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Sarindar
29-10-2010, 17:15
I posted this on another thread here but didn't get a response and I'm hoping someone here knows the answer.

I am living in the US with my Russian wife and we are trying to document my son's Russian citizenship. He was born in the US but has a Russian mother and thus has Russian citizenship. But we need to jump through some hoops to document it (we plan to move back to Russia in a couple years).

We would like to dictate how his name will be written, both in Latin and Cyrillic characters. However, my understanding is that the process will basically be that the Russian consulate will transliterate, letter by letter (from his US passport or birth certificate), my son's name into Cyrillic based on some letter by letter transliteration table. Having reviewed the table I see that this is going to create a somewhat strange result. I would like to control the Cyrillic spelling of the name. In reality, I'm not sure this is an issue. It's possible they will simply write his name in Cyrillic according to the spelling on the application. Can anyone confirm that this will or won't be a problem? Does anyone know how to resolve this if it is a problem?

xSnoofovich
29-10-2010, 17:22
What is his name?

Sarindar
29-10-2010, 17:30
What is his name?
His US birth certificate says Adam Samuel Russell.

I want his Russian name to be Адам Самуилович Рассел.

rosieredwood
29-10-2010, 17:34
Parent(s) must take a child to a special registry to receive a birth certificate, where they (he/she) show proof of Russian citizenship in order to obtain Russian citizenship for their offspring. In short, your child does not have Russian citizenship and will only be able to obtain it if your wife flies to Russia with him, goes to one of these registries and does this.

It is very complicated; and, again unfortunately, you will not be able to dictate how his name will be spelled in English.

Also, they will ask that you sign a "waiver", stating that you have no objections to his becoming a Russian citizen, because Russia does not recognize dual citizenship -- having two passports attesting to two different nationalities is not the same as "dual" citizenship, as in countries such as Sweden/Finland, et al, Multiple citizenship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Ambox_globe_content.svg" class="image"><img alt="Globe icon." src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bd/Ambox_globe_content.svg/48px-Ambox_globe_content.svg.png"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/thumb/b/bd/Ambox_globe_content.svg/48px-Ambox_globe_content.svg.png

xSnoofovich
29-10-2010, 17:55
Parent(s) must take a child to a special registry to receive a birth certificate, where they (he/she) show proof of Russian citizenship in order to obtain Russian citizenship for their offspring.

But, couldn't he do this all thru the local Russian embassy? It would seem to me that as his (the child's) mother is Russian, he himself would be considered a Russian citizen?

Besides, wouldn't she have to do that at some point in time with her internal passport? (have her child's name written in?)

Sarindar
29-10-2010, 17:56
Whether or not he technically has Russian citizenship and needs to document it or doesn't have Russian citizenship and needs to apply for it is more philosophical than I would like to get. The point is, provided we supply the correct documents, he will be granted documents stating that he is a Russian citizen. In reality, the document stating that he is a Russian citizen will be attached to his US birth certificate and will state that the child has a right to Russian citizenship. Therefore, I chose to the position that he has Russian citizenship that simply needs to be documented.

Your information that this must be done in Russia is flat wrong. The Russian consulate site, which I cannot link to due to post count restrictions, shows that this can be done at the Russian consulate in NYC. Similarly, it can be done in other consulates. You're correct that I will have to sign a document and although there is a way to notarize said document in theory, in practice, I will simply have to go to the consulate with my wife and work things out.

So are you confirming that we will be unable to control how his name is spelled on his Russian passport in English characters?

SV1973a
29-10-2010, 18:06
Whether or not he technically has Russian citizenship and needs to document it or doesn't have Russian citizenship and needs to apply for it is more philosophical than I would like to get. The point is, provided we supply the correct documents, he will be granted documents stating that he is a Russian citizen. In reality, the document stating that he is a Russian citizen will be attached to his US birth certificate and will state that the child has a right to Russian citizenship. Therefore, I chose to the position that he has Russian citizenship that simply needs to be documented.

Your information that this must be done in Russia is flat wrong. The Russian consulate site, which I cannot link to due to post count restrictions, shows that this can be done at the Russian consulate in NYC. Similarly, it can be done in other consulates. You're correct that I will have to sign a document and although there is a way to notarize said document in theory, in practice, I will simply have to go to the consulate with my wife and work things out.

So are you confirming that we will be unable to control how his name is spelled on his Russian passport in English characters?

Then why did not you call him Samuelovich ?
If your name is Samual I think there is a chance that they will give him Samuelovich as patronymic. Why don`t you try to write it like that on the notarised translation of the birth certificate ?
When my daughter was born (2002) we were able to have Paulina transliterated to Полина.
But that was at the Russian consulate in my home country.
When we moved to Russia, her name was transliterated back as Polina.
Now that is what is on her passport.
Then on the second page of the passport, they wrote (by hand) that her name in fact is Paulina.
To make things logical I guess...
By the way, I gave both my girls the patronymic, derived from my first name, as is usually done in Russia. In my home country, on their passport they have the patronymic as well.