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davidhuckin
08-06-2011, 10:59
Good Morning,

I have been with my Russian Girlfriend for 2 years now, and on a recent vacation we got engaged... so now i need to know the ins and outs of getting married in Russia, i am UK citizen that works full time in Moscow on yearly visa's and work permit.

We have two options we are looking at other than getting married in Moscow and would like to know if they are feasible.

1) Getting married in St Pete
2) Getting married abroad and it being legal in Russia when we return

Any other tips and advice would be much appreciated

Many Thanks

David

xSnoofovich
08-06-2011, 11:13
Congrats ! :)

mattology
08-06-2011, 12:01
I would also be interested in that... however, we are planning to move away from Russia in a few months and I would not be on a Russian working contract as of August anymore. So I'm assuming it is much easier to get married in Russia than in the EU...right?

What possibilities do we have to get married on my frequent weekend trips to Russia after August? I would still be on my work visa entering the country (it is still valid until November 2012), but not get registered, as I would only stay for a few days only every time I come.

Thanks a lot,
Matt

ferns1john
08-06-2011, 14:02
Congrats :) All the best. If u have the marriage in Russia i can telll you 1 thing you will save money on apostille and translation of marriage certificate in russian everytime you have to submit the marriage certificate.

franzewich
08-06-2011, 15:16
I would also be interested in that... however, we are planning to move away from Russia in a few months and I would not be on a Russian working contract as of August anymore. So I'm assuming it is much easier to get married in Russia than in the EU...right?

What possibilities do we have to get married on my frequent weekend trips to Russia after August? I would still be on my work visa entering the country (it is still valid until November 2012), but not get registered, as I would only stay for a few days only every time I come.

Thanks a lot,
Matt

Marrying in Russia is quite easy, that would be my choice. Unless you want your wife to get German citizenship (which she probably wants). Did some research on that subject a while ago; PM me if you are interested!

But should you get married in Germany, don't do it without a notarized marriage contract! Costs some money, but do it! Don't ask - just do it! ;)

DavidB
08-06-2011, 15:51
Congratulations, David.

The FCO has a guide on the subject:
http://ukinrussia.fco.gov.uk/en/help-for-british-nationals/living-in-russia/how-register-marriage-or

In short: you can obtain a certificate of no impediment from your local registry and have it legalised (apostilled) in the UK then translated, or you can obtain it from the British Consulate.
If you live in St.petersburg, it's somewhat easier to have the certificate issued and legalised in the UK, because the one issued by the British Consulate has to be legalised in Moscow, and you have to go there in person to do that.

Remember that you can have the ceremony wherever you like. The ZAGS registry isn't the most attractive place to get married.

ilya25
08-06-2011, 21:08
I think you'd better check with your embassy to make sure that your marriage is recognized in your home country

Probably if you decide to get married in Russia you need to prove somehow that you are single

xjessie007
05-08-2011, 18:36
Probably if you decide to get married in Russia you need to prove somehow that you are single

It is not necessary, you just come to the church or to the city hall and get married, that is it.

rusmeister
05-08-2011, 19:09
My advice is to see your marriage as an unbreakable vow, rather than as a contract to be broken when the going gets rough. Share a common faith - I recommend Orthodoxy - and you'll be much more likely to have the same address with children and grandchildren all via the same woman 40 years down the road.

Planning back doors to get out in advance makes it much more likely that you WILL get out, especially if you're asking "What's in it for me?" (Not that you are, but sadly, that's the modern attitude) Marriage for life means sacrificing yourself for the sake of something bigger than two mere individuals. That's what family is.

Hans.KK
08-08-2011, 15:15
It is not necessary, you just come to the church or to the city hall and get married, that is it.Cool, that is all ? no other requriments ?

soprty
08-08-2011, 15:44
It is not necessary, you just come to the church or to the city hall and get married, that is it.

Sorry but this is far from being true.

I am a US and Italian citizen and got married (as a US citizen) in March to Russian woman. Although it is really not complicated at all and took me 4 days to get all the paperwork, there are still some things you need to get. First thing is to get a notarized translation of your passport and go to your embassy which will give you a step by step guideline on what to do. It is true regarding a certificate that states you have never been married but this is done on the spot at the embassy by means of a public notary and cost me about $50.

As I said, the whole procedure took 4 days and the total cost was about $200.

Good luck and congrats!!

AstarD
08-08-2011, 15:48
It is not necessary, you just come to the church or to the city hall and get married, that is it.
This person has been spreading ludicrous information on both sites.

xSnoofovich
08-08-2011, 15:55
This person has been spreading ludicrous information on both sites.

Off with his/her head !

mrzuzzo
08-08-2011, 16:00
It is not necessary, you just come to the church or to the city hall and get married, that is it.

Getting married in a church in Russia.... with no papers proving you are not married yet... yeah ok there bud.

And you can't get married in a city hall here either, not that I've heard of at least..

As far as I understand, ZAGS are the only ones that can officially register your marriage. Never been married (yet, unfortunately or fortunately) but if I'm wrong please correct me.

bydand
08-08-2011, 16:03
I would consider getting married in both coutries. That's what we did eventually.

The idiots here insisted my wife needed a new Russian passport if she wanted to adopt my family name, even though her US drivers licence and green card, and social security card showed her last name the same as mine. The Texas marriage certificate (with notarized translation and apostille) did not stipulate that she took my name. She could choose to or not. Also a letter from the US embassy that stated if she says her name is _____, her name is _____ . Here that (her word) wasn't good enough. I think the hag at the passport table wanted a new TV.

Edit: After reading MrZ's post; we got married in a church here and got no papers. Don't know if we could have, or not, for sure.

AndreyS
08-08-2011, 16:05
Getting married in a church in Russia.... with no papers proving you are not married yet... yeah ok there bud.

And you can't get married in a city hall here either, not that I've heard of at least..

As far as I understand, ZAGS are the only ones that can officially register your marriage. Never been married (yet, unfortunately or fortunately) but if I'm wrong please correct me.
But when in Paris, you can get married right on the Eiffel tower! True.

soprty
08-08-2011, 16:14
But when in Paris, you can get married right on the Eiffel tower! True.

Yes and you get get married as Elvis in the USA but this ain't Paris or the USA :)

AstarD
08-08-2011, 16:16
I would consider getting married in both coutries. That's what we did eventually.

The idiots here insisted my wife needed a new Russian passport if she wanted to adopt my family name, even though her US drivers licence and green card, and social security card showed her last name the same as mine. The Texas marriage certificate (with notarized translation and apostille) did not stipulate that she took my name. She could choose to or not. Also a letter from the US embassy that stated if she says her name is _____, her name is _____ . Here that (her word) wasn't good enough. I think the hag at the passport table wanted a new TV.

Edit: After reading MrZ's post; we got married in a church here and got no papers. Don't know if we could have, or not, for sure.
The Church marriage is a blessing only, really, because you have to have the civil ceremony first, which is the official marriage.

ilya25
09-08-2011, 01:24
The Church marriage is a blessing only, really, because you have to have the civil ceremony first, which is the official marriage.

Church is officially separated from the state in Russia, they cannot make any official actions (wedding etc) They can conduct only religious ceremonies that don't create any legal consequences.

Again in order not to have any problems in the future I'd suggest to make sure that marriage is recognized in both countries and probably to sign marriage agreement to avoid any collisions

davidhuckin
09-08-2011, 13:48
starting to think whats the point !!!!! too young anyway LOL

soprty
09-08-2011, 13:57
starting to think whats the point !!!!! too young anyway LOL

After this thread you will get married dammit!! :D :D

rusmeister
14-08-2011, 13:35
The Church marriage is a blessing only, really, because you have to have the civil ceremony first, which is the official marriage.
The Church marriage is not merely a blessing. It is a Sacrament, and is the substance of the real wedding. It is the official wedding which is the hollow and relatively false one, for it is conducted by and for officials - чиновники - here what is legal is precisely what is most fictional and unreal, the only particular good of is that it serves to a small degree to restrain what public opinion once thoroughly restrained - profligacy and easy divorce.

It was once the vow affirmed by society that held marriages as valid and binding - for life. The modern legal contract is altogether unable to do this. So tell me then, which marriage is the real marriage.

(This involves ultimately discussing exactly what marriage is, for as long as we assume that we all know and agree - when we don't - we will be talking not only to cross-purposes, but many will not be knowing what they are talking about.)

rusmeister
15-08-2011, 08:02
And, of course, only YOU know what you're talking about. Everyone else will be wrong. Because you speak for God. :bowdown:
Obviously (to others) this is NOT what I meant, although you may mean me to say it. (Or maybe you have just pigeon-holed me, and so think in advance that you already know everything about what I am going to say - which is more forgivable)

If everyone starts from the assumption that we know what marriage is (something one may do in a society ruled by common sense and (in our time I will add) common faith) and that no one need consider what exactly it is and how it got that way, then everyone is using a word and meaning different things by it - their own things, without any consideration of what it was to their grandparents/ancestors. That is the opposite of communication - when everyone is publicly using a word with a private meaning. The failure to consider what it has been - to see only what is NOW, TODAY, with practically no conception of the past (except some kind of fuzzy "domostroi" wife-beating picture (without similarly considering what a wife has been) - is the foundation of ignorance. If one is going to do something of this magnitude, then it really behooves him to seriously and deeply consider what it is that he is doing. I can sign a contract and enlist in the Army just because of some recruitment incentive the recruiter dangles before my face, or I can consider at length what the Army is and has been. If I do the former, I am very likely to regret a great many things about my Army servitude (I did five years in the military myself, so I can talk); if I do the latter, far less likely. I will not be shocked and surprised at being treated like a peon in a caste system with essentially no hope of changing castes, at the peeling potatoes and scrubbing floors even with an E-5 or E-6 designation and several stripes on my shoulder, and so on.

So when someone says they want to get married, I am curious as to what exactly it is that they think they are doing. And as I said before, if they have an eye to "a back-door" if "things don't work out", then they are very likely to find themselves on the other side of that back-door - that of a failed marriage.

I think that getting married is a very good thing, and people ought to do it - only we have, in popular culture, a radically wrong conception of what it is which we can hardly help absorbing through the schooling that we get and the media constantly pushing it on us; one which our ancestors would deny and condemn, and see us not as having progressed, but rather regressed.

But we can't even talk about marriage as long as people think they already know and that there is no need to define it or consider how humanity has defined it throughout history, especially in the culture that gave birth to us, the former geopolitical concept known as "Christendom".

Candia
28-08-2011, 10:08
Hi I am trying to get a new thread but have to seem to tag on another similar thread so hopefully can get some answers here.
I have been in and out of Russia for 2 yrs now on biz visas. I met a great gal 2ys ago and we planeed to get married next summer in Cyprus.
My problem is I turned down a contract for a company in the Krasnodar region and now I have been refused a visa for reentering I think as this guy was /is connected in the old KGB and son in Duma so I think some one has spiked my passport and am classed as a undesirable. I have never had a parking ticket and always left the day before my visa runs out.
My question is this if we bring our wedding forward to end of the year how do I stand entering the country with out a visa? I will have all docs notorised but to get to the OVIR office to apply for a TRP I need to be able to get in any ideas how this might be possible.
Do I need a visa to enter as the husband of a Russian Citizen? Should my intended contact the local OVIR office and ask or contact the MOFA. Thanks for any help.

yakspeare
28-08-2011, 10:29
I am from Krasnodar. Something doesn't sound right here, but I don't think it is any conspiracy. It is easy enough to come to Russia on work visas or indeed on a tourist visa....it may have been they looked at your business visa history and that you exceed the 90 day rule but I doubt they were that vigilant or you were plain unlucky. i don't think you need to overdramitise about kgb etc...i am certain that is not the case.

which visas have you tried to enter russia...if you have a girlfriend she can do private invitation....you can get a tourist visa...you can come here on a teacher's visa or indeed enrol in the university like i have and get a student's visa....many different ways to get about-you cannot enter Russia without a visa and the spouse of a Russian citizen has no right on this alone to reside in Russia. Your alternative is to bring her to you if visas to Russia seem so impossible. Good luck.

Hans.KK
28-08-2011, 10:33
I think some one has spiked my passport and am classed as a undesirable.Get a new passport, use a different photo than last time, change your name and/or addrese in your home contry, etc.

But what do it all help if someboby that dislike you find out that you are in russia, married or not ?

caroo
10-09-2011, 11:53
My UK boyfriend of 3 years and I recently got married in Moscow. I'm an American myself, so we got some raised eyebrows as we waded through the process.

First stop is your embassy. Fill out a notice of marriage and then pick up your certificate of no encumbrance (or something like that) two weeks later.

Get your passport translated into Russian and have the translation notarized. It is very (VERY) important that your name is spelled exactly the same way in the translation and on the certificate from the embassy.

Then you take that certificate to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to get it legalized. Note that you have to go yourself. No one can take it in for you, not even your fiance.

Once you've got that back (about a week), you head to ZAGS to turn in your paperwork and set a date.

Congratulations!