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Molihua
06-10-2011, 12:46
Here http://www.languagetime.ru/russian_test_engl/ you can test your level of Russian!

AstarD
06-10-2011, 13:07
It's a great test. I wish the text were bigger and in a different font that is easier to read.

FatAndy
06-10-2011, 17:31
I'm advanced, 99%!:12115:

Tony P
06-10-2011, 22:02
I'm advanced, 99%!:12115:
Mazel tov.

When 'her indoors' was going through the UK citizenship process, several times I tried interactive 'Life in Britain' practice tests.
To my great embarressment, and her delight, I failed several times.

Good to report though that when going for her actual test she did not!


Later, the Swearing ceremony was a real eyeopener. 60 candidates - only one white face among them, hers. Some couldn't even repeat the Oath in English sufficiently comprehensible for the Clerk to accept - and he was trying very, very hard!
Little wonder I no longer recognise or like the country of my youth and forefathers!

NLD
06-10-2011, 22:38
Advanced too, though only 91%. Still, not bad, not bad at all :)

FatAndy
07-10-2011, 12:16
It is quite excellent for a non-native speaker! :thumbsup: But, as far as I understand, it is a bit pre-defined by your birthplace - AFAIK you start to learn different languages quite early in Netherlands;)

Advanced too, though only 91%. Still, not bad, not bad at all :)

FatAndy
07-10-2011, 12:22
Shalom, toda raba,
It is globalisation, and nobody can say definitely that it's 100% bad or 100% good.


Mazel tov.

When 'her indoors' was going through the UK citizenship process, several times I tried interactive 'Life in Britain' practice tests.
To my great embarressment, and her delight, I failed several times.

Good to report though that when going for her actual test she did not!


Later, the Swearing ceremony was a real eyeopener. 60 candidates - only one white face among them, hers. Some couldn't even repeat the Oath in English sufficiently comprehensible for the Clerk to accept - and he was trying very, very hard!
Little wonder I no longer recognise or like the country of my youth and forefathers!

Korotky Gennady
07-10-2011, 18:42
Can anybody give on-line english test better... ? I wanna check myself out...

I have enslish exam in this month or sometime around...

AstarD
07-10-2011, 18:46
http://www.scientificpsychic.com/cgi-bin/engtst1.pl

Korotky Gennady
07-10-2011, 21:09
http://www.scientificpsychic.com/cgi-bin/engtst1.pl

My English Test Results

Your 15 responses had 11 correct answers.
Your responses were 73.33% correct.
Your final score is 73.33.
Below is the test with the correct answers highlighted.

:trampoline:

My english is 73.33 % percents !

robertmf
07-10-2011, 21:21
My English Test Results

:trampoline:

My english is 73.33 % percent[-]s[/-] !


:emote_popcorn: "percent" is not pluralized with an 's'.

Take off an additional 1/3 of 1% (.33%) :11158:

Korotky Gennady
07-10-2011, 21:28
[COLOR="DarkRed"]:emote_popcorn: "percent" is not pluralized with an 's'.:
:duhhhh:

:))))

There one more english test there... http://www.scientificpsychic.com/cgi-bin/engtst1.pl

I'll try it too.

Tony P
08-10-2011, 01:09
There one more english test there... I'll try it too.

" There is (or there's) one more English test here..."
The rest was OK! ;)

NLD
08-10-2011, 11:03
http://www.scientificpsychic.com/cgi-bin/engtst1.pl

Too bad such tests often contain mistakes... They claim e.g. that 'The word "SINCERE" 1. Is derived from the Latin expression meaning "without wax".' Wiktionary claims otherwise: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sincere

Korotky Gennady
08-10-2011, 13:51
"

The rest was OK! ;)

Good for me. Though the rest isn't too big...

Korotky Gennady
08-10-2011, 13:55
Too bad such tests often contain mistakes... They claim e.g. that 'The word "SINCERE" 1. Is derived from the Latin expression meaning "without wax".'

Wiktionary claims otherwise: [url]
]

When I was making this test I didn't consult Wikipedia... Nevertheless the test seems to me very complicated thing.

For sure it will be hard even for native speakers to make it well...

robertmf
08-10-2011, 14:52
Too bad such tests often contain mistakes... They claim e.g. that 'The word "SINCERE" 1. Is derived from the Latin expression meaning "without wax".' Wiktionary claims otherwise: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sincere

Etymology

The Oxford English Dictionary and most scholars state that sincerity from sincere is derived from the Latin sincerus meaning clean, pure, sound (1525–35). Sincerus may have once meant "one growth" (not mixed), from sin- (one) and crescere (to grow).[3] Crescere is cognate with "Ceres," the goddess of grain, as in "cereal."[4][5]

According to the American Heritage Dictionary,[6] the Latin word sincerus is derived from the Indo-European root *sm̥kēros, itself derived from the zero-grade of *sem (one) and the suffixed, lengthened e-grade of *ker (grow), generating the underlying meaning of one growth, hence pure, clean.

Controversy
An often repeated folk etymology proposes that sincere is derived from the Latin sine = without, cera = wax. According to one popular explanation, dishonest sculptors in Rome or Greece would cover flaws in their work with wax to deceive the viewer; therefore, a sculpture "without wax" would mean honesty in its perfection.[4] Another explanation is that this etymology "is derived from a Greeks-bearing-gifts story of deceit and betrayal. For the feat of victory, the Romans demanded the handing over of obligatory tributes. Following bad advice, the Greeks resorted to some faux-marble statues made of wax, which they offered as tribute. These promptly melted in the warm Greek sun."[7] The Oxford English Dictionary states, however, that "there is no probability in the old explanation from sine cera 'without wax'". Also note the entry on sincere in An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (p. 555) and Storied Words: The Writer's Vocabulary and Its Origins by Jeff Jeske (p. 145). The popularity of the without wax etymology is reflected in its use as a minor subplot in Dan Brown's Digital Fortress, though Brown attributes it to the Spanish language, not Latin. Reference to the same etymology, this time attributed to Latin, also appears in another of his books, The Lost Symbol.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sincerity#Controversy

Question: Sincere - Possible origins of the word 'sincere' or 'sincerely'
The origin of the word sincere is disputed, although the popular etymology has it coming from words for 'without wax.'

Answer: It is commonly believed that sincere comes from two Latin words - sine 'without' and cera 'wax'. Although even that much is challenged, there are two explanations for how 'without wax' came to be an important claim, both involving craftsmen, who during the Republic of Rome, would generally have been slaves or foreigners. Some think that marble workers would cover imperfections in the stone with wax, much as modern homemakers or unscrupulous antique dealers might rub wax to hide a scratch in wood. Another idea for the origin of sincere has more ominous consequences. Since cement was more expensive than wax, unscrupulous brick layers would sometimes employ it -- at least that's the story. When it melted, bricks could shift and structures collapse. So the claim that something was sine cera would be an important guarantee.
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/etymology/f/Sincere.htm