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View Full Version : Not to old to teach



kevinenslin
23-08-2007, 21:26
Just to let you teachers out there know that as far as I concerned there is
no age barrier. I teach in Santos, Brazil and I'm 58. I teach English. UP THE OLDIES!
Kevin Enslin:hooray:

Bels
23-08-2007, 21:49
I'm 52 and teaching near Moscow. Mature teachers appear to be more popular, hence it's definitely an asset.

Did I see that this was the teachers folder, if so Hurray! and at last!

Bels
25-08-2007, 21:48
Yep! You are never too old to teach, I met a guy once in the western region region of Moscow who was a retired policeman teaching ESL, and when in my Summer job iUK I met a school headmaster who took a trinity EFL course and wanted to start teaching EFL. Amazing isn't it. Both were previously on a much higher salary obviously.

kazachka
30-08-2007, 15:17
I am a governess for Bonne. All clients are different, but when I interviewed with them initially and met the mother of the child I now teach, she came right out and said she wanted someone over 30 because she felt an older,more experienced teacher would be more responsible with her child. Other goveernesses I've met are in their 30s and 40s.

Bels
30-08-2007, 18:58
I've heard so much from my current students also, the teachers that they were placed with were either teenagers or in their early twenties. They were rather embarrassed to be taught with "Kids" but thankfully they found me. I can understand the parents concern, How can you take care of a child if you haven't personally experienced it in the past. Also there is something about maturity.

MissX
09-09-2007, 16:06
You know, I think there should be teacher for all the ages... My previous boss ran away from the corporate teacher and asked me to teach him Russian as the teacher was too old and boring. It's all the matter of preferences :-)
I'm 25, I have a linguistic degree and I've been teaching for 4 years. I really enjoy doing that! And fortunately none of my students changed me for somebody else with more experience.

kazachka
09-09-2007, 23:33
Much also depends on methodology and approach. Some ppl appear to be 'old and boring' often because they do the same thing year in and year out and never change their approach and methods to keep up with the times. Yes, these folks should consider retiring.
Education is a field that is constantly changing and evolving. New ways of presenting material in order to better accomodate students' needs are being developed all the time. It's up to the teacher to keep current in the field.

MeExpat
10-09-2007, 12:39
Heard that old wisdom "A good teacher explains, a gifted one shows and a brilliant inspires" That inspiration stuff in you somewhat wanes with years...
Though I saw a 40 sh teacher delivering a breathtaking class whilst hardly speaking himself. Too much teacher talk is an inherent problem with native teachers after all, huh?

Bels
23-09-2007, 11:26
Much also depends on methodology and approach. Some ppl appear to be 'old and boring' often because they do the same thing year in and year out and never change their approach and methods to keep up with the times. Yes, these folks should consider retiring.
Education is a field that is constantly changing and evolving. New ways of presenting material in order to better accomodate students' needs are being developed all the time. It's up to the teacher to keep current in the field.

I'm glad you said some. Hopefully older teachers strive to improve and up-date their teaching practises until the day they retire.There are some who choose to change career and start teaching EFL for enjoyment on their retirement.

Bels
12-10-2007, 22:54
Just to let you teachers out there know that as far as I concerned there is
no age barrier. I teach in Santos, Brazil and I'm 58. I teach English. UP THE OLDIES!
Kevin Enslin:hooray:

I don't usually do this. But the quote is sticking out like a sore tumb every day I look at this web-site. Not to old to teach. You cant possibly be a native teacher. I really must comment, you should be able to inform your students of the difference of to and too.

Sometimes critisism is necessary especially if you fear it may spread as some sort of infection.

Pyotr
21-11-2007, 20:23
I don't usually do this. But the quote is sticking out like a sore tumb every day I look at this web-site. Not to old to teach. You cant possibly be a native teacher. I really must comment, you should be able to inform your students of the difference of to and too.

Sometimes critisism is necessary especially if you fear it may spread as some sort of infection.

"critisism"?

"tumb"?

Bels
21-11-2007, 21:18
OOPS! But hopefully you've read my many posts where the same words were typed correctly. Simply typing errors.

Pyotr
16-12-2007, 01:27
I completely understnad, as I also occasionally make typos.

It's just that it doesn't create a great impression when a poster who advertises himself as an English teacher doesn't check his text before submitting.

Sorry I'm being picky my intention is not to needle you but rather to let you know that readers do pay attention to what is being published.

(Maybe you could invest in a Mac, or use Safari for Windows. My spelling mistake in the first line of the reply window has a huge red line under it.)

Bels
16-12-2007, 12:37
Very true, and I wasn't being particularily nasty about my comment. It's just that it's on a permanent heading,and sticks out like a sore thumb.

I am confident that members will judge my writing in general. Through the vast number of posts I have made on this forum.

Bels
16-12-2007, 12:40
I rarely use word processers for communicating on forums, it would be too slow and boring. Just type immediately what comes to your head. Forget the mac.

SalTheReturn
16-12-2007, 13:51
Heard that old wisdom "A good teacher explains, a gifted one shows and a brilliant inspires" That inspiration stuff in you somewhat wanes with years...
Though I saw a 40 sh teacher delivering a breathtaking class whilst hardly speaking himself. Too much teacher talk is an inherent problem with native teachers after all, huh?

no thats average tefl demagogy

i sometimes get pissed at my russian tutor coz she talks too much but the beautiful thing it is that she gets a lot involved in what we talk about (we come across quite interesting issues) so she goes fast, angry, so i interrupt her and ask to speak up, but she interrupt and go all over again
it can be a one hour conversation fight during which she surely prevails being a native speaker and i lose, but meantimes my listening skills are dramatically improved as same as i do not have to ask a lot about slowing down

with my spanish teacher with who we discuss Chavez, things may get even worst because it is much more difficult to interrupt him, hence this is a real conversation where shyness does not pay off and some rude manners are required sometimes

sorry but talking in broken russian/spanish to my schoolmate it has never been my cup of tea

you all take care

SalTheReturn
16-12-2007, 13:53
I completely understnad, as I also occasionally make typos.

It's just that it doesn't create a great impression when a poster who advertises himself as an English teacher doesn't check his text before submitting.

Sorry I'm being picky my intention is not to needle you but rather to let you know that readers do pay attention to what is being published.

(Maybe you could invest in a Mac, or use Safari for Windows. My spelling mistake in the first line of the reply window has a huge red line under it.)

i do not think Bels have to care for this, we all know he is standing out as a real professional in the Moscow's scene

he can allow himself couple of typos and surely he will not make them when writing his ads

Bels
27-12-2007, 18:51
Good point sal, I'm sure all of us are typiing here quickly in home of different family conditions for example, not all of us have the luxury of a quiete undisturbed study.

However in writing something serious and formal, such as advertising as a teacher offering your services. I would take care and write it in a wordprocesser. I would then check it the next morning before posting it. Do I do this? NO :) Do as I say, and not what I do.

At the moment I have my 20 month son shouting at me "Daddy" and banging a cup demanding my attention. Everything is normal with many interruptions :)

sixfootwo
04-01-2008, 20:18
Speaking as a 54 yo native Brit EFL teacher....I have been teaching EFL (if you join up all the weeks) for just 1 year.
It's my second career. I worked my way up to the top of my only other profession and then took the money.

I'd just like to say that I really enjoy the age mix of my EFL Teacher colleagues. Strangely enough, during and since my CELTA, I do strike up very good rapport with my students, and although I have had a really interesting working life, I always refrain from talking about it as it leads inevitably to OTT TTT !!
However I think a good two way dialogue with intermediate and above students is a useful way of using the students as a resource to help them with 1) accuracy 2) idioms and expressions and 3) especially vocab extension...as well as functional language for opinions, agreeing etc etc.

I am always in awe of EFL teachers (of whom there are many) who can make lessons seem such a breeze and enjoyable experience AND where the students have learnt without really realising it (ie they've felt no pain). I can't do that very often yet...but it's what I try to do every day.

rusmeister
19-02-2008, 06:04
Wasn't Yoda 900 years old? :)