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Bels
25-08-2007, 21:57
May I be the one to re-start this valuable folder?

Does anyone want to discuss anything about teaching, employment as a teacher? Self employment as a teacher? Or long term teaching in Russia as a profession? etc?

That's just a few suggestions above, perhaps we can start by introducing each other for starters. My names John (BELS) by the way. I work in the Moscow western region with my as partners as private teachers. I have never worked for a school in Russia.

maribel
27-08-2007, 21:01
Hello everybody!

I am Russian, a moscovite and teach English as a foreign language. Officially I work for IPT school - a very good company with excellent conditions for the natives (pm me if you need the contacts). But the majority of my students are private ones, at the moment I have two students and four groups. I am very pleased with my job now due to the money paid and the schedule. Don't really know what to discuss here but will answer any questions risen.

Surok
27-08-2007, 21:20
What happened to the website that was set up for Moscow teachers?

maribel
27-08-2007, 23:37
What happened to the website that was set up for Moscow teachers?


Whatr's wrong with this one?

Bels
28-08-2007, 13:39
What happened to the website that was set up for Moscow teachers?

Are you talking about moscowteachers.com ? It appears to have died like a lot of new sites. I believe the problem is that a lot of of teachers in Moscow leave the city after a few years or even a few months. Employed foreign teachers contracts are normally about six months to a year.

Best to stick here with an established forum and a mixture of expats.

If you are seeking a good established forum and website specialising in EFL try eslcafe.com. It has even got a forum covering Russia and CIS. Alot about Moscow is mentioned.

Another one especially for international EFL jobs including Russia and the UK being the biggest is TEFL.COM

However I go for this one for more experienced expats and you are more likely to find the private self employed teachers here.

Bels
28-08-2007, 13:52
Hello everybody!

I am Russian, a moscovite and teach English as a foreign language. Officially I work for IPT school - a very good company with excellent conditions for the natives (pm me if you need the contacts). But the majority of my students are private ones, at the moment I have two students and four groups. I am very pleased with my job now due to the money paid and the schedule. Don't really know what to discuss here but will answer any questions risen.

Hello Maribel

When you say private ones, do you mean that your own private individuals and four groups are your own and independant from the school. If that is the case I must say its the best way.

However in regards to employment with a school it would take a lot in comparison of the rates I have seen schools advertise. I haven't seen a school yet that has a salary for one to keep a family.

Surok
28-08-2007, 13:56
Whatr's wrong with this one?

Just wondered :) And Bels kindly supplied the answer.

maribel
28-08-2007, 22:33
Hello Maribel

When you say private ones, do you mean that your own private individuals and four groups are your own and independant from the school.

Yes, exactly.


If that is the case I must say its the best way.
However in regards to employment with a school it would take a lot in comparison of the rates I have seen schools advertise. I haven't seen a school yet that has a salary for one to keep a family.

Yes, you are right here. Still I should also be emplyed by a school to take some official papers from them for the banks, embassies to get a visa, so on and so forth. To be honest, I have only one group at my school at the moment, but they are starting to look askew at me as I have quite a high pay rate even comparing to the natives and don't take new students from them.

Bels
28-08-2007, 22:56
Very true Maribel, But you state your country of origin as Moscow, that shouldn't be a problem for you. Yes it's true a foreigner needs a school that is able to provide an invitation from themselves and get just a few hours from them. Not many schools can officially do this. The best path for an Expat to go totally private is to get temporary residency first and then an entrepeurs registration to register as self employed and pay Russian taxes.

True, there is no need to pinch students. Sounds like they don't have enough anyway.

Pyotr
30-08-2007, 11:30
The best path for an Expat to go totally private is to get temporary residency first and then an entrepeurs registration to register as self employed and pay Russian taxes.


Interesting. Do you have any advice about getting temporary residency? How difficult? How long to process?

If you could point to a site or offer some tips, it would be much appreciated.

Bels
30-08-2007, 13:01
For temporary residency try the information and the passport section in GENERAL at the top. Above where you clicked lessons to get here. There are a few popular posts there. No posts about entrepeneur yet.

For entrepenuer go to the local tax office, I went to Odentsova, but if you are mainstream Moscow it will be somewhere else. Best to use an accountant at first for assistance with the correct and they will probably have a courier service to avoid the long queus. You can't apply until you get your temporary residency.

Bels
30-08-2007, 13:04
I forgot to mention, while you are here first of all click Moscow Expat forums at the top left hand corner.

koshka
02-09-2007, 16:04
I've got a couple months left on my contract, and I'm counting the days. Language Link is not the worst school (so I hear), but some of the schedules they've put me on have absolutely infuriated me.
For example in June, I taught early mornings (8:30 start) then a break just long enough to run home and eat something, then cross the city for a lesson or two in the afternoon, then whack off for a couple hours until evening lessons (not enough time to go home). Get home just before 11pm, go to sleep, do it all over again. :verymad:
I plan to stay in Moscow next year, and I actually like teaching, but I'd rather puke nails than sign another contract. :vomit:

Is anyone willing to say what you charge for private students? It's helpful to know the general going rate.

Bels
02-09-2007, 17:03
I'm now charging £30 (1500p) an academic hour for one to one. However I need pursuasion to do it as I prefer groups. They must come to me. Too much hassle travelling and they are often unreliable when you go this way.

kazachka
02-09-2007, 17:23
Yes, moscowteachers.com seems to have died some time ago. It seems that things have got rather quiet in here as well. I'm about to begin my 12th year teaching (my how the years fly). I currently work as a governess for Bonne during the second half of the day. I fit in a few private students on my way to work 2-4 days a week at my own will.
Prior to that, I taught Russian and ESL (and Spanish too though I don't like to advertise that I have this qualification too) in Alaska for nine years. Most of that was at the high school and uni levels but I also had many a k-6 group after school that in turn fed into my high school program. I've lived in Russia off and on since 1990 and finally came here permanently in 2005.

Let's see...hmmm...what else... OK, those of you who know me know that I spend the rest of my time training as I'm also a semi professional runner. So, you may have seen me hanging out in the sports folder.This is my 10th season competing in Moscow and I'm coached by my significant other who in his heyday was the 10,000m USSR champion who now coaches the top distance dogs on the Team. Gee- perhaps I should offer conversational English during an easy run in the park:o:jester:

Bels
02-09-2007, 17:41
I think August is one of the quietest months, no work for teachers and many of the expats I wouldn't be surprised have been away abroad on their holidays. They may well be on their way back now and it be busier here soon. However I know that starting tomorrow I will be extremely busy. In fact busier than I have ever been. I won't have so much time on the computer.

Bonne International appears to be the only emplyer that seems to advertise offering a sensible income. Perhaps it's because it's an agency and claims just a commission.

kazachka
02-09-2007, 17:56
The family I work for have been in Nice since 20 July. I took a badly needed 6 week break which ends tomorrow afternoon. My private students are beginning to call wanting lessons now too. Oh, I sense the Busy Monster returning.
Originally Coach and I were going to train in Kislovodsk in Aug. but decided not to due to the 40 degree heat that never broke:( So, we were at the dacha most of the time since it was too hot to stay here. I'm very lucky (throw salt over shoulder) that I get paid when my client is out of town. That's part of the contract.

Bels
02-09-2007, 17:56
I've got a couple months left on my contract, and I'm counting the days. Language Link is not the worst school (so I hear), but some of the schedules they've put me on have absolutely infuriated me.
For example in June, I taught early mornings (8:30 start) then a break just long enough to run home and eat something, then cross the city for a lesson or two in the afternoon, then whack off for a couple hours until evening lessons (not enough time to go home). Get home just before 11pm, go to sleep, do it all over again. :verymad:
I plan to stay in Moscow next year, and I actually like teaching, but I'd rather puke nails than sign another contract. :vomit:

Is anyone willing to say what you charge for private students? It's helpful to know the general going rate.


BKC and Language Link are considered the only two safe schools for employment for those who are seeking employment in Russia for the first time.

You probably got interveiwed for the job in your own country, they do have the right to give invitations with your visa, they give you the full package to settle in Moscow, and last but not least they have a reputation of actually paying you on time or at all.

Looks like you want to stay in Moscow and you are now more experienced. So you can now start shopping around.

Bels
02-09-2007, 18:05
The family I work for have been in Nice since 20 July. I took a badly needed 6 week break which ends tomorrow afternoon. My private students are beginning to call wanting lessons now too. Oh, I sense the Busy Monster returning.
Originally Coach and I were going to train in Kislovodsk in Aug. but decided not to due to the 40 degree heat that never broke:( So, we were at the dacha most of the time since it was too hot to stay here. I'm very lucky (throw salt over shoulder) that I get paid when my client is out of town. That's part of the contract.

Looks like we are all in the same boat. Tomorrow is the beginning of a busy year for good teachers.

Yes as private teachers it's important you charge monthly in advance and if they cancel that should be their problem. After all you still need an income and you have probably had to prepare some time for them.

kazachka
02-09-2007, 19:53
Looks like we are all in the same boat. Tomorrow is the beginning of a busy year for good teachers.

Yes as private teachers it's important you charge monthly in advance and if they cancel that should be their problem. After all you still need an income and you have probably had to prepare some time for them.

I couldn't agree more. I did some research a few yrs back, and some schools don't pay or pay half if class is cancelled within x amount of hours prior to the lesson. I always found this to be quite ridiculous. For example, last summer, I had to take recency credits to renew my teaching license. OK, I paid the tuition to MGU up front for x amount of hours of class. Now, regardless of whether I attended class every day, I still paid the same tuition and my instructors got paid. If I wanted to be lazy and cut cl**** that was my problem, not the teacher's and not the school's, and that's the way it should be. It's my loss not theirs. My teachers still spent time preparing for the lesson whether I chose to show up or not. Having been a high school teacher under contract WITH PAID PREP TIME, I could get into a nice discussion about teachers' rights. Good teachers spend a lot of time outside the classroom preparing too. No paid prep time and there would have been a strike, plain and simple!!!

Bels
02-09-2007, 20:28
I think you are mainly talking about state schools, sounds like the UK and of course standards are much higher there, and so are the wages and conditions due to a strong union.

However EFL teachers in Russia shouldn't expect less, or just simply refuse to work for them.

In regards to payment to teachers for school class cancellation. that's disgusting and I'm sure the students are charged up front and if they miss a lesson it's their problem. Therefore there is no excuse for the teacher not to be paid. and of course the teacher should be paid for lesson preparation not simply time spent in the classroom.

Bels
02-09-2007, 20:30
I'm sorry :) You are American. Still things must be simular there.

kazachka
02-09-2007, 20:39
Yes, I taught at a public high school and we definitely had a strong union. I'm not sure how wages compare to the UK, but I taught in Alaska, where my salary was already 35-40% higher than I'd have earned in the Continental US with the same education and experience. Cost of living in Alaska is higher though. However, last week eggs at Perekrestok were 50rub/10. That's what they cost in Anchorage-2$/12eggs:yikes: I'm not happy that Moscow is catching up. :mad: I recently increased my rates as well. Cost of living here is rising, I continue to do professional development and take courses to stay current, plus with each year of solid experience, a pay rise is appropriate for quality work done. That's how I justify it.

Bels
02-09-2007, 20:53
Is there still a shortage of women in Alaska. I saw a programme about Alaskan men looking for wives in the USA, to take back with them. Ohwhats her name's programme.

Bels
02-09-2007, 20:55
Also you can risk increasing your rates once you have maximum enquiries and become almost fully booked.

kazachka
02-09-2007, 21:26
LOL!!! Yes, men still outnumber women there but we Alaskan women have a saying, "The odds are good but the goods are too ODD," !!!!! This would explain why I didn't date much in my early/mid 20s.

koshka
03-09-2007, 16:52
With 2 years of experience (here and in Asia) LL gave me a contract to work full-time for $700/mo, plus accommodation and some other little benefits. That's pathetic. But I reeeeally needed a visa, so I signed it.
If I were to sign another contract, my salary would increase by a whopping $50/mo. It's just crap. This is not a cheap city to live in!
I worked for LL before, but only part-time. That's the way to go, because I didn't have split-shifts, didn't have to go running all over the city between a bunch of different schools, etc.
Just be warned, anyone thinking of signing a teaching contract...
The people there are decent, and LL does pay (almost always) on time. But I don't think that's anything to award medals for.

Bels
03-09-2007, 20:32
You probably had a package of flat, travel , and invitation with them. Bear it in mind when you seek offers from others. Do you know of any schools who are any better and pay much more. I'm afraid I don't and the best has gone unfortunately for experienced teachers and students. I'm talking bout the British Council. However if you are serious about settling in Moscow My opinion is that you have only two alternatives. Go freelance and negotiate your own fees, and ignore the ones with silly offers.

Even better get your own students, possibly one to one to start with but try to plan for groups as you develop. Please don't go cheap, you only discredit yourself.

kazachka
03-09-2007, 23:24
I get so disappointed when I see that there are still schools out there getting away with paying teachers sh!te. IT CHEAPENS THE PROFESSION! I knew a couple ppl who worked for LL in the past, and yes, it sucked. Recently, an alum from Beloit College (where I did undergrad) emailed me asking for candid advice as she'd looked into LL and BKC.
I basically put it this way: "You have busted your tail getting your qualifications and spent a pretty penny doing so. Now, would you work for Mc Donald's wages in your home country?! Well then why on Earth would you do it anywhere else?"

That said- know your worth and if you are qualified and experienced, it's certainly more than what some of these slave driver schools pay. I never signed my soul to a school. I went freelance from the beginning, but want to point out that I had established contacts here already as building a base of students takes time.
English Unlimited offers work permit, insurance, and about 2000$/mo for full timers. I freelanced for them to fill gaps in between private students. I ended up on a full time schedule at the time I quit because they had lots of classes. They are good folks and nice to work for, but having spent nine years working 7-about 3pm, the split shift crap was NOT for me. I used to come home in the afternoon and train then have to drag my tail back til late. Life is too short for this so I kept most of my privates and then took a governess job with Bonne. I no longer set an alarm in the morning. I get up feeling rested,run, then start moseying to work by mid afternoon. I now work M-th evenings and yeah it looks like I'll be sucking up a few Saturday afternoons here and there but I get paid well over the 15$/academic hour crap I hear schools pay and the kid is nice to work with.

Bels
05-09-2007, 00:37
It's all about supply and demand. You chose where you go and you accept what you get. If people chose to come to Russia for crappy offers then of course that's what the schools will offer. In my case I couldn't and I didn't accept. First of all I lived in the suburbs of Moscow and also I had a family, It wasn't long before I had offers from students that would far succeed the income offered from a school. And I didn,t have far to go to teach them. To me the EFL schools in Moscow and agents are only middlemen getting in the way of teachers and the demand required. They are stealing your money and lowering the quality for prospective students. After all all the good services and the total interest is the teacher. WE DON'T NEED AGENTS TO TAKE OUR MONEY

emelie.lund
06-09-2007, 21:18
Hi everyone!
I’m going to Moscow after new years, hopefully to work as a teacher when I get there. I’m not going to stay for very long, but at least 6 months. I will live with my boyfriend who works there.
Problem is, I have no idea where to look for a job, and where NOT to look. I heard that it’s a lot better, financially, to have a private employer and teach at someone’s house. ..?
I am not educated to be a teacher, but I have worked as a substitute teacher a lot and my English is good. (Great for a Russian I imagine.) I’d say I’m capable of teaching levels up to approximately 15 year old students. If there’s any interest in someone teaching Swedish, well- I’m an expert!
Can anyone help me? A good advice?

MeExpat
10-09-2007, 13:01
I couldn't agree more. I did some research a few yrs back, and some schools don't pay or pay half if class is cancelled within x amount of hours prior to the lesson. I always found this to be quite ridiculous. For example, last summer, I had to take recency credits to renew my teaching license. OK, I paid the tuition to MGU up front for x amount of hours of class. Now, regardless of whether I attended class every day, I still paid the same tuition and my instructors got paid. If I wanted to be lazy and cut cl**** that was my problem, not the teacher's and not the school's, and that's the way it should be. It's my loss not theirs. My teachers still spent time preparing for the lesson whether I chose to show up or not. Having been a high school teacher under contract WITH PAID PREP TIME, I could get into a nice discussion about teachers' rights. Good teachers spend a lot of time outside the classroom preparing too. No paid prep time and there would have been a strike, plain and simple!!!
I'm a tiny school with no cancellations policy right there. Just get this straight with my clientele and they have no prob whatsoever with this policy. Don't know what makes other schools grovel to customers.
Former Job for teachers,

thva
21-09-2007, 14:59
With 2 years of experience (here and in Asia) LL gave me a contract to work full-time for $700/mo, plus accommodation and some other little benefits. That's pathetic. But I reeeeally needed a visa, so I signed it.

I don't really understand why a visa would be an incentive to sign a contract with a school. Visas are easy to arrange - I always do my invite with Liga Konsulatant (Vadim rocks!) but there are other decent agencies out there too, and someone coming to Russia for the first time would find lots of them in advance by googling. And while the invite isn't cheap, you pay for it once and are set for the year.

What it seems a school could offer of value to a newcomer to Moscow is the accomodation - rents in Moscow, even in the outskirts where schools put their teachers, are very expensive, and this expense comes up every month. Also, someone without experience or connections here might find it nice to arrive with a place to stay already arranged.

The other thing a school can offer a newcomer, steady income right from the beginning (rather than just once you find and arrange private students) is of less value. If one is willing to work for a school, you'll end up with better conditions and won't need to sign a contract if you get in touch with one once you arrive. If you have the money to live for a few days upon arrival, a school would be only too happy to give you some hours (as few or many as you want, likely) as soon as you walk in their door. There is just too big a demand for us here, and not enough of us to fill it.

thva
21-09-2007, 15:07
Problem is, I have no idea where to look for a job, and where NOT to look. I heard that it’s a lot better, financially, to have a private employer and teach at someone’s house. ..?


Emilie, the place to look for a job is right here in this forum! In fact, I would speculate that if you advertise that you offer Swedish lessons, you might find some people interested. While the demand is not as high, certainly the supply is much lower too - I have never seen any other ads here offering Swedish!
And if this doesn't work out, you can probably find work as an English teacher, again through this forum. While you are not native, as a Swede you can advertise yourself as near-native (I have relatives there and know how well you all speak English). Just make sure you make it clear in your ad that you are Swedish, so no one confuses you with a Russian who speaks good English - you will benefit from the cachet of being a foreigner, regardless of your native language. You probably can't earn as much as we do, but you can likely earn more than the Russan English teachers.
As several of us have pointed out here, teaching for a school is only a last resort, but this can always be useful as a stop-gap measure if you don't have enough work otherwise.

Bels
22-09-2007, 15:51
I don't really understand why a visa would be an incentive to sign a contract with a school. Visas are easy to arrange - I always do my invite with Liga Konsulatant (Vadim rocks!) but there are other decent agencies out there too, and someone coming to Russia for the first time would find lots of them in advance by googling. And while the invite isn't cheap, you pay for it once and are set for the year.

What it seems a school could offer of value to a newcomer to Moscow is the accomodation - rents in Moscow, even in the outskirts where schools put their teachers, are very expensive, and this expense comes up every month. Also, someone without experience or connections here might find it nice to arrive with a place to stay already arranged.

The other thing a school can offer a newcomer, steady income right from the beginning (rather than just once you find and arrange private students) is of less value. If one is willing to work for a school, you'll end up with better conditions and won't need to sign a contract if you get in touch with one once you arrive. If you have the money to live for a few days upon arrival, a school would be only too happy to give you some hours (as few or many as you want, likely) as soon as you walk in their door. There is just too big a demand for us here, and not enough of us to fill it.

I totally agree with you about invitations and everything else stated. But be careful, you must be aware that you are not legal without an invitation from a school. However many do it and get away with it, and the schools don't seem to be bothered.

Bels
17-10-2007, 23:16
Hello everybody!

I am Russian, a moscovite and teach English as a foreign language. Officially I work for IPT school - a very good company with excellent conditions for the natives (pm me if you need the contacts). But the majority of my students are private ones, at the moment I have two students and four groups. I am very pleased with my job now due to the money paid and the schedule. Don't really know what to discuss here but will answer any questions risen.

Glad to see that you English as a foreign language. I would like to discuss your teaching methods. But first of all I would like to ask you what level are your groups? And at what age level?

Bels
17-10-2007, 23:25
Yes, moscowteachers.com seems to have died some time ago. It seems that things have got rather quiet in here as well. I'm about to begin my 12th year teaching (my how the years fly). I currently work as a governess for Bonne during the second half of the day. I fit in a few private students on my way to work 2-4 days a week at my own will.
Prior to that, I taught Russian and ESL (and Spanish too though I don't like to advertise that I have this qualification too) in Alaska for nine years. Most of that was at the high school and uni levels but I also had many a k-6 group after school that in turn fed into my high school program. I've lived in Russia off and on since 1990 and finally came here permanently in 2005.

Let's see...hmmm...what else... OK, those of you who know me know that I spend the rest of my time training as I'm also a semi professional runner. So, you may have seen me hanging out in the sports folder.This is my 10th season competing in Moscow and I'm coached by my significant other who in his heyday was the 10,000m USSR champion who now coaches the top distance dogs on the Team. Gee- perhaps I should offer conversational English during an easy run in the park:o:jester:

Welcome, with your kind of experience you will be vey helpful to others as we group more together. Please continue to contribute to this folder.

masharyk
10-11-2007, 23:06
I am a teacher in the US and am planning on moving to Moscow to teach. I have been looking at the private schools that are run in English. If anyoen has an advice or information please let me know.

Bels
10-11-2007, 23:18
I am a teacher in the US and am planning on moving to Moscow to teach. I have been looking at the private schools that are run in English. If anyoen has an advice or information please let me know.

Please ask your questions here on the forum as we can help better as a group. We can start with what private schools have you been looking at. Do any of them give you strong interest and where did you find these schools. Do you plan to apply from the United States from one of these schools?

Many heads is better than one as they say.

AndreyS
10-11-2007, 23:27
Please ask your questions here on the forum as we can help better as a group. We can start with what private schools have you been looking at. Do any of them give you strong interest and where did you find these schools. Do you plan to apply from the United States from one of these schools?

Many heads is better than one as they say.

We say just "two heads is better than one".

Bels
11-11-2007, 11:52
Or Two heads are better than one. I was sleepy last night :)

SalTheReturn
11-11-2007, 14:58
I think August is one of the quietest months, no work for teachers and many of the expats I wouldn't be surprised have been away abroad on their holidays. They may well be on their way back now and it be busier here soon. However I know that starting tomorrow I will be extremely busy. In fact busier than I have ever been. I won't have so much time on the computer.

Bonne International appears to be the only emplyer that seems to advertise offering a sensible income. Perhaps it's because it's an agency and claims just a commission.

no, there is at least another agency in Moscow I personally doing this way

you are right, the most serious ones would work on commission and leave at least 75% to the teacher

SalTheReturn
11-11-2007, 15:02
With 2 years of experience (here and in Asia) LL gave me a contract to work full-time for $700/mo, plus accommodation and some other little benefits. That's pathetic. But I reeeeally needed a visa, so I signed it.
If I were to sign another contract, my salary would increase by a whopping $50/mo. It's just crap. This is not a cheap city to live in!
I worked for LL before, but only part-time. That's the way to go, because I didn't have split-shifts, didn't have to go running all over the city between a bunch of different schools, etc.
Just be warned, anyone thinking of signing a teaching contract...
The people there are decent, and LL does pay (almost always) on time. But I don't think that's anything to award medals for.

you are right people are good there, very good

what it is bad it is having all these college guys who thinks 700dollars a month is an OK salary

if people keep having so little ambitions, things will never change

Bels
11-11-2007, 15:02
no, there is at least another agency in Moscow I personally doing this way

you are right, the most serious ones would work on commission and leave at least 75% to the teacher

I go for that one Sal.

AndreyS
11-11-2007, 15:05
Or Two heads are better than one. I was sleepy last night :)

Do you agree that it's pretty common to say IS in similar phrases.
I ll never forget a mother saying to her child in the street in London:
Shut up! There is no toilets here!

AndreyS
11-11-2007, 15:07
But always:

Police ARE investigating...

SalTheReturn
11-11-2007, 15:09
I don't really understand why a visa would be an incentive to sign a contract with a school. Visas are easy to arrange - I always do my invite with Liga Konsulatant (Vadim rocks!) but there are other decent agencies out there too, and someone coming to Russia for the first time would find lots of them in advance by googling. And while the invite isn't cheap, you pay for it once and are set for the year.

What it seems a school could offer of value to a newcomer to Moscow is the accomodation - rents in Moscow, even in the outskirts where schools put their teachers, are very expensive, and this expense comes up every month. Also, someone without experience or connections here might find it nice to arrive with a place to stay already arranged.

The other thing a school can offer a newcomer, steady income right from the beginning (rather than just once you find and arrange private students) is of less value. If one is willing to work for a school, you'll end up with better conditions and won't need to sign a contract if you get in touch with one once you arrive. If you have the money to live for a few days upon arrival, a school would be only too happy to give you some hours (as few or many as you want, likely) as soon as you walk in their door. There is just too big a demand for us here, and not enough of us to fill it.

people are free to act the way they wish and this is something we have to respect

personally i am schocked to see someone who has apparently lived enough in Moscow to sign a 700dollars a month contracts, but to each its own

i am also sick of hearing people to talk about the housing thing, what these big schools offer you are CRAP SHABBY FLATS WHERE YOU MUST FEEL ASHAMED TO LIVE IN

sometimes i wonder if people know what a real accomodation means

SalTheReturn
11-11-2007, 15:13
Emilie, the place to look for a job is right here in this forum! In fact, I would speculate that if you advertise that you offer Swedish lessons, you might find some people interested. While the demand is not as high, certainly the supply is much lower too - I have never seen any other ads here offering Swedish!
And if this doesn't work out, you can probably find work as an English teacher, again through this forum. While you are not native, as a Swede you can advertise yourself as near-native (I have relatives there and know how well you all speak English). Just make sure you make it clear in your ad that you are Swedish, so no one confuses you with a Russian who speaks good English - you will benefit from the cachet of being a foreigner, regardless of your native language. You probably can't earn as much as we do, but you can likely earn more than the Russan English teachers.
As several of us have pointed out here, teaching for a school is only a last resort, but this can always be useful as a stop-gap measure if you don't have enough work otherwise.

Swedish is quite an important language in the russian panorama, so if these girl can market herself right (even messaging to some well paying agencies with her profile would be great) results will be coming pretty soon

personally i have known a banker who hired a qualified (yes you have to act like you are qualified, this means for instance BRING TEACHING MATERIAL with you!!!) swedish teacher. She was charged in 2006 30dollars per academic hour and she had to go all the way to the teacher house

Bels
11-11-2007, 15:17
Do you agree that it's pretty common to say IS in similar phrases.
I ll never forget a mother saying to her child in the street in London:
Shut up! There is no toilets here!

Speech can be picked up in many different ways. There isn't a toilet here, or there aren't any toilets here. Besides we are all simplistic to our little children.

No, I would never say is for plural. But be careful of plural groups such as government and family.

Bels
11-11-2007, 16:01
Originally Posted by thva
I don't really understand why a visa would be an incentive to sign a contract with a school. Visas are easy to arrange - I always do my invite with Liga Konsulatant (Vadim rocks!) but there are other decent agencies out there too, and someone coming to Russia for the first time would find lots of them in advance by googling. And while the invite isn't cheap, you pay for it once and are set for the year.END OF QUOTE

Even with the old laws you would be working illegally, without an invitation from the actual school. However the new laws will simply make it more difficult for teachers without the appropriate invitation. You cannot buy these invitations from an agency for the purpose of employment to a school who hasn't the right to employ native speakers.

Yes, I've stated this one before.

Bels
11-11-2007, 16:17
people are free to act the way they wish and this is something we have to respect

personally i am schocked to see someone who has apparently lived enough in Moscow to sign a 700dollars a month contracts, but to each its own

i am also sick of hearing people to talk about the housing thing, what these big schools offer you are CRAP SHABBY FLATS WHERE YOU MUST FEEL ASHAMED TO LIVE IN

sometimes i wonder if people know what a real accomodation means

Yes, and a shared flat :( at that. It cuts out the family idea, doesn't it. Some teachers have also stated that they had to travel a long way to their work.

But I still say for those wish to come and work as a teacher for the first time, their only option is to go to one of the big two schools.

And here are their websites :

Language Link Corporate Site. Welcome to Language Link Russia (http://jobs.languagelink.ru/)

Teaching English in Russia | BKC-International House | ESL / EFL Jobs in Russia, in Moscow: ESL, EFL, TEFL Jobs. Teaching positions in Russia. (http://www.bkcih-moscow.com/)

AstraTeaching
11-11-2007, 20:59
Born in Moscow, grew up in NY, graduated from London. Currently teaching at two schools and have five private students. I teach only adults, on all levels, and only in the city center.

Bels
11-11-2007, 21:25
Born in Moscow, grew up in NY, graduated from London. Currently teaching at two schools and have five private students. I teach only adults, on all levels, and only in the city center.

Thanks and Welcome Astra. Hopefully we can bring you all together soon, broke into areas, and levels what you teach. Patience :) as I want a few more.

And then hopefully we can make a sticky, it will need to be updated as teachers come and go. CAN We ?? :) I think we already have the support. I s that right?

MickeyTong
11-11-2007, 21:35
Do you agree that it's pretty common to say IS in similar phrases.
I ll never forget a mother saying to her child in the street in London:
Shut up! There is no toilets here!
Andrey, a significant percentage of British people are functionally illiterate when they finish school. I've mentioned elsewhere that the average British voter cannot understand an argument of more than 25 words. Vernacular English in the UK is rife with dialect and poor grammar....you will hear things like: "there int (or ain't) no toilets", "we was", "you was", et.c.

Bels
11-11-2007, 21:51
Andrey, a significant percentage of British people are functionally illiterate when they finish school. I've mentioned elsewhere that the average British voter cannot understand an argument of more than 25 words. Vernacular English in the UK is rife with dialect and poor grammar....you will hear things like: "there int (or ain't) no toilets", "we was", "you was", et.c.


No!! I don't go with that at all. Our speech in the UK can be confusing for some. For those who are fully aware of grammar, of which British are the best, after all it's our language. But back to to our language, the spoken word may well be different, but that doesn't mean that we are not aware of our proper grammar when needed. The native form of speaking is very sophisticated and even our dictonories can keep pace with it. We have different ways of speaking throughout England, but that doesn't mean that any one of them are illiterate. WE have many accents and ways of speaking and YES!! No! we aint doing that is one of them. But going for an interview they will speak more formal. That;'s the secret, formal and informal speech

But Hey! I repeat, that's what makes us sophisticated and what second language speakers find difficult to cope with, once they come to our country.

And what does other Brits, Australians, Irish, North American, Canadians, west Indies, Africans, first language Native speaking English etc have to say about this. Yes?? there is an informal form of speech and a formal form of speech?

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 22:04
No!! I don't go with that at all. Our speech in the UK can be confusing for some. For those who are fully aware of grammar, of which British are the best, after all it's our language. But back to to our language, the spoken word may well be different, but that doesn't mean that we are not aware of our proper grammar when needed. The native form of speaking is very sophisticated and even our dictonories can keep pace with it. We have different ways of speaking throughout England, but that doesn't mean that any one of them are illiterate. WE have many accents and ways of speaking and YES!! No! we aint doing that is one of them. But going for an interview they will speak more formal. That;'s the secret, formal and informal speech

But Hey! I repeat, that's what makes us sophisticated and what second language speakers find difficult to cope with, once they come to our country.

I have to disagree with that - formal/informal hogwash.

Show me any book bels- that says that it's ohkay to say aint or we was.

The Queen's English indeed.

Pure laziness, as well as being uneducated. Granted, the same thing occurs in America, so no argument there. But again, I would like to point out that as an English teacher, it would be very WRONG to encourage such language, or even teach it, since other NATIVE speakers would immediately assume that person to be uneducated.


Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't make it right.

SalTheReturn
11-11-2007, 22:11
No!! I don't go with that at all. Our speech in the UK can be confusing for some. For those who are fully aware of grammar, of which British are the best, after all it's our language. But back to to our language, the spoken word may well be different, but that doesn't mean that we are not aware of our proper grammar when needed. The native form of speaking is very sophisticated and even our dictonories can keep pace with it. We have different ways of speaking throughout England, but that doesn't mean that any one of them are illiterate. WE have many accents and ways of speaking and YES!! No! we aint doing that is one of them. But going for an interview they will speak more formal. That;'s the secret, formal and informal speech

But Hey! I repeat, that's what makes us sophisticated and what second language speakers find difficult to cope with, once they come to our country.

And what does other Brits, Australians, Irish, North American, Canadians, west Indies, Africans, first language Native speaking English etc have to say about this. Yes?? there is an informal form of speech and a formal form of speech?

we, professional teachers of european languages, like to define the grammar awareness of english and american people the following way:
"the students with the weakest grammar basis if compared to all other world cultures"

Americans make it up for that by at least being very active learners in the sense they try hard to produce language even if they mistake. They are not afraid of mistaking. Hiperly-reserved Brits are very passive if compared to them.

what does it mean exactly "functionally illitterate"? Can they be also people who do not know how to spell? Never I will forget the spelling mistakes of my british university mate

Bels
11-11-2007, 22:12
I have to disagree with that - formal/informal hogwash.

Show me any book bels- that says that it's ohkay to say aint or we was.

The Queen's English indeed.

Pure laziness, as well as being uneducated. Granted, the same thing occurs in America, so no argument there. But again, I would like to point out that as an English teacher, it would be very WRONG to encourage such language, or even teach it, since other NATIVE speakers would immediately assume that person to be uneducated.


Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't make it right.

I think it does within reason. "We was" a big NO! NO! but we aint A big yes. Why?? because it's in our common spoken language, and you must accept. Although I haven't got the big Cambridge dictionary with slangs, because it's very expensive I can't confirm it. but believe me , if the Brits accept it as commonly spoken, then it has to be. Who's the authority to say it doesn't.

However as you said in teaching. No you don't teach bad grammar. But you do give students a light awareness as to what to expect in speech. And allow them realise that the spoken word may well be different to the formal written word.

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 22:15
dictionary.com

ain't /eɪnt/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[eynt] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
1. Nonstandard except in some dialects. am not; are not; is not.
2. Nonstandard. have not; has not; do not; does not; did not.
[Origin: 1770–80; var. of amn't (contr. of am not) by loss of m and raising with compensatory lengthening of a; cf. aren't]

—Usage note As a substitute for am not, is not, and are not in declarative sentences, ain't is more common in uneducated speech than in educated, but it occurs with some frequency in the informal speech of the educated, especially in the southern and south-central states. This is especially true of the interrogative use of ain't I? as a substitute for the formal and—to some—stilted am I not? or for aren't I?, considered by some to be ungrammatical, or for the awkward—and rare in American speech—amn't I? Some speakers avoid any of the preceding forms by substituting Isn't that so (true, the case)? Ain't occurs in humorous or set phrases: Ain't it the truth! She ain't what she used to be. It ain't funny. The word is also used for emphasis: That just ain't so! It does not appear in formal writing except for deliberate effect in such phrases or to represent speech. As a substitute for have not or has not and—occasionally in Southern speech—do not, does not, and did not, it is nonstandard except in similar humorous uses: You ain't heard nothin' yet! See also aren't.

MickeyTong
11-11-2007, 22:17
The BBC agrees with me.
BBC News | UK | One in five UK adults 'illiterate' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/811832.stm)

Functional illiteracy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:P_literature.svg" class="image"><img alt="P literature.svg" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1d/P_literature.svg/100px-P_literature.svg.png"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/thumb/1/1d/P_literature.svg/100px-P_literature.svg.png

"In the UK, according to the Daily Telegraph (14 June 2006) "one in six British adults lacks the literacy skills of an 11-year-old". The UK government's Department for Education reported in 2006 that 47 percent of school children left school at age 16 without having achieved a basic level in functional maths, and 42 percent fail to achieve a basic level of functional English. Every year 100,000 pupils leave school functionally illiterate, in the UK."

Yeah, it's great having a plethora of accents and dialects in the UK, but there are plenty of folk (native Brits, not immigrants or offspring of immigrants) who struggle to fill in an application for a job or social security benefit.

Clean32
11-11-2007, 22:19
I have to disagree with that - formal/informal hogwash.

Show me any book bels- that says that it's ohkay to say aint or we was.

The Queen's English indeed.

Pure laziness, as well as being uneducated. Granted, the same thing occurs in America, so no argument there. But again, I would like to point out that as an English teacher, it would be very WRONG to encourage such language, or even teach it, since other NATIVE speakers would immediately assume that person to be uneducated.


Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't make it right.

All though I hate to admit it, I would say you are correct.
I am possibly in the top 50% of posters as far as formal education goes ( possibly) with a Be and a Ba, as well as trade cert’s, advanced trade, and a heap of formal cert. as well as 2 diploma.
But I am called Illiterate, rather often on this site. And we all know why.
As far as Employment? Well, retired at the age of 39, I think says it all.

AndreyS
11-11-2007, 22:22
Andrey, a significant percentage of British people are functionally illiterate when they finish school. I've mentioned elsewhere that the average British voter cannot understand an argument of more than 25 words. Vernacular English in the UK is rife with dialect and poor grammar....you will hear things like: "there int (or ain't) no toilets", "we was", "you was", et.c.


THanks a lot, Mickey. It's useful.

AndreyS
11-11-2007, 22:26
Oh, guys, what a thing i ve provoked. It looks as if you were waiting for a signal! Thank you!

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 22:32
i just looked up ain't on wikipedia. and found this, i thought it was pretty cool -

The related word hain’t is an archaic and non-standard contraction meaning has not or have not.


i am going to use that word in a sentence sometime this week -

ivan - Have you been drinking ?

me - Nope, I hain't been all week.

;)

Bels
11-11-2007, 22:43
we, professional teachers of european languages, like to define the grammar awareness of english and american people the following way:
"the students with the weakest grammar basis if compared to all other world cultures"

Americans make it up for that by at least being very active learners in the sense they try hard to produce language even if they mistake. They are not afraid of mistaking. Hiperly-reserved Brits are very passive if compared to them.

what does it mean exactly "functionally illitterate"? Can they be also people who do not know how to spell? Never I will forget the spelling mistakes of my british university mate

Some very good points Sal. And how do you teach fluency? by encouraging students to speak, and understand what they are speaking about, and not to worry about errors, and then we we need to listen and understand what is spoken to us. No, for fluency practice we have no need to worry about mistakes. Concentrate on being understood and what's been said.

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 22:50
something i thought was cool -

An English speaker is in many cases able to choose between Germanic and Latinate synonyms: come or arrive; sight or vision; freedom or liberty. In some cases there is a choice between a Germanic derived word (oversee), a Latin derived word (supervise), and a French word derived from the same Latin word (survey). The richness of the language arises from the variety of different meanings and nuances such synonyms harbour, enabling the speaker to express fine variations or shades of thought. Familiarity with the etymology of groups of synonyms can give English speakers greater control over their linguistic register.

An exception to this and a peculiarity perhaps unique to English is that the nouns for meats are commonly different from, and unrelated to, those for the animals from which they are produced, the animal commonly having a Germanic name and the meat having a French-derived one. Examples include: deer and venison; cow and beef; swine/pig and pork, or sheep and mutton. This is assumed to be a result of the aftermath of the Norman invasion, where a French-speaking elite were the consumers of the meat, produced by English-speaking lower classes.

In everyday speech, the majority of words will normally be Germanic. If a speaker wishes to make a forceful point in an argument in a very blunt way, Germanic words will usually be chosen.

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 22:52
A majority of Latinate words (or at least a majority of content words) will normally be used in more formal speech and writing, such as a courtroom or an encyclopedia article. However, there are other Latinate words that are used normally in everyday speech and do not sound formal; these are mainly words for concepts that no longer have Germanic words, and are generally assimilated better and in many cases do not appear Latinate. For instance, the words mountain, valley, river, aunt, uncle, move, use, push and stay are all Latinate.

English easily accepts technical terms into common usage and often imports new words and phrases. Examples of this phenomenon include: cookie, Internet and URL (technical terms), as well as genre, über, lingua franca and amigo (imported words/phrases from French, German, modern Latin, and Spanish, respectively). In addition, slang often provides new meanings for old words and phrases. In fact, this fluidity is so pronounced that a distinction often needs to be made between formal forms of English and contemporary usage.

MickeyTong
11-11-2007, 23:03
Some very good points Sal. And how do you teach fluency? by encouraging students to speak, and understand what they are speaking about, and not to worry about errors, and then we we need to listen and understand what is spoken to us. No, for fluency practice we have no need to worry about mistakes. Concentrate on being understood and what's been said.

Absolutely. It may be encouraging for learners of English to know that many native speakers make many mistakes....

xSnoofovich
11-11-2007, 23:15
Absolutely. It may be encouraging for learners of English to know that many native speakers make many mistakes....


I wouldn't say encouraging, but I would say that it would be rather misleading........

Bels
11-11-2007, 23:16
Absolutely. It may be encouraging for learners of English to know that many native speakers make many mistakes....

I go for that, but don't we all

SalTheReturn
12-11-2007, 11:20
I go for that, but don't we all

No, not all Bels

if I compare my experience in university in UK and the same experience in 2 other countries (Estonia and Italy) I would say that the number of people having problem with spelling and grammar was much higher in the UK

just see how stuff are over here (ok, it is an internet forum and people write quickly) takes nothing to realize many dunno how to put a sentence together

Bels
12-11-2007, 11:40
Are you trying to say Estonia and Italy are better at English than Britain? No I don't buy that one at all.

And I was was talking about teaching fluency with speech. The err, umm, can you clarify that? No! what I meant was this etc. Speaking is not robotic, nor perfect in any language and students shouldn't fear speaking because of slight errors they might make in such a lesson. They should be encouraged to have discussions and debate without worrying about every error in the spoken word.

I was also talking about casual speech and locals idioms for example used in Native countries, which takes time to get used to. But it doesn't mean to say that they are illiterate, far from it. In one situation they may well be formal and sophisticated, and in another be informal.

SalTheReturn
12-11-2007, 12:39
Are you trying to say Estonia and Italy are better at English than Britain? No I don't buy that one at all.

And I was was talking about teaching fluency with speech. The err, umm, can you clarify that? No! what I meant was this etc. Speaking is not robotic, nor perfect in any language and students shouldn't fear speaking because of slight errors they might make in such a lesson. They should be encouraged to have discussions and debate without worrying about every error in the spoken word.

I was also talking about casual speech and locals idioms for example used in Native countries, which takes time to get used to. But it doesn't mean to say that they are illiterate, far from it. In one situation they may well be formal and sophisticated, and in another be informal.

so sorry mate

i thought you were saying that the same illiteracy registrated in english native speakers in their own language it is the same we would register in speakers of other languages with their own languages

the truth is that people from other cultures know how to spell words in their own language and have stronger grammar basis

Bels
12-11-2007, 18:36
so sorry mate

i thought you were saying that the same illiteracy registrated in english native speakers in their own language it is the same we would register in speakers of other languages with their own languages

the truth is that people from other cultures know how to spell words in their own language and have stronger grammar basis

I'm not so sure about that one either. There may may be a few exceptions, but I think The Brits, Americans etc are no different from any other country in mastering their own language. In fact, countries that are rich are likely to be much better educated in their own language, than third world countries for example.

Bels
12-11-2007, 19:08
I have to disagree with that - formal/informal hogwash.

Show me any book bels- that says that it's ohkay to say aint or we was.

The Queen's English indeed.

Pure laziness, as well as being uneducated. Granted, the same thing occurs in America, so no argument there. But again, I would like to point out that as an English teacher, it would be very WRONG to encourage such language, or even teach it, since other NATIVE speakers would immediately assume that person to be uneducated.


Just because everyone else is doing it, doesn't make it right.

Yes it would certainly be wrong to encourage such language.

However although it an incorrect form or slang it is widely used in the UK. and we can't ignore the word ain't.

You didn't look very far did you? A small Oxford Students dictionary:QUOTE:

ain't: Short form of are/is/am not, and have/has not

I ain't going, We ain't got any. :END OF QUOTE

So there you are, from the master book of English itself :) Officially recognised.

Bels
12-11-2007, 20:32
Absolutely. It may be encouraging for learners of English to know that many native speakers make many mistakes....

That's not what I said, I said that we should encourage students to speak within a lesson of speech fluency.

xSnoofovich
12-11-2007, 21:05
and here is my reply sir-

USAGE In modern English the use of ain’t is non-standard and should not be used in formal or written contexts, despite being widespread in many dialects and in informal speech.

AskOxford: ain't (http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/aint?view=uk)



Again, I say to you, show me any - ANY - English book that says that it is ok, and that we should teach it as ok.

Again, just because people use it, and it might be quite often, doesn't make it correct.

I would suggest, that you show me ONE time that Tony Blair said it, or for that matter, ANY other politician in an official speech.

Bels
12-11-2007, 21:34
and here is my reply sir-

USAGE In modern English the use of ain’t is non-standard and should not be used in formal or written contexts, despite being widespread in many dialects and in informal speech.

AskOxford: ain't (http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/aint?view=uk)



Again, I say to you, show me any - ANY - English book that says that it is ok, and that we should teach it as ok.

Again, just because people use it, and it might be quite often, doesn't make it correct.

I would suggest, that you show me ONE time that Tony Blair said it, or for that matter, ANY other politician in an official speech.

First of all I didn't bring up the argument of ain't. However the question has been answered. And if a student for example visits the UK and asks the question when they return, it should be answered.

My answer to your first paragraph, you don't teach it. But if the question is asked you should answer it either of it being informal or being incorrect, but widely used. Some students, depending on their circumstances need this information.

Answer to second paragraph, correct to whom? if it is widely used? some students should be aware of what is being said to them. However it all depends on the level of the student and the student's needs. They may well have a need to speak to a Brit in various circumstances.

Thirdly, Tony Blair has prepared speeches, he is not speaking from the top of his head so to speak. Therefore his speech is formal, and rightly so.

Therefore to sum it up, no you don't teach elementaries and pre-intermediates ain't. But you must explain it properly if the question arises.
And yes the word is heavily used and if heard it should be understood.

Bels
12-11-2007, 22:01
It's in the dictionary, ain't it :)

MickeyTong
13-11-2007, 00:04
It's only used by people what nobody ain't never learned to talk proper, innit, like.

"The British are special. The world knows it. In our innermost thoughts we know it. This is the greatest nation on earth."
Tony Blair, famous for making many statements which were not entirely accurate........

AndreyS
13-11-2007, 00:10
It's only used by people what nobody ain't never learned to talk proper, innit, like.

"The British are special. The world knows it. In our innermost thoughts we know it. This is the greatest nation on earth."
Tony Blair, famous for making many statements which were not entirely accurate........

Mickey, pls explain what is incorrect in his speech. Should it be "They are the greatest..."? Is this the only inaccuracy?

MickeyTong
13-11-2007, 00:16
Mickey, pls explain what is incorrect in his speech. Should it be "They are the greatest..."? Is this the only inaccuracy?

Andrey, Blair's speech is grammatically accurate: but he has been known to say things which were not factually accurate.

AndreyS
13-11-2007, 00:20
Thanks. I remember, he is Oxford graduate. But tends to massage facts.
I like listening to him as I understand him completely.

SalTheReturn
13-11-2007, 01:37
I'm not so sure about that one either. There may may be a few exceptions, but I think The Brits, Americans etc are no different from any other country in mastering their own language. In fact, countries that are rich are likely to be much better educated in their own language, than third world countries for example.

please bels have the decency to let teachers of other languages to have a say on that

Bels
13-11-2007, 10:22
please bels have the decency to let teachers of other languages to have a say on that

Hopefully, unlike you they will have facts to back up their argument.

SalTheReturn
13-11-2007, 10:33
Hopefully, unlike you they will have facts to back up their argument.

unlike me?

having received my training in Florence I met plenty of illitterate Brits making the "italian language experience" and was shocked to see how they could not put up with their classmates who were ways faster at picking grammar

my classes consisted of students of 5/6 different nationalities each time

also please ask a foreign student who was in the UK if he did not notice the "illitteracy" of Brits

you take care

Bels
13-11-2007, 10:42
Mickey, pls explain what is incorrect in his speech. Should it be "They are the greatest..."? Is this the only inaccuracy?

Yes, please clarify what's wrong. :)

Bels
13-11-2007, 10:44
unlike me?

having received my training in Florence I met plenty of illitterate Brits making the "italian language experience" and was shocked to see how they could not put up with their classmates who were ways faster at picking grammar

my classes consisted of students of 5/6 different nationalities each time

also please ask a foreign student who was in the UK if he did not notice the "illitteracy" of Brits

you take care


As you are attacking the educated British society on their own grammar and spelling, give me the facts and the proof. Because I don't believe you :)

SalTheReturn
13-11-2007, 10:53
As you are attacking the educated British society on their own grammar and spelling, give me the facts and the proof. Because I don't believe you :)

whatever...:groan::groan::groan:

Bels
13-11-2007, 11:56
Let's not forget that this is a teachers thread, promoting the get together of teachers and promoting the English language and lessons to get students.

Such critical and unfounded comments of the British English language can only have a negative effect for all who teach English.

SalTheReturn
13-11-2007, 14:07
Let's not forget that this is a teachers thread, promoting the get together of teachers and promoting the English language and lessons to get students.

Such critical and unfounded comments of the British English language can only have a negative effect for all who teach English.


:groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan::groan:

MickeyTong
13-11-2007, 17:17
Yes, please clarify what's wrong. :)
Bels, I answered this question for Andrey S. There is nothing grammatically wrong with Bliar's (deliberate spelling error) speech, but the factual accuracy of some of his statements is questionable.

AndreyS
13-11-2007, 17:52
Bels, I answered this question for Andrey S. There is nothing grammatically wrong with Bliar's (deliberate spelling error) speech, but the factual accuracy of some of his statements is questionable.


Mickey, it's getting more interesting. Why did you make this deliberate misspelling? Does Bliar sound indecent or funny or smth like that? Or it sounds like cockney pronunciation?

Bels
13-11-2007, 18:17
Mickey, it's getting more interesting. Why did you make this deliberate misspelling? Does Bliar sound indecent or funny or smth like that? Or it sounds like cockney pronunciation?

A headline statement B Liar, get it?

AndreyS
13-11-2007, 18:46
A headline statement B Liar, get it?

Shame. I should have guessed myself.

MickeyTong
13-11-2007, 21:57
Mickey, it's getting more interesting. Why did you make this deliberate misspelling? Does Bliar sound indecent or funny or smth like that? Or it sounds like cockney pronunciation?

Hehehehe........B Liar is how I intended it. But Tony Blia is also an appropriate (albeit indecent Russian word) appellation.

Bels
13-11-2007, 22:05
Hehehehe........B Liar is how I intended it. But Tony Blia is also an appropriate (albeit indecent Russian word) appellation.

Now you've lost me, apart from cockney pronounciation :doh:

Bels
13-11-2007, 22:24
May I assume that all posts here are interested in getting together as a directory of teachers? Covering areas of, language, area you reside, levels, and age groups. Let me start: I hope to start this directory soon, if possible it is hoped it may be a sticky that can be edited. Maybe as it's not my control. I will also assist in PMs.

For the time being just put a post similar to mine, and any contributions to improve in my idea is welcome. For the time being we are still on experimental stage

TEACHING ENGLISH. BRITISH NATIVE SPEAKER:

Bels:
Language: Teach English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Western region, 25 km from Moledosniya, all students must come to me. I will accept no other area.
Groups: Groups up to nine
One to one: Limited choice in hours but available.
Levels: All levels, but popular levels for time being from Beginner to Upper Intermediate.
Age groups: Children and teenagers most popular, a few current adults in intermediate business and upper Intermediate.

Bels
13-11-2007, 22:31
Of course I could expand on my above post, but I do believe on quick reference for the time being. My concern mainly is conv=enience of area for teachers. I do believe you should try to keep in the area you reside or is convenient for you from your work example.

AstraTeaching
20-11-2007, 23:03
TEACHING ENGLISH. NATIVE SPEAKER:

AstraTeaching:
Language: Teach Russian and English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Central Moscow only (within the Ring Line)
Groups: Groups up to 5, but not avaliable at the moment
One to one: No time slots avaliable at the moment
Levels: All levels, including Business English and cross-cultural communication.
Age groups: Adults only, 18+.

Bels
20-11-2007, 23:32
TEACHING ENGLISH. NATIVE SPEAKER:

AstraTeaching:
Language: Teach Russian and English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Central Moscow only (within the Ring Line)
Groups: Groups up to 5, but not avaliable at the moment
One to one: No time slots avaliable at the moment
Levels: All levels, including Business English and cross-cultural communication.
Age groups: Adults only, 18+.

Thanks Astra, Groups not available at the moment?? One to one not available at the moment?? Adults only?? fine, but I assume evening and weekends as it's only adults.

Well done, it sounds like me, your busiest time of the year and you are working about 40 hours teaching in groups at least, same as me. Although I might be be able to fit in a few more within certain groups.

But may I suggest that you promote a waiting list for January or March for example. Times get quieter in the Summer for me , perhaps for you. I've now got a waiting list, have you. I'm teaching you about marketing hopefully.

Thank you Astra, I will collate your info, and I will hope from some support from Ezic eventually if we can have some form of a sticky with a directory of all teachers here in the criteria of area, age groups, levels etc. Hopefully it can be updated as I have already stated teachers come and go. I've been around for for four years at least, looks like I'm stuck here for a few more years yet :)

Please! more entries,we will get there eventually.

AstraTeaching
21-11-2007, 05:30
Thanks Astra, Groups not available at the moment?? One to one not available at the moment?? Adults only?? fine, but I assume evening and weekends as it's only adults.

Well done, it sounds like me, your busiest time of the year and you are working about 40 hours teaching in groups at least, same as me. Although I might be be able to fit in a few more within certain groups.

But may I suggest that you promote a waiting list for January or March for example. Times get quieter in the Summer for me , perhaps for you. I've now got a waiting list, have you. I'm teaching you about marketing hopefully.

Thank you Astra, I will collate your info, and I will hope from some support from Ezic eventually if we can have some form of a sticky with a directory of all teachers here in the criteria of area, age groups, levels etc. Hopefully it can be updated as I have already stated teachers come and go. I've been around for for four years at least, looks like I'm stuck here for a few more years yet :)

Please! more entries,we will get there eventually.

I actually don't work on weekends (well, except one tiny little lesson Saturday morning:). As for the waiting list, I have contracts with groups till June, and individual committments till that time as well. Since I'm not in the country July and August, no sense in waiting list , except one for September which I will start in May.
I don't have any free time slots at the moment, so I will only take a person on as an exception.

iamjustinmiller
22-11-2007, 16:56
why not?

TEACHING ENGLISH. AMERICAN NATIVE SPEAKER:

Iamjustinmiller:
Language: Teach English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Center, southeast, and red metro line.
Groups: Groups up to six
One to one: available, weekends are best.
Levels: Intermediate to advanced. Can also teach Business English
Age groups: No age restriction.

Bels
22-11-2007, 23:08
As stated many time on this thread, I intend to make a directory of all teachers willing to join this directory.

The information required will be, the convenient area in which you wish to teach, and the level of students you wish to teach. It will also require whether you wish to teach only adults, or children, or both. Also whether you have the facilities to teach groups, or whether you can only do one to one. Whether you can teach at your place or whether you can teach at their place, or both.

Hopefully Ezik can back us up on this one, I will collate all the teachers adverts together and make a thread of teachers offers listed with the above criteria. I will place it in the lessons section , and hopefully it will be made a sticky. It should be edited or changed at the end of every month, because as we know teachers come and go.

I will place all teachers on this directory 29th November 2007. So pleas, teachers who wish to be included in this directory please make your post here now or before this date.

Any teachers who have offers of which they cannot do, i.e.; you don’t teach children, the person is in the wrong area. You don’t visit student in their own home. Believe me. I have given many refusals, but it would be nice if we could refer them to the right teacher.

So please teachers help others out, the students and the teachers, use this directory and refer them to the right teacher. Let’s help each other out.

Let’s give it a go, there might be some mistakes, but we can improve as we go along and continue positively with this idea.

Any productive comments and ideas will be most welcome.

th&vk
23-11-2007, 10:36
This is a great idea - thanks Bels for pushing it along for us.

th&vk
English with USA native-speaking teacher
Business, General, TOEFL
Student’s location: Central Moscow only
Teacher’s location: Tekstilshiki (considerable discount for lessons at teacher’s location)
One-to-one and small groups (up to 6)
All levels
Adults, young adults (sorry, no children)

Bels
01-12-2007, 21:54
I get so disappointed when I see that there are still schools out there getting away with paying teachers sh!te. IT CHEAPENS THE PROFESSION! I knew a couple ppl who worked for LL in the past, and yes, it sucked. Recently, an alum from Beloit College (where I did undergrad) emailed me asking for candid advice as she'd looked into LL and BKC.
I basically put it this way: "You have busted your tail getting your qualifications and spent a pretty penny doing so. Now, would you work for Mc Donald's wages in your home country?! Well then why on Earth would you do it anywhere else?"

That said- know your worth and if you are qualified and experienced, it's certainly more than what some of these slave driver schools pay. I never signed my soul to a school. I went freelance from the beginning, but want to point out that I had established contacts here already as building a base of students takes time.
English Unlimited offers work permit, insurance, and about 2000$/mo for full timers. I freelanced for them to fill gaps in between private students. I ended up on a full time schedule at the time I quit because they had lots of classes. They are good folks and nice to work for, but having spent nine years working 7-about 3pm, the split shift crap was NOT for me. I used to come home in the afternoon and train then have to drag my tail back til late. Life is too short for this so I kept most of my privates and then took a governess job with Bonne. I no longer set an alarm in the morning. I get up feeling rested,run, then start moseying to work by mid afternoon. I now work M-th evenings and yeah it looks like I'll be sucking up a few Saturday afternoons here and there but I get paid well over the 15$/academic hour crap I hear schools pay and the kid is nice to work with.

Check my bold on your quoted post to know what I'm referring to. Would you recommend English Unlimited as a school for teachers. Do they include accommadation and travel within this package. Would you also recommend Bonne. I met with this agency, however I didn't get any offers of the income they advertised, so I told them to forget it. I get higher offers from families now direct, but too late as am busy teaching groups 5 minutes walk from where I live. So you can get these families yourself, once you have got local reputation and they find you somehow and contact you direct.

So to summarise, would it not be a good idea to also make a directory of good decent schools and agencies suitable for the employment of teachers?

I might make a new thread stressing this, however others are welcome in starting it. I wouldn't like another complaining that I am a monopoliser :) We are all free and welcome to come up with new ideas and make our own threads here. In fact I'm all for teachers coming up with ideas and starting new threaads here

SalTheReturn
01-12-2007, 22:10
Check my bold on your quoted post to know what I'm referring to. Would you recommend English Unlimited as a school for teachers. Do they include accommadation and travel within this package. Would you also recommend Bonne. I met with this agency, however I didn't get any offers of the income they advertised, so I told them to forget it. I get higher offers from families now direct, but too late as am busy teaching groups 5 minutes walk from where I live. So you can get these families yourself, once you have got local reputation and they find you somehow and contact you direct.

So to summarise, would it not be a good idea to also make a directory of good decent schools and agencies suitable for the employment of teachers?

I might make a new thread stressing this, however others are welcome in starting it. I wouldn't like another complaining that I am a monopoliser :) We are all free and welcome to come up with new ideas and make our own threads here. In fact I'm all for teachers coming up with ideas and starting new threaads here

you are doing a great job Bels, really

directory for good/bad schools it would not be tolerated...
too many soon-to-be-teachers-in-Moscow are going through this site and might refuse their deal after reading couple of stuff
this might bother lots of establishment incl. the most famous ones

Bels
01-12-2007, 22:46
The new area directory of Teachers: Welcome teachers.

This is the list of teachers of what I have now for Moscow and the Moscow region. I am giving it another week and am now entering this post and request into another thread. PLEASE!! No irrelevant babble on this thread, strictly discussions for the new directory. We need more teachers and I’m going to give it another week. Once entered in the directory there might be no more additions for one month. The design of the directory needs to be discussed further, as I see now some complications of what the design of this forum can allow. I’ve got some ideas, but for now please enter your details in the new thread. And NO GOING OFF TOPIC PLEASE.AS YOU WILL CONFUSE ME IN BUILDING THE DIRECTORY.

PLEASE ENTER YOUR DETAILS NOW:



OBLAST AREAS: WESTERN REGION

BELS:
Nationality: British
Language: Teach English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Western region, 25 km from metro station Molodezhnaya, along the Rublievskie shosse and close to the uspienskie shosse, all students must come to me. I will accept travelling to no other area.
Groups: Groups up to nine
One to one: Limited choice in hours but available. Children only
Levels: All levels, but popular levels for time being from Beginner to Upper Intermediate.
Age groups: Children and teenagers most popular. No adults..


MOSCOW AREA

AstraTeaching:
Nationality: Native speaker
Language: Teach Russian and English as a foreign or second language.
Area: Central Moscow only (within the Ring Line)
Groups: Groups up to 5, but not available at the moment
One to one: No time slots available at the moment
Levels: All levels, including Business English and cross-cultural communication.
Age groups: Adults only, 18+.



Iamjustinmiller:
Nationality: American, native speaker
Language: Teach English as a foreign or second language

Bels
01-12-2007, 22:59
you are doing a great job Bels, really

directory for good/bad schools it would not be tolerated...
too many soon-to-be-teachers-in-Moscow are going through this site and might refuse their deal after reading couple of stuff
this might bother lots of establishment incl. the most famous ones

You've made a good point sal, are their any more opinions?
Sorry no greenies again, I'm rationed :)

kazachka
01-12-2007, 23:06
Check my bold on your quoted post to know what I'm referring to. Would you recommend English Unlimited as a school for teachers. Do they include accommadation and travel within this package. Would you also recommend Bonne. I met with this agency, however I didn't get any offers of the income they advertised, so I told them to forget it. I get higher offers from families now direct, but too late as am busy teaching groups 5 minutes walk from where I live. So you can get these families yourself, once you have got local reputation and they find you somehow and contact you direct.

So to summarise, would it not be a good idea to also make a directory of good decent schools and agencies suitable for the employment of teachers?

I might make a new thread stressing this, however others are welcome in starting it. I wouldn't like another complaining that I am a monopoliser :) We are all free and welcome to come up with new ideas and make our own threads here. In fact I'm all for teachers coming up with ideas and starting new threaads here

English Unlimited is a good starter job. They offer visa reimbursement /work visa 500$ toward airfare home each yr. There are better deals out there. Bonne I'd have recommended til the visa sh!t hit the fan:( They are still in a mess and I'm going to have to probably end up quitting a really good job and defect to a business school that offered me a bit more salary then I get at Bonne plus the WORK VISA. I can't wait to do all the fun med tests. Can anyone suggest a FEMALE GYN for this? I have one at Taganskaya if I can just go to her......

IraM
01-12-2007, 23:50
Area: Western region, 25 km from Moledosniya, Bels, sorry for my pedantic 5 cents but maybe your ad/profile data need some spelling checking? Probably it will help your students-to-be locate you better?
Do you mean 25 km from metro station Molodezhnaya?

Bels
02-12-2007, 00:21
I do indeed :) excuse my Russian translation. I will correct it in the permanent directory. But let's get it going, we will make it perfect in the end. It may take some time, but doing things is the first priority.

Bels
02-12-2007, 00:42
[QUOTE=kazachka;316354]English Unlimited is a good starter job. They offer visa reimbursement /work visa 500$ toward airfare home each yr. There are better deals out there. Bonne I'd have recommended til the visa sh!t hit the fan:( They are still in a mess and I'm going to have to probably end up quitting a really good job and defect to a business school that offered me a bit more salary then I get at Bonne plus the WORK VISA. I can't wait to do all the fun med tests. Can anyone suggest a FEMALE GYN for this? I have one at Taganskaya if I can just go to her......[/QUOT

Thanks, good info and I might start this directory after all. Visa Unlimited I will look into, and perhaps Bonne, although at the moment I think they overstate their claims. I would like more feed back on this company. Perhaps might be ok for residents with an entrepeurs licence? Fees go up I'm afraid:)
Not our doing, russian laws I'm sorry to say.

Please, schools, agents, teachers, respond here and be open and market yourselves. Yoa all appear to be afraid of marketing yourselves. You keeep hiding. and being limited on your identity. Why is that !!!!

SalTheReturn
02-12-2007, 01:27
Bels, sorry for my pedantic 5 cents but maybe your ad/profile data need some spelling checking? Probably it will help your students-to-be locate you better?
Do you mean 25 km from metro station Molodezhnaya?

and he yet does not know how to use properly the quoting system:bookworm:

Bels
02-12-2007, 11:51
and he yet does not know how to use properly the quoting system:bookworm:

Or perhaps I'm ignoring un-important issues and trying to target with my priorities. Do you want to be in this directory Sal?

SalTheReturn
02-12-2007, 13:24
Or perhaps I'm ignoring un-important issues and trying to target with my priorities. Do you want to be in this directory Sal?

oh yeah send me other students to italy!!!

PS. seriously i recognize you are an expert when comes to the teaching world. If i will even get back to Moscow I will first consult with you to set my rates, and yet I wanna you guiding me through the process of reaching full english writing proficiency. The truth Bels that if I could write as a native, my professional chances would dramatically increase.

Bels
02-12-2007, 14:11
oh yeah send me other students to italy!!!

PS. seriously i recognize you are an expert when comes to the teaching world. If i will even get back to Moscow I will first consult with you to set my rates, and yet I wanna you guiding me through the process of reaching full english writing proficiency. The truth Bels that if I could write as a native, my professional chances would dramatically increase.

Only kidding, But you are coming to Moscow in December, aren't you?

Also which native writing are you talking about? English or Italian :)

SalTheReturn
02-12-2007, 14:50
Only kidding, But you are coming to Moscow in December, aren't you?

Also which native writing are you talking about? English or Italian :)

I want to be able to write articles in english, this is my 2008's aim

will show you some work i did in britain for the university, i think back in 2000/2001 my writing was not so bad...

then i got back to italy, started studying other languages and it all went **** all

Bels
09-12-2007, 15:34
To get back on topic :) Teachers!

For those who are looking for teaching jobs with proper visa back-up, the vacancy section in Expat.ru is looking very interesting.

I get the impression that the are competing to find teachers and the income is getting higher all the time. Good news for teachers. No longer the miserable $800 a month I think. But be careful in comparing those with the full package and those who give no package.

Some of you may prefer being private but might this school invitation to avoid the 90 days restriction might interest some of you.

Vacancies :: Moscow's virtual community for English speaking expats and Russians (http://expat.ru/vacancies.php)