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JVRR
20-11-2010, 11:30
Any recommendations on (specifically) foreigner-friendly Orthodox churches in Moscow?

rusmeister
20-11-2010, 13:59
Try this church out for services in English:
http://www.st-catherine.ru/?set_lang=eng
It's downtown, near Dobryninskaya

If you don't need English services, but just friendly Russians who speak English, pm me. There's a good church near the McDonald's on Okhotny Ryad.

tvadim133
20-11-2010, 15:41
Any recommendations on (specifically) foreigner-friendly Orthodox churches in Moscow?

it depends upon your goal.

If you want just to visit them, you can enter any wihout any problems. Just follow the common rules for all: men are without hats, women's heads must be covered with smth and wearing not trousers.

If you want to talk to a priest, I suggest it can be problematic in Moscow, though I can be mistaken.

JVRR
20-11-2010, 21:03
Thanks guys!

My goal is to find a church, I am Orthodox :).

rusmeister
21-11-2010, 05:17
Thanks guys!

My goal is to find a church, I am Orthodox :).

Join the (rather small) crowd! (of American/British, etc Orthodox expats here)

Although in the end, there are other factors besides the language the service is in to consider, but if you have no knowledge of Russian, you're probably best off for now at St Catherine's.

I am in a really good church - not small and exclusive at all, and not monstrous - but it's outside of Moscow. If you don't mind adventurous treks and services in Russian, you're welcome to come to mine - again, pm me. Free dinner after the service! ;)

Have a blessed Advent season!
(And this year we Americans get Thanksgiving in just under the door before Lent starts...)

JVRR
21-11-2010, 10:34
Russian services would be no concern, I have been to only one service in english. The point is I know what the service means, whether I know what each word means or not is not important. I have spent most my time at Greek parishes. I will definitely keep this thread in mind once I hit Moscow come January.

I have been wondering which name to use once in Russia. My Christian/middle name of Vladimir, or my traditional first name of James. I would hate to give off any false impressions by introducing myself as Vladimir, though I agree with many that I should be going by my Christian name anyway (and only do not because my parents are dirty protestants and do not understand ;)).

kharaku
21-11-2010, 14:02
Any recommendations on (specifically) foreigner-friendly Orthodox churches in Moscow?

On a semi related note does anyone know if Christ the Savior Cathedral has liturgy on Sundays or whether it is only for special holidays?

MickeyTong
21-11-2010, 18:23
....my parents are dirty protestants...

....and words like "tact" and "diplomacy" are not in your vocabulary. Now that you have joined "the pure", perhaps your conceptual matrix will expand to include "mercy" and "humility", thus squeezing out "conceit".

rusmeister
21-11-2010, 19:24
(and only do not because my parents are dirty protestants and do not understand ;)).

I'd say it'd be a good idea to qualify that remark myself. It does seem odd even in the most charitable interpretation (some private meaning to the term) and insulting in more direct interpretation by people that don't know your context (like me, for example). And as you can see, even if you mean something innocuous, both the serious doubters and the hecklers will jump all over you for something like that (although the hecklers'll do it no matter what you say).

kharaku
21-11-2010, 19:28
I'd say it'd be a good idea to qualify that remark myself. It does seem odd even in the most charitable interpretation (some private meaning to the term) and insulting in more direct interpretation by people that don't know your context (like me, for example). And as you can see, even if you mean something innocuous, both the serious doubters and the hecklers will jump all over you for something like that (although the hecklers'll do it no matter what you say).

Maybe he meant they bath infrequently?

JVRR
21-11-2010, 20:21
Sorry guys all in jest, I was raised a protestant and have no dislike for it. I know some Orthodox do, whenever I hear someone say something degrading about protestants I point out I would have never found my way to the Orthodox church if I had not found the protestant church first (I was not raised anything until about 10 or 11 we started attending a protestant church).

No offense intended, my parents and I jab each other that way :). I see where context is important, always forget that can be lost on the internet!

FatAndy
21-11-2010, 21:24
James aka Vladimir,

You can visit any of chirches, with precautions mentioned by Vadim.
BTW, initially Vladimir was neither Orthodox nor Christian name, although Grand Duke Vladimir (aka Baptist of ancient Russia) has level of Saint Equal-to-Apostel in Russian Orthodox Church. It was ancient Slavic name:
Vladi - from владеть (to be owner/ruler, to have power over smth)
Mir - world
Giving this name, parents probably dreamed that their son will be owner of whole world ;)

JVRR
23-11-2010, 01:13
Yes this is where it comes from, Saint Vladimir was adopted as my patron saint as I joined the church, and I took the name when Christmated. I took an additional step and added it legally, hence "JVRR" and why I have four names.

I decided to just add it as that would be the easiest for my parents to understand/go with.

(It was my family's Russian heritage that first got me interested in Orthodoxy, so Saint Vladimir seemed the perfect choice.)

Billie Bob
23-11-2010, 22:23
sorry, just noticed this post...

There are a few expat 'safe' orthodox churches to go to in Moscow, and speak to an English Speaking Orthodox Priest if necessary:

1) St Catherines, which is on mal ordynka, its the "Podvorie of the OCA". the Archimandrite is Father Zacchaeuss, (native new yorker).

2) Andreievski Monastery, along the embankment of the Moscow River, Father Christopher Hill, a native from england serves there.

I wouldn't call churches unsafe, but if what you meant that you might stand out in the crowd, well, I somehow doubt people will consider you an alien. As long as you behave and cause no threat in 'any' temple, Im sure it will always be safe. However saying that, those babushki can be a pain :)

as to the question if Christ The Savior Church serves liturgy on sunday mornings, yes it does.

rusmeister
24-11-2010, 03:47
sorry, just noticed this post...

There are a few expat 'safe' orthodox churches to go to in Moscow, and speak to an English Speaking Orthodox Priest if necessary:

1) St Catherines, which is on mal ordynka, its the "Podvorie of the OCA". the Archimandrite is Father Zacchaeuss, (native new yorker).

2) Andreievski Monastery, along the embankment of the Moscow River, Father Christopher Hill, a native from england serves there.

I wouldn't call churches unsafe, but if what you meant that you might stand out in the crowd, well, I somehow doubt people will consider you an alien. As long as you behave and cause no threat in 'any' temple, Im sure it will always be safe. However saying that, those babushki can be a pain :)

as to the question if Christ The Savior Church serves liturgy on sunday mornings, yes it does.

My friends are friends with Fr Christopher, too. I met him myself, but it's been several years. I'm guessing he's gotten his permanent residency by now.

Billie Bob
24-11-2010, 09:11
My friends are friends with Fr Christopher, too. I met him myself, but it's been several years. I'm guessing he's gotten his permanent residency by now.

haven't seen him too, but am aware that's he's still in town :)

Russian Lad
29-11-2010, 20:56
I was not raised anything until about 10 or 11 we started attending a protestant church

In other words, you were indoctrinated since your childhood and did not even have a choice but be a Christian. Such a shame.

kharaku
01-12-2010, 13:10
In other words, you were indoctrinated since your childhood and did not even have a choice but be a Christian. Such a shame.

If you had the cure to cancer and your child had cancer would you ask your child if being cured of cancer was something they had thought over and deeply considered?