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jeyla
10-04-2011, 18:37
hello, i have worked with many local private schools and know quite a few teachers. my question is whether or not any of you agree that working in moscow as a teacher presents unique challenges.

i have had so many teachers tell me how difficult they find it here as opposed to anywhere else in the world! that the children are often more spoiled, lack any structure or boundaries and are far more challenging than in other schools and communities in other countries...

has this been your experience as well? i am just interested in getting as many opinions on this as possible.

as a family psychologist what i often find with russian families (and not so much with the expat ones) is that people don't actually want to do the work. they are happy to talk to you, to listen (but not necessarily to hear you) and then they will turn around and do whatever they want anyway, even if the detrimental developmental consequences of their choices are painfully obvious... i have also noticed that violent and vulgar behavior is more socially accepted, has that been true for anyone else?

thank you!

nyinrussia
06-05-2011, 13:33
Hi as a teacher and a mom I can tell you that bullying is encouraged more here than the states and at a very young age.

I have only taught privately so I have not had some of the challenges private school teachers have shown... However to be fair in the states I had parents that just do what they want...

As a mom I had that challenge with my husband's parents and sometime nannies. My husband is Russian I am American,our 4 kids are both. The difference between the nanny and my inlaws is that if I ask my inlaws to do something they ultimately will do the opposite. sorry I got a little off your topic question.

The answer is Unfortunately yes, yes and yes!

quincy
06-05-2011, 13:52
that the children are often more spoiled, lack any structure or boundaries and are far more challenging than in other schools and communities in other countries...

has this been your experience as well? i am just interested in getting as many opinions on this as possible.

as a family psychologist what i often find with russian families (and not so much with the expat ones) is that people don't actually want to do the work. !

those who can afford private lessons for their children would come from better off backgrounds

children from middle and upper class families tend to be spoiled all over the world

MickeyTong
08-05-2011, 18:37
those who can afford private lessons for their children would come from better off backgrounds

children from middle and upper class families tend to be spoiled all over the world

It's not only the kids from middle and upper class families who are unruly. There is an astronomical rate of burn out among teachers in the UK's publicly funded education system.

" Half of all teachers have thought about quitting because of stress. Lack of respect from pupils, heavy workload, and dealing with 'pushy parents' are all blamed, according to a YouGov survey in 2007.

Research by the Teacher Support Network in 2007 found that 71 per cent of Scottish teachers felt their job was ruining their health, with stress, exhaustion, mood swings and poor sleep patterns common.

One in three teachers has turned to alcohol, drugs, smoking and binge-eating because of pressures at work. Some have had suicidal thoughts, according to a study carried in Nottingham last year.

The number of teachers retiring early has doubled in recent years......Evidence suggested stress, poor pupil behaviour and repeated government initiatives prompted their decision.

In 2004 it was estimated that teachers took more than 200,000 days off due to job-related stress, anxiety or depression."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2008/aug/31/teaching.teachersworkload

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lancashire-12987266
"...pupils' behaviour includes challenging teachers to fights, pushing and shoving staff, pupils making malicious allegations, constant swearing, and filming lessons on mobiles and threatening to post them online."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/8146844/Serious-assaults-on-teachers-hit-six-year-high.html
"A survey earlier this year by the Association of Teachers and Lecturers found almost four in 10 staff had to deal with physical aggression from pupils in the last 12 months."

http://teachersupport.info/news/in-the-press/Behaviour-in-class-is-deteriorating.php

MickeyTong
08-05-2011, 18:40
as a family psychologist what i often find with russian families (and not so much with the expat ones) is that people don't actually want to do the work. they are happy to talk to you, to listen (but not necessarily to hear you) and then they will turn around and do whatever they want anyway, even if the detrimental developmental consequences of their choices are painfully obvious...


I hear what you are saying, Jeyla...... :7525: