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4charles
10-10-2011, 21:24
Hello
I recently graduated with my BS in economics then moved to Moscow. Couldn't find any related employment, but my russian wife did. I came back to the US to get another 3 month visa; but now I'm taking the Oxford ESL classes. So when I return I can hopefully have a job teaching english and also I hear that most of the russian schools will help pay for the flight and/or visa. So does any one know which schools are the "best" to work/teach for? I was talking to a recruiter form BKC and they didn't seem like they were interested.

Thanks

Bels
10-10-2011, 23:19
What is Oxford classes? I am only aware of TEFL qualifications equivalent to for example CELTA or Trinity. There are possibly a few other TESOL qualifications accepted from the USA. I am not aware of Oxford as a TEFL qualification, and that might be your problem.

Not most of the EFL schools in Russia will provide you the full package of covering your costs of flight and visa, plus give you a shared flat to accommodate you.Not all will give you a telephone interview and then give you a contract to come to Russia as an employee EFL teacher.

There are only two companies that I am aware of who will provide you this service, and that is BKC and LanguageLink. The others will simply try to use you as already having the correct employment visas. And times have changed, as you must now have the correct TEFL qualification to teach in Russia, and that is why BKC and probably Language Link will say the same. The fact is that they can't give you the right to work in Russia without the correct qualifications.

What I did in your situation seven years ago? Married to a Russian wife. I advertised for stdents in my local area, I found a classroom. I taght one tone and small groups, mainly beginner children from the age of four, plus teenagers. Plus a few adults. I applied residency, with the help of my Russian wife, We both also applied for an entrepreneur tax licence. Now we were officially private teachers in Russia, with my wife now mainl handling the administration of my business. YES! It's tough! Even tougher for you than it was for me, as regulations in Russia constantly tightens. But I say go for it, if that is what you want.

Go for private, as won't need the schools, and they can't afford to give you the family income you require School employment can only afford those single teenagers who want to travel and have a free holiday, with probably the backup of their parents to financially bail them out when they have problems.

To summarise. Establish your local market and get your students paying you cash. Apply for residency. Find a classroom or visit your students in your loca community. DO NOT TRAVEL FAR! As you will give up pretty soon, and believe me you will be pursuaded to do so. Ignore fantastic offers from schools, and stick to individual demand.
Establish yourself in your area, and very soon you will never have to advertise, and you be contantlly telling enquiries in October that you are fully booked. Like I am, as I can take no more untill the Summer m,onths.



Hello
I recently graduated with my BS in economics then moved to Moscow. Couldn't find any related employment, but my russian wife did. I came back to the US to get another 3 month visa; but now I'm taking the Oxford ESL classes. So when I return I can hopefully have a job teaching english and also I hear that most of the russian schools will help pay for the flight and/or visa. So does any one know which schools are the "best" to work/teach for? I was talking to a recruiter form BKC and they didn't seem like they were interested.

Thanks

Victoria 55
17-10-2011, 19:35
Hello
I recently graduated with my BS in economics then moved to Moscow. Couldn't find any related employment, but my russian wife did. I came back to the US to get another 3 month visa; but now I'm taking the Oxford ESL classes. So when I return I can hopefully have a job teaching english and also I hear that most of the russian schools will help pay for the flight and/or visa. So does any one know which schools are the "best" to work/teach for? I was talking to a recruiter form BKC and they didn't seem like they were interested.

Thanks
I would advise Wall Street Institute. The Institute has several schools and I think you can choose the most appropriate one.

Rexy
19-10-2011, 15:52
As far as I know BKC school prefers their teachers to have the CELTA Certificate. Try to apply there one more time. They never express enthusiasm while hiring someone. Anyway there are lots of other language schools here and English teachers are always needed.
Excuse me for the question but isn't it easier to move with your wife to the US? It is a known fact that women settle down in other countries better than men do.

robertmf
19-10-2011, 16:05
... It is a known fact that women settle down in other countries better than men do.

:10600: :verycool: Who says this ? И ну где ты узнала :question: ...

Sarra
19-10-2011, 17:18
I don't know for Language Link but BKC is a BAD idea. It's a big school and so administration rarely works as it should. I was working there but then left. They really treat people like trash. I was interested only because they provide you with visa. My english is not very good so I'm afraid I can't explain you all very well. But there are two types of contract : you have the full contract with visa, flat and stuff (in that case, your pay isn't very high ), and you have the hourly paid contract without flat or help but you're paid per hour and it's better if you can have enough groups.
The problem is that they won't give you as many groups as they do with full contract teachers.
Anyway, I saw what it's really like and I sincerely recommend you not to try with BKC.
There are plenty of other schools in Moscow. Of course not all of them will help you with flat and visa but you can always try to find some. Maybe you should follow Bels's advice. It's always very hard in beggining but if you find a school and start working, it'll be much easier after.
If you have a russian wife, just use it to have an authorization to live in Russia and the less you need school's help, the best you'll feel. Just believe me.
Good luck ! )

Rexy
19-10-2011, 22:34
:10600: :verycool: Who says this ? И ну где ты узнала :question: ...

Firstly, for women it is not so depressing not to have a job for a while. The society doesn't demand us being a "breadwinner".
Secondly, we are just more flexible, you know =) It is not a problem for women to find new friends very soon. Have you noticed that men's friends are mostly from their childhood, while the circle of women's friends changes when she moves from school to university or when she changes a job. I don't consider exceptions. Just the general tendency.
Then, taking into consideration these exact two countries (the RF and the US), it won't be unfair to say that it is easier for a young woman graduated from the US college (or Institute?) to find a job there than for an american non-russian speaker having a BS in economics to find one here.

smchilds
21-10-2011, 20:16
It is true I think that it's easier for women to relocate than men. I brought my husband to the USA and he had a hard time, not being able to work and struggling with the language. But in the USA it is hard to find a decent job, even with proper documents, and impossible on a visitor's visa/while waiting for the green card.

BUT: since the OP wants to teach English in Moscow, if he has a decent personality and can manage a lesson, he should have no problem finding students and making a decent living, even without the proper documents and living in Moscow on a business visa. There are plenty of jobs for English-speakers in Moscow whereas there aren't tons of jobs readily available for foreigners in the US.

Bels
22-10-2011, 00:49
What are these Oxford ESL classes? YRS! to be accepted ny MKC or Languagelink your qualifications will need teed to be internationally recognised. It needs to be a Tesol, or what others like to push the Hoover, it needs to be equivelent to CELTA. As that is what they are selling! LOL!

But if you are settled with your wife in Russia? All you need to worry about is getting your residency, and get yourself a classroom. And if you are a good teacher students will come to you , begging you to teach them. Forget about the schools, and stay to your classroom. And don't run around all over Moscow, and stay in your local area. That is my advice.


Hello
I recently graduated with my BS in economics then moved to Moscow. Couldn't find any related employment, but my russian wife did. I came back to the US to get another 3 month visa; but now I'm taking the Oxford ESL classes. So when I return I can hopefully have a job teaching english and also I hear that most of the russian schools will help pay for the flight and/or visa. So does any one know which schools are the "best" to work/teach for? I was talking to a recruiter form BKC and they didn't seem like they were interested.

Thanks

4charles
22-10-2011, 01:52
Firstly, for women it is not so depressing not to have a job for a while. The society doesn't demand us being a "breadwinner".
Secondly, we are just more flexible, you know =) It is not a problem for women to find new friends very soon. Have you noticed that men's friends are mostly from their childhood, while the circle of women's friends changes when she moves from school to university or when she changes a job. I don't consider exceptions. Just the general tendency.
Then, taking into consideration these exact two countries (the RF and the US), it won't be unfair to say that it is easier for a young woman graduated from the US college (or Institute?) to find a job there than for an american non-russian speaker having a BS in economics to find one here.

Yeah you are correct and that is exactly what we wanted to do; however, she had a J-1 visa with a 2 year residency requirement so...

4charles
22-10-2011, 02:04
What are these Oxford ESL classes? YRS! to be accepted ny MKC or Languagelink your qualifications will need teed to be internationally recognised. It needs to be a Tesol, or what others like to push the Hoover, it needs to be equivelent to CELTA. As that is what they are selling! LOL!

But if you are settled with your wife in Russia? All you need to worry about is getting your residency, and get yourself a classroom. And if you are a good teacher students will come to you , begging you to teach them. Forget about the schools, and stay to your classroom. And don't run around all over Moscow, and stay in your local area. That is my advice.

Thanks for the info, the "Oxford Seminars" offer certification in TESOL/TEFL/TESL it is a 100 hour course and yes it is supposedly "equivalent" to the CELTA. I will be returning to Moscow in December with this certification, so I would like to have some possibilities/interviews lined up. I have not been able to get a response from any of the language schools in Moscow (so far) but I will remain optimistic and keep pursuing.

I don't want to get residency it seems to not be worth the trouble. If we are only planing on staying in Moscow for a couple years or so I can just do visa runs.

xSnoofovich
27-10-2011, 11:39
There are plenty of jobs for English-speakers in Moscow whereas there aren't tons of jobs readily available for foreigners in the US.

Sure there are.

They just aren't white collar.