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DPG
10-11-2003, 20:30
Here I am sitting at work, moderately bored and more importantly absolutely bloody starving!!

So on the subject of what is foremost in my mind at present (food!) I pose you the question: If you could eat absolutely anything in the world right now, what would it be???

DJ Biscuit
10-11-2003, 20:37
Pork pie, cornish pastie, yorkies, rhubarb crumble to name a few...

machine
10-11-2003, 20:46
Miso soup, chicken teryaki, tempura, tuna sashimi, edamame, a bottle of sake and Asahi beer.

Are you convinced? It's gonna be Japanese tonight, isn't it?:D

investor
10-11-2003, 21:58
mmmm.............I'd eat some meat with fries, maybe pizza even.............and some salad.....................and.......................I'd agry to eat cheasburger even.............

Would be glad to eat anything...........................

investor
10-11-2003, 21:59
mmmm.............I'd eat some meat with fries, maybe pizza even.............and some salad.....................and.......................I'd agry to eat burger even.............

Would be glad to eat anything...........................

investor
10-11-2003, 22:00
And maybe this.............

machine
10-11-2003, 22:08
No wonder you've chosen the pig for your avatar:D


















Sorry, dear, I just couldn't resist:)

Sadie
10-11-2003, 22:17
Originally posted by investor
And maybe this.............
secretary in my office had this caviar burger as wallpapers on the screen of her pc :), we replaced it with this

machine
10-11-2003, 22:18
Originally posted by Sadie
secretary in my office had this caviar burger as wallpapers on the screen of her pc :), we replaced it with this

Bwa-ha-ha-ha!!! Good one!!!:D :D :D

Sadie
10-11-2003, 22:21
Originally posted by machine
Bwa-ha-ha-ha!!! Good one!!!:D :D :D
yeah, she liked it too;)

geofizz56
11-11-2003, 08:30
Good way to kill an appetite, too.

Yuck!

trebor
11-11-2003, 08:42
I've found and cooked rhubarb in a crumble here in Russia. I served it with some hot custard. I could say it was almost better than sex!

investor
11-11-2003, 09:34
Machine, I'll never forgive you for this......

machine
11-11-2003, 10:47
Originally posted by investor
Machine, I'll never forgive you for this......

Oh, please, please, forgive me, I was such an idiot.

lochnessmonster
11-11-2003, 11:14
1/ the local chippie does them JUST the way they should be, fried twice, good sprinkling of salt and vinegar, and you get to play a silly slot machine while you wait. Wrapped up in newspaper, you end up eating half of them before you get home.(When I say 'local' I don't mean Moscow!

2/ Popping into Sainsbury's just as the bread is coming out of the oven. Grabbing a loaf and a pot of hummous and a bottle of Australian red (the one EVERYONE in England seems to be drinking right now)

3/ Marmite (OF COURSE) on warm toast with sliced red onions on top. (Definitely no kissing going on tonight!!)

4/ Mum's incredible spinach curry, that I would travel all the way back to England to eat, and which would win hands down over any indian restaurant in Moscow!!

5/ That's enough food for now, time to get dinner on

investor
11-11-2003, 11:37
Machine, don't even know..should I forgive you or no.......... I thought that you liked my pink dress...............

Hawk
11-11-2003, 11:40
Lobster themidor would really be a welcome treat today

machine
11-11-2003, 11:42
Originally posted by investor
Machine, don't even know..should I forgive you or no.......... I thought that you liked my pink dress...............

Of course I liked it...I still like it. It was a joke, hon, please forgive me, I'm begging you. Look at my avatar - it's just a doll...what can one expect from a dumb doll? Forgive me and I'll do anything for you;)

DPG
11-11-2003, 11:44
Oppps! was so hungry I forgot to post my own!!

A dozen oysters on ice with lemon, chilli vinegar and fresh brown bread and some chablis.

A medium rare aberdeen angus rib eye with homemade chips and a decent green salad.

My grandmother's steamed syrup pudding with fresh custard.

Look, now you've all gone and got me hungry again!!!! (although I suppose it is my fault for starting the thread!!).

Oh yeah, and English fish and chips if I was still peckish!!

investor
11-11-2003, 11:45
Anything.......hm-mmmmm.sounds interesting.............feels like having some flowers.

machine
11-11-2003, 11:48
Damn, how come I can't post an image here?

Dear, you'll have to click here to get flowers:



http://www.proflowers.com/continuityprogram/roses-red_tn.jpg

wwwoland
11-11-2003, 12:00
Why is it that the Brits (with probably one of the most "challenged" culinary histories) constantly seem to be posting with cravings for fish, chips, custards, and meat pies? I thought you'd all like being AWAY from such gastronomical disasters. :p But wait... there's always Haggis! Or that's Scottish, I guess.

Loki
11-11-2003, 12:09
Chicken Tika Masala, boiled rice and a keema naan would do me right around now.

On another point I think it strange that an American should question English cuisine, considering North Americas contribution to cullinary excellence.

lochnessmonster
11-11-2003, 12:10
Friday nights, no one wants to cook, everyone around the TV. Dad pops out to the pub and comes back with fish and chips. I suppose if you haven't grown up with, then you won't get excited about it.

As for culinary heritage, well, I won't pretend to suggest that we have a rich heritage, but right now, the London restaurant scene is among the bestEST in the world (you can even get Michelin rated fish and chips - yippee!!)

allice
11-11-2003, 12:16
Originally posted by wwwoland
Why is it that the Brits (with probably one of the most "challenged" culinary histories) constantly seem to be posting with cravings for fish, chips, custards, and meat pies? I thought you'd all like being AWAY from such gastronomical disasters. :p But wait... there's always Haggis! Or that's Scottish, I guess.

HUGGIS!!! :eek: YAKKKK! :D :D :p

wwwoland
11-11-2003, 12:48
Lochness -- agree that London has one of the best restaurant scenes in the world. Great place! But admitedly, not many of those fantastic establishments are serving up sheppards pie and chips with vinegar.

Loki -- touche on the contributions of American cuisine. But I'm certainly not one to recommend "American food" as a culinary experience worthy of anything other than greasy cheeseburgers and french fries. What the Americans do do well, however, is to borrow (steal?) from other countries and cultures. Sometimes the end result is pretty good.

geofizz56
11-11-2003, 12:48
I think the US's biggest contribution to cuisine (outside of Krispy Kremes!) is providing a friendly home for everyone else's. Within a few blocks of home I can get empanadas (Chilean -AND- Colombian), Indian curry, Mexican enchiladas, Salvadoran pupusas, shawarma, barbecued anything (including goat), Cajun crawfish, French pastries from a Vietnamese bakery, and if I look hard enough, a cheeseburger.

Of course, then you have the other side of North America - Canada, with its ketchup-flavored potato chips and Newfoundland Screech. At least the ale is good. Cod cakes aren't bad, either.

Intourist
11-11-2003, 13:02
I've said it before and I'll say it again. This city will never be complete until you can get Doritos here.

I'd kill for a bag of Ranch flavored Doritos right now.

DJ Biscuit
11-11-2003, 13:12
Chicken Korma, shepherds pie, marmite, houmous, decent onion bahjiis, carrot and orange soup, chicken breast stuffed with banana, english cold milk.....

wwwoland
11-11-2003, 13:20
What is "marmite"??? :confused: :confused: :eek:

machine
11-11-2003, 13:23
Originally posted by Intourist
I've said it before and I'll say it again. This city will never be complete until you can get Doritos here.

I'd kill for a bag of Ranch flavored Doritos right now.

http://lists.irex.ru/pipermail/expat/2002-April/006976.html

Intourist
11-11-2003, 13:29
I appreciate the effort, Machine, however anything called "Doritos-like" is a nothing but a cheap imitation of the original. Sigh.

There is no substitute.

Ramstore actually had a fluke batch imported from Turkey last year in the small "personal serving" size bags. For an all too short while, I was near fully content, but alas, they came as quickly as they went.

machine
11-11-2003, 13:32
Is there salsa in Moscow? In movie theaters they sell Doritos-like chips but they come only with Nacho- like cheese.

Loki
11-11-2003, 13:37
Marmite is a yeast extract spread that us Brits love putting on toast or in sandwiches. Also known as Vegimite in Australia.

Intourist
11-11-2003, 14:04
And made famous by "Men at Work" in their song, "Down Under"

"He just smiled and gave me a vegimite sandwhich"

An interesting lyric since most Americans had no idea what vegimite was. Still incorrectly sung by many an American 80's child to this day. :)

DJ Biscuit
11-11-2003, 14:08
Originally posted by machine
Is there salsa in Moscow? In movie theaters they sell Doritos-like chips but they come only with Nacho- like cheese.

I think they have salsa lessons in Karma Bar on Monday's. :D :)

wwwoland
11-11-2003, 14:54
Originally posted by Loki
Marmite is a yeast extract spread that us Brits love putting on toast or in sandwiches. Also known as Vegimite in Australia.

A yeast extract spread? MMmmmmm.... Sounds absolutely delicious! :p Actually I've never tried it, so I'll shut up now. :eek:

DJ Biscuit
11-11-2003, 16:03
:D

Try it on toast with houmous on top, combo-tastic.

DPG
11-11-2003, 16:57
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
:D

Try it on toast with houmous on top, combo-tastic.

Sounds bloody magical DJ!!

Just got to make some more Houmos!!

Marmite - without question the aristocrat of the spread world...americans don't knock it until you've tried it!!

geofizz56
11-11-2003, 17:32
Does anyone wonder WHY you can't find marmite/vegemite outside British enclaves? It's the same reason you don't see lutefisk unless there's a Norwegian nearby. No one who hasn't grown up with it can stand it! (Yes, I've tried it - didn't gag, but won't be trying it again.)

Intourist
11-11-2003, 17:55
Originally posted by geofizz56
It's the same reason you don't see lutefisk unless there's a Norwegian nearby.

Or Doritos if there are no Americans around.

DPG
11-11-2003, 18:03
Originally posted by Intourist
Or Doritos if there are no Americans around.

I absolutely ADORE Doritos and I'm not american!...but now you have got me wondering whether the ones I used to get in the UK are the same as what you would call Doritos, because I remember them, whilst being very nice, no different from any other tortilla type chip...perhaps the ones 'over the pond' are different??!!

Fa-Q!
11-11-2003, 18:10
I'd give my left nut for some hog jowls, chitlin's and collard greens!

Kshisya
11-11-2003, 18:13
Originally posted by Fa-Q!
I'd give my left nut for some hog jowls, chitlin's and collard greens!

hmmmmmmmmmmmm :rolleyes: if you give ya left nut for it...you voice will change and wont be good for rapping....:rolleyes: better sacrifice something else :p

MWAH hope now your stomach can enjoy ANY food :) XXX actually you could give Our Royal H a call ;)

poka

Intourist
11-11-2003, 18:33
Originally posted by DPG
I absolutely ADORE Doritos and I'm not american!...but now you have got me wondering whether the ones I used to get in the UK are the same as what you would call Doritos, because I remember them, whilst being very nice, no different from any other tortilla type chip...perhaps the ones 'over the pond' are different??!!

No different from any other tortilla chip !? Blasphemy, DPG.

Actually, there are other corn-based chips that I find suitable for munching that you can get here, but I actually haven't found any of them to be *very* similar to Doritos, by any stretch of the imagination. The crunch is all wrong, not nearly enough MSG, and totally different flavors.

I actually haven't been able to find them in travels abroad to Brussels, Paris and Helsinki. I scored in Amsterdam, but only in a tiny Indian-run snack-shop and not in major supermarkets.

I feel like such a bad-tourist American just telling about this, but what can I say ? Doritos are my weakness. Sigh.

DJ Biscuit
11-11-2003, 18:37
Marmite, well it's the same then that you can't find Selodka pod shubi outside Russia, or Tan Iaran outside former USSR.

I hope hogs jowels are not what they sound like! :D

wwwoland
11-11-2003, 18:51
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
I hope hogs jowels are not what they sound like! :D

Maybe... but I'm sure they probably go well with Grits! Any southerner out there want to define what hog jowels are? BTW... speaking of grits, where the f---k is Allice? :)

DPG
11-11-2003, 20:58
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
well it's the same then that you can't find Selodka pod shubi outside Russia

Thank god for that eh!!!


Intourist: I apologise for my blatent tortilla blasphemy!! I agree that there is that charmingly understated MSG twang to a pack of doritos!!!;);)

I'm going to London in a couple of weeks - buy me a pint before then and I'll bring you back a couple of bags (or should that be a couple of boxes!!!???).

Stella
12-11-2003, 07:30
Hog jowls, are well, the jowls of hogs. I beleive that is the cheek portion. Chitlins, or "chitterlings" as you Brits would probably say, are the fried intestines, and collard greens, oh, collard greens with cornbread, ...my mother's cornbread, and sweet ice-tea, no make that a COLD beer, with boiled shrimp, and Parker's barbecue. I don't have to explain to ya'll what grits are, now do I?

geofizz56
12-11-2003, 08:03
Not to me. I once had to rush an emergency supply of grits to two desperate southerners stuck in Chile. My husband smooshes them into fried eggs. Icky.

Stella
12-11-2003, 08:34
Grits should never be adulterated. Only pure grits are truly worthy of being called "Southern." Sometimes, when I'm desperate, I cook manna kasha without sugar and milk, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and butter, and PRETEND. But they make a great euphemism, don't they!

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 09:04
Aw hell, Stella, now whydja hafta go and make a southern boy drool like this???? Hog jowls, collard greens with a ton of tabasco, cornbread, and best of all - mudbugs boiled in Zatarains with taters, corn, and onions in the pot.....and a case of Abita beer!!!

By the way, if you like raw oysters as much as I do, then hie thee to Tinkoff restaurant. I just went to the one in St Pete over the weekend, and they have 'em there. They're expensive as hell (139 rubes each), but they're delish! They even serve 'em with Tabasco, but I couldn't get the gal to float me any horseradish that wasn't mixed with sour cream.

As for all this debate about American vs Brit food...fuggedaboutit, we all have something good to contribute. I personally adore fish&chips (the TRUE Brit version!), and given my love of various and sundry other "animal guts" dishes, am actually eager to try haggis (did I spell that right?). And before you knock good ol' American cheeseburgers as being nothing but greasy fast food, hike on over to my dom next time I make 'em from steak I ground myself (well okay, my wife did that part) - sublime is the word.

Stella
12-11-2003, 09:42
Hey, soul food john, did you know that crawfish are native in these parts too? In season, of course. They're called "rockee."
Pinch the tails and suck the heads! Oh, my, did I say that? Been here WAY too long!

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 10:04
Originally posted by Stella
Hey, soul food john, did you know that crawfish are native in these parts too? In season, of course. They're called "rockee."
Pinch the tails and suck the heads! Oh, my, did I say that? Been here WAY too long!

Yeah, they have 'em at Tinkoff as well, but my eyes were all aglaze at the thought of those lovely, naked oysters begging me to....gee, I think my little food jones is getting a bit sex-shul!

BTW - are you from Louisiana too? Geaux Tigers, baby!

Stella
12-11-2003, 10:11
No, so fine john, I'm a Tar Heel baby, but one of my most favorite memories is Jazz Fest, New Orleans, oh,I forget what year!

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 11:52
sorry, lost interest in this thread after I read about 'mudbugs'

And people have the nerve to complain about weird British food?

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 12:01
Originally posted by lochnessmonster
sorry, lost interest in this thread after I read about 'mudbugs'

And people have the nerve to complain about weird British food?
Sorry, guess I was giving more credit for folks being open-minded. Mudbugs are what we Loozyanyans call what you Brits and other non-southerners (US) laughingly-to-us call "crayfish."

...and I did express my sincere interest in trying haggis, so gimme' a break!

DPG
12-11-2003, 12:04
To rip off my mate lochnessmonster's signiture regarding menu translations, what are the wierdest things you've ever seen on a menu from a bad translation perspective and where did you see them??

The meeting place on tverskaya used to have the menu with the worst translations I have ever seen, touting delicacies such as:

Pelmeni from piggy-meat
One year endurance salmon in acute tabasco sauce
Shashliks from hen innards

And loads of other things that without reading the Russian menu, I simply had no idea what they were!:)

I went back to get a copy of the menu recently but they had improved the language :(

Any one else got any gems of gastronomic translation??

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 12:21
Good ones, DPG! My own, from a restaurant in Kazakstan (where they raise horses as food):

telyachi shashlik (veal shashlik)
their xlat: "brazen baby cow flesh"

Though I'm not one of those PETA weirdos, I was nearly as grossed out as Lochness was by my mudbugs! All I could picture were the big, brown eyes of my little brother's pet calf from when we were kids!

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 12:23
I once asked for the 'mountain VEGETABLE' menu at a restaurant in Korea and was given a bowl of bee larvae!

Needless to say, I suddenly lost my appetite, although I should have put my money where my mouth is and tried it.

Oh well, now I'll never know!!

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 12:25
Well, I had an image of DUNG BEETLES when I read mud bugs. Anyway, is anyone actually going to EXPLAIN what mudbugs are, and PLEASE don't tell me that's exactly what they are, because I haven't had lunch yet...

DPG
12-11-2003, 12:26
Saw one in Prague about 5 years ago which was boasting:

"Italian Needles in a meaty sauce" (spaghetti bolognaise to the rest of us on planet earth!!).

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 12:38
I used to go to a place that had a sign with 'the best octopus balls in the world'

But it was in Japanese and I didn't learn how to read it for several years...

Needless to say, I didn't go back when I found out!

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 12:38
Originally posted by lochnessmonster
Well, I had an image of DUNG BEETLES when I read mud bugs. Anyway, is anyone actually going to EXPLAIN what mudbugs are, and PLEASE don't tell me that's exactly what they are, because I haven't had lunch yet...

From my previous reply...mudbugs are what we Loozyanyans call what you Brits and other non-southerners (US) laughingly-to-us call "crayfish."

Like Russian raki, they are a great party food. We boil them over an outdoor gas burner in a 50-gallon pot, along with whole potatoes and onions, corn-on-the-cob, and a Louisiana-unique spice called "Zatarains" (very similar to Old Bay, found in the Baltimore, Maryland area).

We cover an entire table first with plastic bags, then newspaper, and when the 'bugs are done cooking, dump the entire kettle (they're actually in a huge strainer) onto the table, and everybody stands around the table and eats. You eat 'em by first breaking the tail off, then you suck the head because the spices have gathered there in the fatty deposit, then you pinch the tail to peel off the shell and expose the meat inside....hence the expression "pinch me, peel me, eat me" or "pinch the tail and suck the head."

Still grossed out?

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 12:45
Oh yeah, THOSE really well-known expressions, I hear them ALL THE TIME!

no, I've decided I REALLY didn't want to know that after all.

bon appetit

geofizz56
12-11-2003, 12:49
I used to work for an Egyptian who would host a crawfish boil every year - huge mounds of mudbugs, with potatoes and corn cooked in the same boil. Good eatin'! He must have been Cajun in another life.

But I think what is confusing people is what a "crayfish" "crawfish" "crawdad" "mudbug" looks like.

Imagine a freshwater lobster about 12 cm long. Imagine said lobster boiled by the hundreds in huge kettles with lots of cayenne pepper, paprika, and Cajuns-only-know what else. Then put on really old clothes and prepare to be covered in crawdad debris at least up to the elbows as you dig into the pile that has been dumped on the table in front of you.

As a transplanted Yankee who grew up using crayfish for bait, I never got into head-sucking, but I sure do like the tails.

Oh, and crawfish etouffe at Mulate's in Breaux Bridge! Ohhhh, I need to go home now!

lochnessmonster
12-11-2003, 13:16
" never got into head-sucking, but I sure do like the tails"

I don't mean to sound squeamish, but do you all know what all this sounds like. pretty awful...

I am going to try and clear my mind and remind myself of Bubba from forrest Gump talking about ten million types of shrimp, no bug-eyed monsters there.

DPG
12-11-2003, 13:37
I've had them here in Moscow and I must say that they are bloody good to eat especially with beer.

The only problems with them are that not being very large there isn't exactly a feast sized portion of meat on each and that (perhaps simply for my untrained hands) I found them pretty dificult to crack and extract the tail meat...they (like oysters) are things which I think taste better when someone esle does the difficult part for you!

As for 'head sucking', it's erm not something I've ever tried, not being well, erm...........;) ;)!

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 14:12
head sucking, tail pinching.....are you telling me I've introduced some folks from here-n-there to something NEW???? Way cool, I can call this day done-done-DONE!!!

Seriously, to the unexperienced, I admit that the idea of sucking the head of something that spends its life filtering mud thru its gills (hence "mudbugs") for sustenance might foment a tad bit of squeamishness. But don't knock it 'til you try it....after all (and I repeat myself), I am more than willing to try haggis!

"Mulate's in Breaux Bridge".....geo, even though I am stuffed from my very recent lunch, I owe you a tiff on the nose for making my mouth water!!! Hell, I didn't think anybody outside of LA had ever even heard of Breaux Bridge, much less Mulate's. They're actually a chain now, opened one in Baton Rouge and of course N'awlins.

Having said all this and before, I humbly invite each and every one of you to visit my home state, Louisiana, and sample what I am sure you will consider some of the finest, tastiest, most inventive cuisine you will ever be lucky enough to experience.

...but, чисто, I still love my vobla and beer!!!

kniga
12-11-2003, 14:27
wwwoland,

"Loki -- touche on the contributions of American cuisine. But I'm certainly not one to recommend "American food" as a culinary experience worthy of anything other than greasy cheeseburgers and french fries. What the Americans do do well, however, is to borrow (steal?) from other countries and cultures. Sometimes the end result is pretty good."

Are you really an American? You must be a Damn Yankee because American home cooking is as good as it gets anywhere in the world. If you ever sat down to a meal prepared by the best scratch cook in the South, my wife, and sank a tooth into her country ham, white acre peas with snaps, hand mashed potatoes whipped with milk and butter, Miss Pitty Pat's sweet cornbread muffins, scratch biscuits and sweet iced tea finished off with peach cobbler with golden brown crust you'd think you'd died and gone to heaven!

If all you've ever done is eat in restaurants you haven't lived, just existed...

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 14:34
Awright, forum - first ya' throw cornbread and collards in my face, THEN you remind me of Mulate's....and now YOU, kniga, have to utter the should-be-hallowed words "country ham" and "sweet iced tea" and (my heart shudders in ecstacy) "peach cobbler" to sink the proverbial stake into my culinary heart.

Dammittaheyall, somebody's havin' me over fer dinner or my name ain't Alloysius Damberdombria Allencrump! Which it really ain't, of course, but this soul food teasin' has just got ta' stop!!!

DJ Biscuit
12-11-2003, 14:35
Regarding Crawfish/Crayfish, I think you will find that these fresh water lobster are easily available here in Moscow. The Russians call them Raki, and you can buy live ones at most markets.

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 14:44
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
Regarding Crawfish/Crayfish, I think you will find that these fresh water lobster are easily available here in Moscow. The Russians call them Raki, and you can buy live ones at most markets.
Yeah, I've seen them all over the place and even had them a few times. Taste great, but they ARE considerably different from Lousiana crawdads...LA version is a darker red color after they're cooked, the outer shell on the Russian rak version is smoother and considerably harder to crack. Like the LA version, they go great with beer, and I was quite happy to find such a similar cultural item here.

Since we're on what seems to be a bit of an American South Culinary Cabal slant here, anybody else big fans of oysters on the half-shell? I heard of some place in Moscow (forgot the name) that has them from all over, to include the US Appalachicola variety, which is found in the Gulf of Mexico near the Florida-Alabama shores and is quite delicious.

kniga
12-11-2003, 15:05
sfjohns67,

Sorry 'bout that, neighbor. There must be more than just a couple of us Johnny Rebs here in Moscow, so when my wife comes over for a visit, I'll see if I can talk her into cookin' up a Sunday dinner that would do a Methodist church potluck supper proud and invite over however many true Sons of the South that can fit into my tiny apartment.

geofizz56
12-11-2003, 15:41
My only claims to the South are a husband from New Iberia and living in Texas for 20+ years (I know, it's not the REAL South!).

I was introduced to Mulate's on a Saturday night - what a bizarre, wondermous place. Can't imagine it as a chain. My son, who was about 4 or 5, got to dancing so hard he spun right into a table and nearly knocked a tooth out. He recovered nicely, though, just about the time our food showed up.

Man, those Cajuns know how to party! Accordions, fiddles, and plenty of Abita beer!

sfjohns67
12-11-2003, 17:34
Whoa, geo, are you telling me that there's another hick from Louisiana in my beloved Moscow???? :eek: :cool: It really IS a Southern Cabal!

We must to get together and to go out and to eat the slimy, raw flesh of the oyschur!!! And tell your hubby to lug along a couple cases of Tabasco with him, wouldja!?

geofizz56
12-11-2003, 18:28
Unfortunately, hubby has his own business so stayed behind in Houston. I'll be home at Christmas though and would be glad to bring back some Tabasco or Zatarain seasonings.

Shall we branch off from mudbugs and extol the merits of beignets?

wwwoland
13-11-2003, 09:28
Originally posted by kniga
wwwoland,

"Loki -- touche on the contributions of American cuisine. But I'm certainly not one to recommend "American food" as a culinary experience worthy of anything other than greasy cheeseburgers and french fries. What the Americans do do well, however, is to borrow (steal?) from other countries and cultures. Sometimes the end result is pretty good."

Are you really an American? You must be a Damn Yankee because American home cooking is as good as it gets anywhere in the world. If you ever sat down to a meal prepared by the best scratch cook in the South, my wife, and sank a tooth into her country ham, white acre peas with snaps, hand mashed potatoes whipped with milk and butter, Miss Pitty Pat's sweet cornbread muffins, scratch biscuits and sweet iced tea finished off with peach cobbler with golden brown crust you'd think you'd died and gone to heaven!

If all you've ever done is eat in restaurants you haven't lived, just existed...

Kniga -- American? Mmm.... Yankee... not really. But I've lived both up north and down south. Probably it's more what you've grown up with. As for your suggested recipie, I agree it sounds great -- the country ham (love it!), mashed potatoes w/ milk&butter, corn bread, etc. But definitely not a fan of sweet iced tea. Blech! "Would you like a little bit of tea with your sugar?"

I will admit that home cooking, no matter where (down south, Moscow, anywhere) can be some of the best in the world. Let's just say that I have an affinity for top-notch cuisine and have resorted to becoming an excellent cook myself. Quickly discovered in America (in cities outside of New York, San Fran and New Orleans) that if I wanted consistently fabulous food, I'd have to cook it myself. Sounds like your wife would agree.

Speaking of New Orleans, I will also admit that Cajun/Creole is among my top 3 world cuisines. De stuff dem Cajuns cook up is wondumus!!!!

kniga
14-11-2003, 18:18
wwwoland,

Ah, good! I was afraid you were like the incredible Liuboi and simply bought your way into haute cuisine at the best restaurants!