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ezik
20-07-2007, 20:01
The US Embassy in Moscow has a very clear summary on visas and residence permits. :rules: Moreover, this seems to be quite generally applicable for US, UK and EU citizens.

Russian Visas (http://moscow.usembassy.gov/consular/acs.php?record_id=acsrusvisas#VisaRegistration)

I will ask them to see if I can get permission of them to publish the full text here.

svelt
24-07-2007, 19:55
thanks for the info... very valuable although i am a UK passport holder. i own my property in moscow and was wondering about the specific procedure to register myself.
naturally as i have the sveditilnost ( that i cant spell), with my name on it, i can show proof of property ownership but this being russia i doubt it stops there. i guess they will want a letter from myself allowing myself to stay in my own property and further that they will want this with passport details in russian. ok so far. what i dont know and what i ask is how far they will take it. are they going to want a notarised translated version of the passport (again sigh). i am sure the procedure is relateively simple but like the matrushka its the hassle of peeling away the layers to find the '''whole''' truth. please advise if you can..
thanks
andy

ezik
27-07-2007, 22:55
If you are the sole owner, I suppose you have to declare that you allow yourself to live in your own place. Co-owning with a Russian is actually easier, as the other can act like the one allowing you. I'm in the latter situation.

They may request you to show proof of payment of service costs to your local DEZ. So pick these up at DEZ.

Never seen hassle over translated passport pages at the OVIR, not needed as everything they need to know is already in your visa or permit.

Should indeed be quite simple.

NOTE: extra views and comments on this tread are very welcome. It may be a sticky thread, but certainly ain't a closed one.

SalTheReturn
27-07-2007, 23:16
NOTE: extra views and comments on this tread are very welcome. It may be a sticky thread, but certainly ain't a closed one.[/QUOTE]

yeah but make sure pls they do not get lost

why do u need to ask permission to the us embassy to copy and paste?:drink:

ezik
29-07-2007, 22:39
why do u need to ask permission to the us embassy to copy and paste?:drink:

Not sure, haven't read their disclaimers. Just don't want this site to be sued for copying info. Still need to ask them, though.

svelt
02-08-2007, 00:00
to continue. i have seen somewhere ''on this site i believe'' a typical landlords letter for copying. where is it????? any ideas.

and masochist i may be but i want to go the residency route. it cant be as much hassle as the visa stuff. the u.s. embassy stuff was helpful on this matter.
ezik its time you compiled all this stuff into a bestseller.

ezik
24-08-2007, 20:53
to continue. i have seen somewhere ''on this site i believe'' a typical landlords letter for copying. where is it????? any ideas.

and masochist i may be but i want to go the residency route. it cant be as much hassle as the visa stuff. the u.s. embassy stuff was helpful on this matter.
ezik its time you compiled all this stuff into a bestseller.

Svelt, we ARE compiling this into a "best-seller". All this information will soon become available in a very structured and accessible way.

KendraBP
08-11-2007, 21:05
Because it's been a while since someone posted on this thread, I thought I might add that recently Russia has been changing some of the rules about Visas. I recommend contacting your respective embassies' websites (or the embassies themselves) to see if things have changed for you.

Bels
08-11-2007, 22:08
Because it's been a while since someone posted on this thread, I thought I might add that recently Russia has been changing some of the rules about Visas. I recommend contacting your respective embassies' websites (or the embassies themselves) to see if things have changed for you.

I did, they appear to be the slowest. Nothing has changed they so.

Are we getting excited over nothing ???

However, Well done America. You have put great British Embassy to shame.

Bels
08-11-2007, 22:25
Here's my address again for the British Embassy in Russia.

What do you think about the relevence of service for Brits living in Russia, apart from permission to marry etc.

What kind of information do they provide in relevance to the partnership of Britain and Russia.

What do yoou think. I think Britain is great but this site doesn't show the greatness of our partnership with Russia nor the needs of those Brits who live in this country. What do you think of this fantastic up-dated web-site?

Proper Bostonian
09-11-2007, 08:32
Yes, the US Embassy has good info about visas, HOWEVER, it does NOT address the new regulations!

Bels
09-11-2007, 10:11
Because it's been a while since someone posted on this thread, I thought I might add that recently Russia has been changing some of the rules about Visas. I recommend contacting your respective embassies' websites (or the embassies themselves) to see if things have changed for you.

Click below for the Russian Embassy in London.
šон�ƒлŒ�кий о‚дел Ÿо�олŒ�‚ва *о��ии в ›ондоне (http://www.rusemblon.org)

No changes in London apparently.

thva
09-11-2007, 10:57
Click below for the Russian Embassy in London.
Кон�уль�кий отдел По�оль�тва *о��ии в Лондоне (http://www.rusemblon.org)

No changes in London apparently.

my guess is that they simply haven't updated their website - on one of these 2 sites there is a thread where someone describes both Australians and US citizens getting refused visas in London, told to go back to their home countries -

the irony about the problems Americans have had at the embassy in the UK is that the US consular advice about this says specifically that the UK is the only country near to Russia which allows US citizens to remain for longer than 90 days - thus according to the letter of the Russian law, we should be allowed to get visas in the UK specifically. However, as of course with all things Russian, there is a contrast between the theory of what is allowed and the reality (sometimes more and sometimes less ...)!

Bels
09-11-2007, 11:39
my guess is that they simply haven't updated their website - on one of these 2 sites there is a thread where someone describes both Australians and US citizens getting refused visas in London, told to go back to their home countries -

the irony about the problems Americans have had at the embassy in the UK is that the US consular advice about this says specifically that the UK is the only country near to Russia which allows US citizens to remain for longer than 90 days - thus according to the letter of the Russian law, we should be allowed to get visas in the UK specifically. However, as of course with all things Russian, there is a contrast between the theory of what is allowed and the reality (sometimes more and sometimes less ...)!

OK, perhaps out of date, or may be not. There was a special separate application form for Americans on this site. Is it still there?

There has been some recent posts of Brits making enquiries to the London Embassy and them stating no changes.

Lola7
29-11-2007, 22:33
According to my company (I am Canadian and on a business Visa with permission to work in Russia) When I go home for the holidays I need to re-apply for single entry work permit, take the HIV test again, and it all seems to be a bit muddled and confusing. Can't seem to get a straight answer from anyone here or the Russian embassy in Toronto. Anyone finding that if they leave they can't come back as easily as they thought?

A bit stressful......:sick:

Bels
30-11-2007, 12:02
According to my company (I am Canadian and on a business Visa with permission to work in Russia) When I go home for the holidays I need to re-apply for single entry work permit, take the HIV test again, and it all seems to be a bit muddled and confusing. Can't seem to get a straight answer from anyone here or the Russian embassy in Toronto. Anyone finding that if they leave they can't come back as easily as they thought?

A bit stressful......:sick:

Have you tried e-mailing, or phoning The russian Embassy where apply to get your visa. And what does their web-site.

I dealt with my London Russian Embassy direct, and they were always helpful.
Some of you I think use an agent, and often they don't know the latest of what's going on, and because of this I think some of you don't have any contact with the Russia Embassy what so ever. Therefore some of you might know your own local Russian Embassy.

It might be a good idea for someone to set up a Russian Embassy directory showing their web address plus other useful contacts in getting your visa.

It also might also be a good idea to set up addresses of all the OVIRS in Russia, where you may apply and get info on your application.

Zago
18-03-2008, 10:44
Dear Svelt & Ezik

The problem is being an owner is that you cannot register yourself in your apartment. This is the russian rule. If you want to register yourself, then first you have to register any russian national (your friends) in your apt and then he/she will register you in your apt. In this case, your friend becomes an owner and can ask a share in your investment.No other way. Ownership does not gives you permission to register yourself. he best way is to ask one of your friends to fill the "Uvedomleniye" and send by post on behalf of you.

kapione
02-04-2008, 17:07
good work this IS useful information !

Bels
02-04-2008, 18:03
Dear Svelt & Ezik

The problem is being an owner is that you cannot register yourself in your apartment. This is the russian rule. If you want to register yourself, then first you have to register any russian national (your friends) in your apt and then he/she will register you in your apt. In this case, your friend becomes an owner and can ask a share in your investment.No other way. Ownership does not gives you permission to register yourself. he best way is to ask one of your friends to fill the "Uvedomleniye" and send by post on behalf of you.

But is this a common situation? The majority of the successful applicants will be married to a Russian, as it's now almost impossible otherwise. Therefore we will assume at at least the Russian partner is resident somewhere, or has a share in the property.

The only other way is if your renting, which might be a problem to pursuade to pursuade the landlord to accompany you and sighn some papers with you.

svelt
05-04-2008, 19:36
i am, and have been many times, registered at my own apartment. no other person is registered there. i do have to take a russian gf to chistie prudi post office to do the registration along with copy sveditilnost and the regular visa, imig card and passport copies. i have never had any problem going this route and in the past i have used other russians to supply a passport. any bomzhe from kazanski can be your ''passport''. hey dont care as long as its russian.

kapione
05-04-2008, 20:02
why does this registration still happen???? Do people still love the red tape ?or is it job security ?

momof4
10-04-2008, 10:31
As a fellow foreigner who owns a flat here...

I've registered myself (and family) many times. However, my friend who is in the same situation was just called by the FMS (last week)and told that he cannot register himself following some sort of ruling in Jan, 2007. I was told by a couple of Post Offices that they would not take my registration forms for this reason. I thought they were just reluctant to handle my case. As posted above, an RF national needs to be registered first, given a power of attourney (doverenost) then they can in turn register you. Not looking forward to paying the 1000rbls + to my visa agency for registering through them...
The joy and pain of ownership

Emkai
30-08-2008, 20:07
Seems the link at the top of this topic doesn't work any more.
Here is the new one:

Russian Visas (http://moscow.usembassy.gov/russian-visas.html)

Bels
30-08-2008, 20:29
Yes and worth posting. It states American but applies to all westerners in Europe. Just a few flaws, and that is on temporary residency, you do not have the automatic right to work, even within a limited area. You need to find an employer who has the right to invite and employers.

Worth pasting, so I have done so.

Russian Visas
The Russian government maintains a restrictive and complicated visa regime for foreigners who visit, transit, or reside in the Russian Federation. A U.S. citizen who does not comply with Russian visa laws can be subject to arrest, fines, and/or deportation. Russian authorities will not allow a U.S. citizen traveler with an expired visa to depart the country, effectively stranding the person for up to 20 days, until local authorities grant an exit visa.

The Government of Russia does not recognize the standing of the U.S. diplomatic mission to intervene in visa matters, including situations in which an American is stranded because of an expired visa. U.S. citizens should also be aware that Russian immigration and visa laws change regularly, and the implementation of new regulations has not always been transparent or predictable.

The Russian visa system includes a number of provisions that may be unfamiliar to Americans, including:

Sponsorship
Entry Visas
Limitations on Length of Stay
Exit Visas
Migration Cards
Visa Registration
Transit Visas
Restricted Areas
Dual citizens who also carry Russian passports face additional complicated regulations. Dual citizen minors who travel on their Russian passports also face special problems. International cruise ship passengers do not need visas if they remain with authorized tour groups at all times while ashore.

Sponsorship: Under Russian law, every foreign traveler must have a Russian-based sponsor, which could be a hotel, tour company, relative, employer, university, etc. Even if a visa was obtained through a travel agency in the United States, there is always a Russian legal entity whose name is indicated on the visa and who is considered to be the legal sponsor. Russian law requires that the sponsor must apply on the traveler's behalf for replacement, extension, or changes to a Russian visa. U.S. citizens are strongly advised to ensure that they have contact information for the visa sponsor prior to arrival in Russia, as the sponsor's assistance will be essential to resolve any visa problems. Back to Top

Entry Visas: To enter Russia for any purpose, a U.S. citizen must possess a valid U.S. passport and a bona fide visa issued by a Russian Embassy or Consulate. It is impossible to obtain an entry visa upon arrival, so travelers must apply for their visas well in advance. U.S. citizens who apply for Russian visas in third countries where they do not have permission to stay more than 90 days may face considerable delays in visa processing. Travelers who arrive in Russia without an entry visa will not be permitted to enter the country, and face immediate return to the point of embarkation at their own expense.

A Russian entry/exit visa has two dates written in the European style (day/month/year) as opposed to the American style (month/day/year). The first date indicates the earliest day a traveler may enter Russia; the second date indicates the date by which a traveler must leave Russia. A Russian visa is only valid for those exact dates and cannot be extended after the traveler has arrived in the country, except in the case of a medical emergency.

Russian tourist visas are often granted only for the specific dates mentioned in the invitation letter provided by the sponsor. U.S. citizens sometimes receive visas valid for periods as short as four days. Even if the visa is misdated through error of a Russian Embassy or Consulate, the traveler will still not be allowed into Russia before the visa start date or be allowed to leave after the visa expiration date. Any mistakes in visa dates must be corrected before the traveler enters Russia. It is helpful to have someone who reads Russian check the visa before departing the United States. Travelers should ensure that their visas reflect intended activities in Russia (e.g., tourism, study, business, etc.).

U.S. citizens who are denied visas may seek a clarification from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 32/34 Smolenskaya-Sennaya Pl., Moscow, Russia, 119200, e-mail ministry@mid.ru. The U.S. Embassy and the Consulates General, however, cannot advocate on behalf of private U.S. citizens who have been refused visas or denied entry into Russia.

Limitations on Length of Stay: In October 2007, the Russian government made significant changes to its rules regarding the length of stay permitted to most foreign visitors. For any visa issued on or after October 18, 2007, unless that visa specifically authorizes employment or study, a foreigner may stay in Russia only 90 days in any 180-day period. This applies to business, tourist, humanitarian and cultural visas, among other categories. Back to Top

Exit Visas: A valid visa is necessary to depart Russia. Travelers who overstay their visa's validity, even for one day, will be prevented from leaving until their sponsor intervenes and requests a visa extension on their behalf. Russian authorities may take up to 20 calendar days to authorize an exit visa, during which time the traveler will be stranded in Russia at his or her own expense. The ability of the Embassy or Consulates General to intervene in these situations is extremely limited.

Travelers with expired visas should also be aware that they may have difficulty checking into a hotel, hostel, or other lodging establishment. There are no adequate public shelters or safe havens in Russia and neither the U.S. Embassy nor the Consulates General have means to accommodate such stranded travelers.

Visitors who lose their U.S. passports and Russian visas to accident or theft must immediately replace their passports at the U.S. Embassy or one of the Consulates General. The traveler must then enlist the visa sponsor to obtain a new visa in order to depart the country. As noted above, the U.S. Embassy and Consulates General are not able to intercede in cases in which visas must be replaced. It is helpful to make a photocopy of your visa in the event of loss, but a copy is not sufficient to permit departure.

Travelers who are departing Russia by train should be aware that if they board a train on the last day of a visa's validity, Russian immigration officials may consider the visa to have expired if the train crosses the international border after midnight on the day of expiry. The Embassy and Consulates General are aware of cases in which travelers have been detained at border crossings, unable to leave Russia, because their visas were expired by a matter of hours or minutes.

Visas for students and English teachers sometimes allow only one entry. In these cases, the sponsoring school is responsible for registering the visa and migration card and obtaining an exit visa. Obtaining an exit visa can take up to twenty days so students and teachers need to plan accordingly. Please see the section below regarding Teaching in Russia. Back to Top

Migration Cards: All foreigners entering Russia must fill out a two-part migration card upon arrival. The traveler deposits one part of the card with immigration authorities at the port of entry, and keeps the other part for the duration of his or her stay. Upon departure, the traveler must submit his or her card to immigration authorities. Foreign visitors to Russia are normally required to present their migration cards in order to register at hotels.

Migration cards, in theory, are available at all ports of entry from Russian immigration officials (Border Guards). The cards are generally distributed to passengers on incoming flights and left in literature racks at arrival points. Officials at borders and airports usually do not point out these cards to travelers; it is up to the individual travelers to find them and fill them out.

Replacing a lost or stolen migration card is extremely difficult. While authorities will not prevent foreigners from leaving the country if they cannot present their migration cards, travelers could experience problems when trying to re-enter Russia at a future date.

Although Russia and Belarus use the same migration card, travelers should be aware that each country maintains its own visa regime. U.S. citizens wishing to travel to both nations must apply for two separate visas. A traveler entering Russia directly from Belarus is not required to obtain a new migration card, but at his or her option may do so if blank ones are available at the time of entry. Back to Top

Visa Registration: Travelers who spend more than three days in Russia must register their visa and migration card through their sponsor. Travelers staying in a hotel must register their visa and migration card with their hotel within one day. Even travelers who spend less than three days in one place are encouraged to register their visas. If a traveler chooses not to register a stay of less than three days, he or she is advised to keep copies of tickets, hotel bills, or itineraries in order to prove compliance with the law.

U.S. citizens should be aware that Russian police officers have the authority to stop people and request their identity and travel documents at any time, and without cause. Due to the possibility of random document checks by police, travelers should carry their original passports, migration cards, and visas with them at all times. Back to Top

Transit Visas: Travelers intending to transit through Russia en route to a third country must have a Russian transit visa. Even travelers who are simply changing planes in Moscow or another international airport in Russia for an onward destination will be asked to present a transit visa issued by a Russian Embassy or Consulate. Russian authorities may refuse to allow a U.S. citizen who does not have a transit visa to continue with his or her travel, obliging the person to immediately return to the point of embarkation at the traveler's own expense. Back to Top

Restricted Areas: U.S. citizens should be aware that there are several closed cities and regions in Russia. Travelers who attempt to enter these areas without prior authorization are subject to arrest, fines, and/or deportation. A traveler must list on the visa application all areas to be visited and subsequently register with authorities upon arrival at each destination. Travelers should check with their sponsor, hotel, or the nearest office of the Russian Federal Migration Service before traveling to unfamiliar cities and towns. Back to Top

American Citizens Also Holding Russian Passports: Dual U.S./Russian nationals who enter Russia on Russian passports face several possible difficulties. Russian authorities will not permit departure from Russia if the person's Russian passport has expired or has been lost, whether or not the traveler also has a valid U.S. passport. In these cases the traveler will be required to obtain a new Russian passport, a process that can take several months. In order to apply for a Russian visa in a U.S. passport, however, Russian consular officials normally require a person to renounce his or her Russian citizenship.

Russian external passports extended by Russian Consulates or Embassies overseas are not considered valid for departure from Russia no matter how long the extension. Bearers of such passports will have to apply for a new passport inside the country. Males of conscript age (18 - 27 years old) who are deemed to be Russian citizens may experience problems if they have not satisfied their military service requirement.

For further information, please see the Department of State's web page on dual nationality. Back to Top

Minors: American citizen minors who also have Russian citizenship and who are traveling on their Russian passports must have a power-of-attorney, written in Russian, allowing them to travel if they are traveling alone or in the company of adults who are not their parents. Such minors will be prevented from entering or leaving Russia if they cannot present such a power-of-attorney.

In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated special procedures at entry/exit points. These often include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child's travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian if not present. Having such documentation on hand, even if not legally required, may facilitate entry/departure. For further information, please see the Department of State's web pages regarding the prevention of international child abduction. Back to Top

International Cruise Ship Passengers: International cruise ship passengers are permitted to visit Russian ports without a visa for a period of up to 72 hours. Passengers who wish to go ashore during port calls may do so without visas provided that they are with an organized tour at all times, accompanied by a tour operator who has been duly licensed by Russian authorities. These special entry/exit requirements do not apply to river boat cruise passengers and travelers coming to Russia on package tours. These travelers will need to apply for visas prior to entry, and should follow the general guidelines for entry/exit requirements. Back to Top

Types of Visas

There are seven basic types of Russian visas: Commercial, Tourist, Student, Guest, Diplomatic, Transit, and visas for entry into the Russian Federation for the purpose of requesting asylum. Russian visas are issued only upon presentation of the appropriate invitation (tourist vouchers or hotel reservations will often suffice) from a Russian source. Only Russian individuals and agencies (hereafter referred to as sponsors) can invite Americans to visit Russia. In doing so, the sponsor takes full responsibility for both the welfare and actions of their American guests. Back to Top

Student Visas: An invitation for a foreign national to enter Russia for the purpose of studying at an educational institution is issued by the PASPORTNY STOL/PVU upon application from the educational institution. Student visas are unique in that they do not include an exit visa, but rather require a separate application for one to the proper Russian authorities. Often, student visas are valid only for three months, with a possible extension by the local PASPORTNY STOL/PVU. Always stamped in passports, they allow foreigners to remain in Russia for the duration of the visa's validity, but not to leave the country upon its expiration. It is the responsibility of your Russian school to ensure timely extensions and obtain permission to exit. If you want to leave Russia before the scheduled time implied by your contract with your school, you have to notify the school visa department long in advance to give them time to file necessary paperwork with the Russian authorities. Under law that time period can be as long as 30 days. Back to Top

Work Visas: There are quotas on invitations to foreigners to enter Russia in order to work. These quotas are established by territorial agencies in the regions and are approved annually by the Russian Government. According to the law, quotas take into account the demographic situation in the relevant region of Russia and its ability to accommodate foreign nationals. This is theoretically based on the principle that priority should be given to the use of domestic labor. The prospective employer must initiate the application process for this type of visa at PASPORTNY STOL/PVU. Prospective employers who hire foreigners must also receive permission from the local branch of the Ministry of Interior's Federal Migration Service. The Federal Migration Service then issues the foreigner a document confirming his legal employment. Please note that Russian authorities may require tests for drugs and infectious diseases for holders of work visas.

There are a few categories of foreigners who can be employed without such a permit: those who have a Russian residency permit or permanent registration with police; church employees; technical experts who come for a short period to assemble imported equipment; and those who come for educational activities. Back to Top

Temporary Residence: Temporary residence is granted for a three-year term. The issuance of temporary residence permits (razreshenie na vremennoe prozhivanie) is subject to a quota established annually by the Government for each separate region of Russia (the quota for the year 2003 was 90,000 for Moscow, 1,000 for St. Petersburg). Certain categories of foreign citizens are not subject to the quota, including, foreign citizens previously citizens of the USSR; foreigners married to Russians residing in Russia; and foreign investors making investments of a magnitude yet to be established.

Temporary residence permits are issued by PASPORTNY STOL/PVU on the basis of an application filed personally by the foreign citizen. The application can be filed either with a local PASPORTNY STOL/PVU or with a Russian Embassy outside Russia and should be reviewed within 6 months. In case of approval, the foreigner can get a visa to enter Russia (visas for person temporarily residing in Russia) with a four-month validity period, which should be extended upon obtaining a temporary residence permit for a period of validity of such permit.

The following documents are required to obtain a temporary residence permit: an application form; four photos; passport; police certificate; applicant's income papers; HIV certificate; and documentation that the foreign citizen is not a drug addict and does not have any infectious diseases.

Foreign citizens who are not subject to the quota for the issuance of a temporary residence permits should additionally submit: marriage certificate and spouse’s passport (if the spouse is a Russian citizen); birth certificate or passport of a USSR citizen (for former Soviet/Russian citizens); document confirming that the foreign citizen has an established place to residence, or consent of Russian citizens registered in Russia at their place of residence to provide a place of residence for the foreign citizen.

A foreigner who holds a temporary residence permit is not required to obtain a work permit if the place of employment is in the territory of the Russian administrative unit (subyekt) where the temporary residence permit was issued.

Temporary residence status also has its own particular restrictions, including mandatory fingerprint registration, restrictions on change of residence within Russia, and annual registration with the internal affairs agencies.

Evidence of temporary residence permit is a stamp "Разрешение на временное проживание" or Temporary Residence Permit, put into the bearer’s passport. The stamp is not/not sufficient for leaving the country. Based on the stamp the local passport authorities at the stamp issuing office only should give the bearer an exit-reentry visa. The stamp is useful and mandatory to have at the time of police document checks as a visa substitute. It will also help the person get a Russian visa outside Russia in case the exit-reentry visa is lost while traveling. Back to Top

Permanent Residence: Foreign citizens intending to permanently reside in Russia can obtain a permanent residence permit (vid na zhitelstvo) valid for five years that may be extended an unlimited number of times. Foreigners may apply for it at the local OVER/PVU based on their at least one-year residence in Russia. The application has to be filed no later than six months prior to the expiration of the temporary residence permit.

The advantages of permanent resident status are ability to work in any part of Russia without a special permit; ability to choose a place of residence in Russia; ability to issue visa invitations to Russia for other foreign citizens in one’s own name.

albina
31-08-2008, 08:41
England ! We liked very much the architecture in Ottawa when we were there in June yrs ago. We had a grin hearing the authority was passing out bottles of water in Syracuse at that time. If they were in Miss. , they would know what REAL humidity and dew are. We wanted to move to Canada but NOT Toronto,as it is not a place one would want to live. We stayed at a hotel where the queen stayed as my wife always calls me cheap, and I went to the hockey museum. Ottawa, Victoria, and Quebec are the places ! I saw the cannon over the St. Laurence yrs ago and the tourist old section. I missed old town in Montreal. One problem is the language. I was there when they wanted to break from the rest of Canada. I did not know they had a chip on thier shoulder. Your posting about Russian visas and such make it sound tougher than moving to Tennessee. I take exception to costs posted about living in places. Prices may be higher but then the people won't be SO fat. Have you heard of obesity being a natl. plague in Norway ? And, if one can not live in N.Y., how do so many Mexicans and Puerto Ricans get by? Live in the car and use the McDonalds.? I just read there are plenty of good paying jobs in Alberta. Millrights, welders, gas and pipeline work,but some people don't want to do real work. I watch POT out of Sask. You know the way things are here. The U.S. is an island. I know one can stay in Canada for 1 yr without boghering one for papers but when I called the scool dist. in Ottawa, they wanted a grand a month for my daughter. I told them I am not some foreigner from China I am from Chicago. Maybe I should say I am a Paki ! I learned that is a Canadian term ! As you know recently there was some riots around Montreal I think. It was covered up in the story but I saw the word Guatamalans. Can you explain WHY they let in 3rd world people. Canada will have more riots like France. Why does the govmnt want that ?

albina
31-08-2008, 08:43
you ? I just reread the post. This forum is too confusing the way it is orchestrated.

Bels
31-08-2008, 18:01
you ? I just reread the post. This forum is too confusing the way it is orchestrated.

Look at the bottom of my post,is it not plain to see my nationality. Look at my pictures I promote above. I promote British culture :) At the moment it's Doctor Kto and the Daleks.

Zago
29-01-2009, 01:27
i am, and have been many times, registered at my own apartment. no other person is registered there. i do have to take a russian gf to chistie prudi post office to do the registration along with copy sveditilnost and the regular visa, imig card and passport copies. i have never had any problem going this route and in the past i have used other russians to supply a passport. any bomzhe from kazanski can be your ''passport''. hey dont care as long as its russian.

svelt, what you say is difficult to believe? You say that you got yourself registered to your own apartment but it depends on your staying document - a visa or TRP? if on a visa then no matter someone is registered in your apt or not you still can't register yourself. The FMS people or the post office will not accept your docs. Next, why you took your gf to do the registration? here something is not clear. Your gf can regsiter you at her apt and not in yours until unless she is not registered first in your apt. What do you mean "supply a passport". Simply gettign a RF Passport will not help you getting the registration by going to the post office. Please clear things for us.
thanks

Zago
29-01-2009, 01:31
As a fellow foreigner who owns a flat here...

I've registered myself (and family) many times. However, my friend who is in the same situation was just called by the FMS (last week)and told that he cannot register himself following some sort of ruling in Jan, 2007. I was told by a couple of Post Offices that they would not take my registration forms for this reason. I thought they were just reluctant to handle my case. As posted above, an RF national needs to be registered first, given a power of attourney (doverenost) then they can in turn register you. Not looking forward to paying the 1000rbls + to my visa agency for registering through them...
The joy and pain of ownership

YES,YOU COULD REGISTER BEFORE THIS NEW RULE WHICH CAME IN EFFECT FROM JAN-2007.

QmisterX
17-02-2009, 20:58
I am Canadian and on a business Visa with permission to work in Russia
I may be wrong but Russian business visas never grant permissions to work.

ilya25
09-02-2010, 16:49
According to my company (I am Canadian and on a business Visa with permission to work in Russia) When I go home for the holidays I need to re-apply for single entry work permit, take the HIV test again, and it all seems to be a bit muddled and confusing. Can't seem to get a straight answer from anyone here or the Russian embassy in Toronto. Anyone finding that if they leave they can't come back as easily as they thought?

A bit stressful......:sick:

biz visa does not allow to work in russia to do it officially you need work visa and work permit work visa is usually multi-entry and valid for 1 y

most likely you are getting single entry visa to escape 90/180 rule for multi entry biz visas - that is why you need to apply for a new one every time you leave the country

Bels
09-02-2010, 23:32
biz visa does not allow to work in russia to do it officially you need work visa and work permit work visa is usually multi-entry and valid for 1 y

most likely you are getting single entry visa to escape 90/180 rule for multi entry biz visas - that is why you need to apply for a new one every time you leave the country

I might be out of date. But take guidence from your employer if they are used to employing expats. Yes you may well enter on an ordinary business visa. but it will be extended on their guidance. If you have areputable known international company , I do suggest you follow their guidance, and your visa will eventually be extended, and you will get your work permit.

But regulations do change constantly here, and we must learn from others experiences, and I am no longer in this situation.

New experiences are welcome here, Top international employers or representatives of their companies being members here would be more than welcome here. In fact any expertise, knowledge or experience is more than welcome here.