stimulate thought - to make people think they already know and therefore have no need to think. (Not that you intend that; only that we were all brought up with that general unconscious attitude towards rhetorical terms.)

ZippyCrx
27-10-2011, 12:57
That I can get away with almost anything by saying that I don't speak Russian.

SV1973a
27-10-2011, 13:02
That I can get away with almost anything by saying that I don't speak Russian.

And with all the rest you can get away by trying to speak Russian.

Parco
27-10-2011, 13:44
Is it possible to say 'I like everything'? As I haven't encountered anything I don't like. Russia is such a brilliant country in so many ways. Yes there are a lot of bad things but not one country is perfect. If everywhere was like say, Switzerland (sorry Swiss people) where everything is safe, works as it should ...life would be pretty boring.

rusmeister
27-10-2011, 16:15
Is it possible to say 'I like everything'? As I haven't encountered anything I don't like. Russia is such a brilliant country in so many ways. Yes there are a lot of bad things but not one country is perfect. If everywhere was like say, Switzerland (sorry Swiss people) where everything is safe, works as it should ...life would be pretty boring.

Can you like being arrested for no reason, strip-searched and shook down for your money by the cops? There is good and bad here, and excessive optimism is probably as bad as excessive pessimism. The problem is in the excess.

A general attitude of wonder and gratitude is good for us, though, and we generally do not know what good we have till we have lost it.