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sweetfart
04-08-2010, 03:29
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?


I'd like to hear your stories.

trancophile
04-08-2010, 09:43
1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

I’m from New Zealand (Новая Зеландия). I had no previous connections with Russia aside from knowing a few Russians and having had a Russian girlfriend back home.

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

I first ended up in Russia not long after finishing university. It’s common for us to leave New Zealand after university for some overseas experience. I was first here for a year (07-08) as one of the lucky last to have a one year business visa that meant you could stay the whole year without leaving.

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

I teach English, mainly at kindergartens because it often pays better than teaching adults at a school. I’d like to work in another area and I don't like how I am limited in what I can do here, but I’d probably require fluent Russian, which brings me to the next question.

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

I understand more than I can use. I’m probably lower intermediate. I like to spend time with Russians but I can’t say I am well immersed. If I had the right friends and opportunity I’d be more so.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

Right now, I’d leave in an instant, but are in too deep to do that presently. New Zealand is one of the most comfortable and environmentally pristine places in the world and I value that immensely. Pity it lacks in other important areas. Also, being a NZ citizen means I can move about most of the world with ease, so I often find myself asking, why stay in Russia?

Gypsy
04-08-2010, 09:53
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?
I am English, my home is in France. No previous connection with Russia.

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now? I was a Management Consultant specialising in helping companies with growth problems, particularly in Europe not the UK. I got a call to come and help a UK company that was growing fast but with all the usual problems that brings, and no idea how to address them It is a typical scenario. I was supposed to be here 3 months and have now been here over 4 years.


3. What do you do for a living in Russia? Partner in a firm that is a hybrid of property development and asset management.


4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are? Very badly. I am learning though. Immersed in Russian society. Not really - I do have many russian friends, our company is russian and we employ only russians.


5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing? No. I have found the place I want to spend the rest of my life - in France.

Carbo
04-08-2010, 10:33
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?
British subject.


2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?
Got here by train. 3 years now.


3. What do you do for a living in Russia?
Teaching the locals how to do things properly. Complaining about how terrible it is here. Making snide and borderline racist comments about Russians.

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?
No. Why should I? If they can’t understand English, it’s best just to shout louder, and perhaps gesticulate wildly. And if they’re still not civilized enough to learn – their problem, not mine.

Russian society? Does the Scandinavia terrace in summer and picking up girls at GQ Bar count?

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?
Temporary. I’m here to have sex with the girls, earn far, far more money than I could ever earn at home, pay much lower taxes, do anything I want and then bribe my way out of it (only to later complain about corruption to everyone) and party around the city. Certainly not interested in staying or making a contribution to society here. Will leave as soon as the gravy train stops.

Is that about right, Guest?

dontcallme
04-08-2010, 10:55
1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

England. No connections with Russia at all.

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

I passed some courses to become an English teacher and started applying for jobs in Eastern Europe and Russia and got plenty of offers. 2 years.

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

Teach English

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

Very basic Russian. Not at all sadly.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

No, I'll be leaving in 4 days for good.

Gypsy
04-08-2010, 11:39
Temporary. Im here to have sex with the girls, earn far, far more money than I could ever earn at home, pay much lower taxes, do anything I want and then bribe my way out of it (only to later complain about corruption to everyone) and party around the city. Certainly not interested in staying or making a contribution to society here. Will leave as soon as the gravy train stops.

Is that about right, Guest?

You're one of those capitalist running dogs of imperialism aren't you?

Mirka
04-08-2010, 14:06
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?


I'd like to hear your stories.

(1) I am from Slovakia. No previous connections to Russia except Russian occupation of CzechoSlovakia for 20 years.
(2) I was working for Dutch company. I was working as Controller and executive in Slovak Entity and part of Senior Management board of CzechoSlovak team. After 7 years I got bored and asked my boss to move me. He suggested to post my CV on our corporate web and I got an offer from Moscow (from a person I worked with before, really valued that man and wanted to work with him again) and accepted. I am here almost 3 years now.
(3) Currently I am CFO for Russia, Ukraine and Baltics in German/British company (After 2 years in the Dutch one I changed companies)
(4) I speak Russian. I am not really immerse in Russian society. More like Gypsy. I have couple of friends but hang out mostly with expats. I am going to a Russian wedding this weekend :) I believe that is going to be one hell of an experience :)
(5) Absolutely sure I will not stay here for the rest of my life. Temporary thing for me. Not sure where I go after Russia yet. So far enjoying my work and social life and other things that Moscow has to offer and happy at the same time to travel for work to be able to have enough breaks from crazy Moscow :)

inorcist
04-08-2010, 22:25
Some kind of small talk but why not ;-)



1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?
2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?
3. What do you do for a living in Russia?
4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?
5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

1. Germany, but have lived in Switzerland ever since I moved out of my parents' place. I had no connection to Russia at all when I first got there. Except that I was curious and wanted to be somewhere completely different.

2. I was in Moscow to work there for about half a year and liked it so much that I decided to return as soon as I have a decent opportunity. I will return to Russia in a couple of weeks.

3. Work in the banking / finance industry as a specialist. I refrain from explaining it in more detail as even my boss had problems today formulating my job description.

4. I started to study when I was here for the first time, I'd describe myself as an advanced beginner but I want to improve my level for sure. Most of my friends outside work are Russians who spent quite some time of their lives abroad.

5. There are too many other places I'd like to live in. Unlikely, that I'll stay in Russia forever.

Bels
04-08-2010, 23:17
Please! You don't mean that you are leaving Russia for good. Although my Russian family feels that way. They don't realise that it can be tough in any country to settle, and there will be cultural differences. But yes we plan to move in the next few years. I prefer an English native speaking country of where I can function best, however my wife prefers France as a choice. But I don't speak French, and I hate the language!


1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

England. No connections with Russia at all.

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

I passed some courses to become an English teacher and started applying for jobs in Eastern Europe and Russia and got plenty of offers. 2 years.

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

Teach English

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

Very basic Russian. Not at all sadly.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

No, I'll be leaving in 4 days for good.

Bels
04-08-2010, 23:26
I came here 6 years ago. I have survival Russian for shops, restaurant, and taxis. But no I can't have a long enjoyable conversation with a Russian, I normally either nod, or say NYE Panemayo when they expect an answer. But what surprises some of my students is that I understand more than I speak. But to be honest I am only picking up key words as to what I know already what they are going to talk about. So in a way I am bluffing. And many Russians do the same to me , and say they understand :.

I teach privately, and don't know of any other way to gain a decent family income. I have tried offers from sdhools, but unfortunately the offers were too low for a family man with future plans for a home and a house, and good education for two children. and let us not forget our future health

GaNozri
05-08-2010, 00:39
British subject.


Got here by train. 3 years now.


Teaching the locals how to do things properly. Complaining about how terrible it is here. Making snide and borderline racist comments about Russians.

No. Why should I? If they cant understand English, its best just to shout louder, and perhaps gesticulate wildly. And if theyre still not civilized enough to learn their problem, not mine.

Russian society? Does the Scandinavia terrace in summer and picking up girls at GQ Bar count?

Temporary. Im here to have sex with the girls, earn far, far more money than I could ever earn at home, pay much lower taxes, do anything I want and then bribe my way out of it (only to later complain about corruption to everyone) and party around the city. Certainly not interested in staying or making a contribution to society here. Will leave as soon as the gravy train stops.

Is that about right, Guest?

Carbo, in over 3 years of reading your posts, this is the first that made me smile. So, you DO have a sense of humour after all. Albeit an English one...
You sound almost like a true Moscovite. Actually, you probably are one, because being a moscovite is not about where you or your parents where born any more, but a state of mind. Just like being a New Yorker.

So, my fellow Moscovite, I wish you the best of luck in your quest to "have sex with the girls, earn far, far more money than I could ever earn at home, pay much lower taxes, do anything I want and then bribe my way out of it (only to later complain about corruption to everyone) and party around the city". And I truly hope that our gravy train never ends!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kraven Morehead
05-08-2010, 01:21
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?


I'd like to hear your stories.

1 Canada, Ex Russian GF (she was living in Canada) was going to take me. Broke up and said F*ck it and went anyways

2 Trying to get back (or Ukraine)

3 I am a controller.

4 Not very well, but when I was there, I loved being around Russians. They truly believe the work to live versus the west we live to work. Just fun people, rotten workers, but fun people.

5 When you are up sh*t creek without paddle, you go with the flow. Love to stay, but I do not like the anti foreigner attitude. My dad once told me that never play monopoly when the opposing player is the banker, property manager, and dealings out the houses & hotels.

sweetfart
05-08-2010, 01:27
I prefer an English native speaking country of where I can function best, however my wife prefers France as a choice. But I don't speak French, and I hate the language!

She sounds like a typical Russian in that regard. I never understood why Russians admire France and the French culture so much. Granted, it's fancy and what not with some interesting history but the country really hasn't made much of an impact on the world in hundreds of years. And there's nothing particularly charming about the stereotypical French attitude and mentality.

Kraven Morehead
05-08-2010, 01:32
She sounds like a typical Russian in that regard. I never understood why Russians admire France and the French culture so much. Granted, it's fancy and what not with some interesting history but the country really hasn't made much of an impact on the world in hundreds of years. And there's nothing particularly charming about the stereotypical French attitude and mentality.

Both countries
Women dress really fine.
Drinking well and often is encouraged.
Treating foreigners badly
Men lack of deorderdant in the Metro
Sovoks and French Unions have the same attitude

GaNozri
05-08-2010, 01:37
And there's nothing particularly charming about the stereotypical French attitude and mentality.

As opposed to the charming stereotypical american attitude and mentality?

Kraven Morehead
05-08-2010, 01:48
As opposed to the charming stereotypical american attitude and mentality?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_Ku2UCbhL4

kleft
05-08-2010, 04:42
1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

USA. Wife is Russian, so she grew up in Russia and moved to US after college...

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

Moved to Russia as part of move to Europe, chose Russia because I could get residency through wife, have always been interested in Russia and of course wife has roots here. 1.5 years now.

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

I don't really do anything in Russia per say. I am director of technology for Europe for my company and travel throughout Europe.

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

Yes, conversational level...intermediate to early advanced I guess. Not very immersed in Russian society as I am often in other countries during the week and have no ties via job or what not to Russia.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

Good question, we'll see how it goes:). So far it's been fun...

sweetfart
05-08-2010, 07:07
Both countries
Women dress really fine.
Drinking well and often is encouraged.
Treating foreigners badly
Men lack of deorderdant in the Metro
Sovoks and French Unions have the same attitude

The body odor problem is not limited to Russians and French, that's widespread throughout Europe and the Middle East. Although anthropologists argue that if your ancestors came from warmer climates you're supposed to sweat more. Theoretically that means if you put a Russian and a Sicilian in the same room and turn up the heat the Sicilian should start dripping in sweat faster. So how these Russian guys can smell as bad as sweaty Pakistani construction workers is impressive. Well, I realize there is much more to bad odor than just sweating. But still.

mk182
05-08-2010, 08:00
Its crazy how most Russians just assume they don't even need deodorant in the first place.

Many of my good male Russian friends have nice jobs and do fairly well for themselves inside and outside of Moscow. Heck one even visited me recently here in the US.

They just DON'T put on deodorant. Its like, breaking the news to tell someone for the first time who didn't know they snored. Their reaction is usually shock and denial followed by lashing out and accusations that you, are infact the one that snores, or smells bad.
"dude, you smell"
-"NO! NO I DON'T"
"yeah, man, you do. Everyone does, its cool, we can do something about it"
-"NO! No you smell! Screw you!"

Its a little mind boggling. Especially seeing as how every Russian woman I know applies multiple layers of body odor protection... How can these women smell so good and the men be so blind?

But I digress.

Kraven Morehead
05-08-2010, 09:37
The body odor problem is not limited to Russians and French, that's widespread throughout Europe and the Middle East. Although anthropologists argue that if your ancestors came from warmer climates you're supposed to sweat more. Theoretically that means if you put a Russian and a Sicilian in the same room and turn up the heat the Sicilian should start dripping in sweat faster. So how these Russian guys can smell as bad as sweaty Pakistani construction workers is impressive. Well, I realize there is much more to bad odor than just sweating. But still.

Russian and French women smell good (better than most) the men are horrible.For some, it is sweating out alcohol.

I think Russian women hide money under the men's deodorant so the men can't find it.

annasophia
05-08-2010, 11:43
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:I'd like to hear your stories.

1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?

USA. No connection whatsoever with Russia before arrival except having read a great deal of Russian literature in translation.

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?

I ended up in Russia as a 'trailing spouse'. We stayed five years and the company made us leave (rules and all). Barring the concrete deadline, we'd have stayed, I think.....forever.

3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

I was a dvornik. Spouse was a building engineer.

4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

I spoke not a single word of Russian when I arrived, not one. The first night in after the flight we went out to get a bite to eat and I learned my first Russian word, piva. One day, one word.

I remember it well, there was a Brittany Spears music video on the screen in this Russian restaurant and I asked the server if they liked Brittany Spears in Russia and he looked at me with disdain as if I was a moron and said yes of course she was HOT! (that was way back when....). After five years my Russian was godawful but improving.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

Russia I could have stayed in for the rest of my life. Moscow, no.

soleil888
05-08-2010, 12:36
можно мне ответить???
итак:

1. В какой стране вы? Было ли у вас каких-либо связей с Россией, до переезда в Россию?

я родилась в Татарии, где мой дед-поляк жил после советского лагеря на поселении. мне было 3 года, когда меня перевезли в Самару. только в 14 лет мой отчим (я его очень любила, он был настоящий отец, и умер 6 лет назад) сказал мне, что моя семья - поляки.

2. Как вы в конечном итоге в России? Как давно это было сейчас?

я училась (режиссер детский театр) в Самара.
с 1993 г - Москва. Литературный институт им. Горького.
учитель русский язык, но !!! для русских. программы обучения разные русский язык для иностранцев и для носителей языка.

3. Что вы делаете для жизни в России?

я живу в России. это моя Родина. по крови я полька, но сердце у меня русское.

4. Говорите ли вы русский язык? Как хорошо погруженным в русском обществе скажете вы?

я знаю русский язык :). литературный, разговорный, просторечный итак далее и такое прочее :)

5. Как вы думаете, вы будете находиться в России до конца вашей жизни или это всего лишь временное явление?

да, я буду жить только в России. возможно я уеду из Москва. думаю о Сибирь. пока это мечты.

я считать человек той национальности является, на языке которой он ДУМАТЬ! я думаю по русски.

annasophia
05-08-2010, 12:49
^^^^
soleil, that was lovely. :agree:

tvadim133
05-08-2010, 12:55
She sounds like a typical Russian in that regard. I never understood why Russians admire France and the French culture so much. Granted, it's fancy and what not with some interesting history but the country really hasn't made much of an impact on the world in hundreds of years. And there's nothing particularly charming about the stereotypical French attitude and mentality.

Good question!

I would say I like French culture and would like to live in France (for one year, not for ever) as well.

Why?

It is not connected with the impact to the world, which is made or not made by France.

First of all, France become the new motherland to many russians after the revolution and France and Russia have more than a lot of connections from this point of view.

Besides, mentality (way of thinking only and may be behaviour) is very close to many russians, I think.

France has more than good relationship with Russia for ages and never considered to be an enemy even in the cold war.

May be there are some other reasons.

Viola
05-08-2010, 12:56
Soleil, your post reminds me of another Pole with Russian soul. She sang in Russian and had a wonderful Russian repertoire, like in this romance based on Lermontov's poem,

YouTube- ‪Анна Герман - Выхожу один я на дорогу‬‎

Viola
05-08-2010, 13:06
Good question!

I would say I like French culture and would like to live in France (for one year, not for ever) as well.

Why?

It is not connected with the impact to the world, which is made or not made by France.

First of all, France become the new motherland to many russians after the revolution and France and Russia have more than a lot of connections from this point of view.

Besides, mentality (way of thinking only and may be behaviour) is very close to many russians, I think.

France has more than good relationship with Russia for ages and never considered to be an enemie even in the cold war.

May be there are some other reasons.

First Russia became a home for many French after the French revolution, just read Tolstoy if you need proof (not addressing you Vadim, I am sure you know:)). At that time Russian aristocracy spoke French as their mother tongue and had poor Russian. Russia has been greatly influenced by French in 19th century. Furthermore after the war 1812 when Russian troops occupied Paris not only gentry but even simple people (soldiers) became acquainted with Frech lifestyle and wanted to copy many things when back at home. All things French has been extremely popular in Russia always.

tvadim133
05-08-2010, 13:15
Its crazy how most Russians just assume they don't even need deodorant in the first place.

Many of my good male Russian friends have nice jobs and do fairly well for themselves inside and outside of Moscow. Heck one even visited me recently here in the US.

They just DON'T put on deodorant. Its like, breaking the news to tell someone for the first time who didn't know they snored. Their reaction is usually shock and denial followed by lashing out and accusations that you, are infact the one that snores, or smells bad.
"dude, you smell"
-"NO! NO I DON'T"
"yeah, man, you do. Everyone does, its cool, we can do something about it"
-"NO! No you smell! Screw you!"

Its a little mind boggling. Especially seeing as how every Russian woman I know applies multiple layers of body odor protection... How can these women smell so good and the men be so blind?

But I digress.

Interesting example.

Actually I did not made any researches and I do not have a hobby to sniff other people's armpits.

May be Russian men are smelling indeed, but I guess among population there are who use deodorant and those who do not care of it at all.

I use with pleasure at least.

I saw many "westerns" who do not shave armpits, do not cut the hair in noises and ears (very wealthy westerns, actually my ex-bosses).

Is it typical for the West or just bad examples btw?

:)

Matt24
05-08-2010, 13:48
Sorry if this thread was on here in the past already, but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested to know how all of you ended up in Russia. Here are my questions:

[QUOTE=sweetfart;706813]1. What country are you from? Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?
Northern Ireland, my boss in a previous life managed to find himself in charge of a 'commercialisation' project in the Urals - and bought in his sheep like drones

2. How did you end up in Russia? How long has it been now?
BA 17th June 1994


3. What do you do for a living in Russia?

very little of our business is done in Russia at the moment, I co-own an industrial design agency, we generally accept commissions to make things lighter and slippery-er for medical related industries, instruments / implants/ Pharmaceuticals - We live in Moscow because we like it here, my wife is a Russian and it's a great place to bring up kids - I have a son and a daughter who are at school in England, and a baby son who is sitting next to me in our chilled out office.


4. Do you speak Russian? How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are?

I speak enough Russian to get by at a reasonably complex level, however no one would assume I was a mother tongue speaker, or possibly had ever met one - I read and write much better than I speak, and I'd say I've got a 90% comprehension level when listening.

I work with a Kiwi, our business language is probably English - although the synthesis of a Palmerston North accent and Belfast swearing might actually be a new language altogether - otherwise I am deeply immersed in Russian life - I watch East Enders, so I can keep up to date with the vernacular.


5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing?

I think I'll be going back and forth to Russia for the rest of my life, but I think we're probably going to head off to the English speaking world on a semi permanent basis for a few years, I'm keen that number 2 son gets a western education - with plenty of team sports - I think Russian weather will also drive us out as we get older - this summer and last winter were a tiny bit of a turn off.



like to hear your stories.

MickeyTong
05-08-2010, 15:45
They just DON'T put on deodorant.

Is it a macho thing? Real men smell of sweat and only women and queers wear perfume? Like in the West, pre-1960s?

MickeyTong
05-08-2010, 15:50
I am director of technology for Europe for my company and travel throughout Europe.

So far it's been fun...

How do you people get these jobs??????

mk182
05-08-2010, 15:54
Is it a macho thing? Real men smell of sweat and only women and queers wear perfume? Like in the West, pre-1960s?

I don't know. Most Russian men seem to have a set structure of what a 'real man' should be. Usually its beaten into them by their mothers from a young age and involves working brutally long hours to support your underprivileged family, not asking where your 14 year old daughter dissapears to at nights and setting your son's broken nose at home in the kitchen sink. And then dying of either lung cancer or jaundice at around 38 so your wife can buy a BMW and marry a rich dude half her age.

So maybe smelling like a dog's ass fits somewhere into that picture.

I know my Russian girlfriend has on many occasions tried to get me to shave my armpit hair. Something I will never do. It doesn't stink, so why punish it?

MickeyTong
05-08-2010, 15:56
[quote=sweetfart;706813]we generally accept commissions to make things lighter and slippery-er for medical related industries, instruments / implants/ Pharmaceuticals -

Does that involve nanotech stuff? I did an OU course which had a very interesting nanotech section (apart from the maths - I fkcuing hate maths).

The future is very, very small.......

Viola
05-08-2010, 16:04
I don't know. Most Russian men seem to have a set structure of what a 'real man' should be. Usually its beaten into them by their mothers from a young age and involves working brutally long hours to support your underprivileged family, not asking where your 14 year old daughter dissapears to at nights and setting your son's broken nose at home in the kitchen sink. And then dying of either lung cancer or jaundice at around 38 so your wife can buy a BMW and marry a rich dude half her age.

So maybe smelling like a dog's ass fits somewhere into that picture.

I know my Russian girlfriend has on many occasions tried to get me to shave my armpit hair. Something I will never do. It doesn't stink, so why punish it?

Oh God that's funny!! Can't keep LOL :D Where did you get that grim picture?

Swordfish90293
05-08-2010, 16:12
YouTube- ‪Johnny Cash - Wanted Man (San Quentin)‬‎

YouTube- ‪Blue Velvet-Tom Waits: Walk Away‬‎

trancophile
05-08-2010, 17:18
I don't know. Most Russian men seem to have a set structure of what a 'real man' should be. Usually its beaten into them by their mothers from a young age and involves working brutally long hours to support your underprivileged family, not asking where your 14 year old daughter dissapears to at nights and setting your son's broken nose at home in the kitchen sink. And then dying of either lung cancer or jaundice at around 38 so your wife can buy a BMW and marry a rich dude half her age.

So maybe smelling like a dog's ass fits somewhere into that picture.

I know my Russian girlfriend has on many occasions tried to get me to shave my armpit hair. Something I will never do. It doesn't stink, so why punish it?

Ha ha, applicable to so many and so, so hilariously so.

trancophile
05-08-2010, 17:20
How do you people get these jobs??????

I second that. Most people here have a toally wishy washy job and don't do a hell of a lot, but make heaps of money. Most who I've come across are not particularly smart either.

I want in.

kassandra
05-08-2010, 17:45
I second that. Most people here have a toally wishy washy job and don't do a hell of a lot, but make heaps of money. Most who I've come across are not particularly smart either.

I want in.

Seems they are smart enough to get in :)
Are you?

trancophile
05-08-2010, 17:58
Net, I'm only on 100,000 rubies a month. Peanuts compared to these swindlers! We'll be accused of digressing so let's keep out liasons secret ;)

kassandra
05-08-2010, 18:07
Net, I'm only on 100,000 rubies a month. Peanuts compared to these swindlers! We'll be accused of digressing so let's keep out liasons secret ;)

So you ve got your contract?
Congratulations!

Matt24
05-08-2010, 18:50
[quote=Matt24;707750]

Does that involve nanotech stuff? I did an OU course which had a very interesting nanotech section (apart from the maths - I fkcuing hate maths).

The future is very, very small.......

We can do nano (...probably), we can do micro, we can do mini - we're kinda known for VVS - as you put it very very small, (are you part of the game already?) - we have had some good wins in micro coatings for smart-chemo-delivery, and we often mess around with lubricants - (but heh we're still relatively young and our personalities don't allow us to get too many dates)...I'm quite good at maths but rubbish at people, I figure you win cos all the maths has been done and now the industry needs people people, c'mon in the waters lovely

Gypsy
05-08-2010, 19:32
Seems they are smart enough to get in :)
Are you?

Beat me to it.

Gypsy
05-08-2010, 19:38
.......but the country really hasn't made much of an impact on the world in hundreds of years. If you mean it has not successfully invaded anyone, true enough but the french impact on science, health care, social legislation and particularly town and city planning, water and sanitation etc is huge. I would agree that they are not exciting or eye catching maybe but they have made a huge impact on the world.


And there's nothing particularly charming about the stereotypical French attitude and mentality. What is the stereotypical French attitude? I've lived there 10 years and I really don't know.

mk182
05-08-2010, 23:22
Oh God that's funny!! Can't keep LOL :D Where did you get that grim picture?

Well, don't get me wrong. I do enjoy Russia. I mean I must for only earning 40,000 Roubles a month. But this is some of the crap that has actually been spewed out of the mouth of my girlfriend and other people I care about here.

They all talk to fondly of their overworked and very dead father figures, who even though went to bed after taking a vodka bath every night, were without a doubt real men!

On a side note, anyone want to hire me? :P

martpark
05-08-2010, 23:36
1. What country are you from?I was born in England, grew up in America, came here from Barcelona.

Did you have any connections with Russia before moving to Russia?
Back in the day we had a slightly mad friend who was the son of a preacher man, A Russian Orthodox preacher man in America. He announced one Friday night there was a Russian party and we were invited. So about 6 of us piled into an old American clunker and headed off. About 2 hours later, as we passed the entering New York State sign, we veered off down a dirt road. Suddenly a large triumphant gate appeared above us in the barren darkness. It was in Russian and I assume it said 'Welcome'.

There was a camp-like compound in the middle of the woods and Russian and American dance hits were blaring out of the barn. We went inside and everyone was speaking Russian and enjoying themselves as only Russians can. We, the 5 non-Russian speakers looked a bit lost but soon joined in. But truth be told what really struck us was this girl who was dancing. She was doing classical ballet moves and square dancing at the same time. Our 'troupe' was a bit mesmerised and we sat around in stunned bemusement. I've never seen anything like it since and it showed me that in America people can celebrate their customs and culture and no one really knows much about them.


2. How did you end up in Russia? I got a job teaching IB English. How long has it been now? 2 years

3. What do you do for a living in Russia? I now teach business people.

4. Do you speak Russian? I'm fluent in the basics. How well immersed in Russian society would you say you are? I try to learn the customs and read the lit. I have a quite a few Russian friends.

5. Do you think you'll stay in Russia for the rest of your life or is this just a temporary thing? I'll probably do a few months here, a few months there. The future is unwritten.

MickeyTong
06-08-2010, 00:15
[QUOTE=trancophile;707902]Net, I'm only on 100,000 rubies a month. QUOTE]

How do you people get these jobs?










I'm beginning to regret my misspent youth.



And my misspent early adulthood.


And my misspent middle age.

........I can see a pattern taking shape here.....

tvadim133
06-08-2010, 00:30
100 000 rur per month NET?

It is quite good, but could be better!

waxyweller
06-08-2010, 00:40
What an immigration interogation..:question: Not sure i wanna answer !:zoom:

tvadim133
06-08-2010, 00:42
What an immigration interogation..:question: Not sure i wanna answer !:zoom:

Why? Just normal questions, to my mind, asked by the expat as well!

Kraven Morehead
06-08-2010, 01:23
Well, don't get me wrong. I do enjoy Russia. I mean I must for only earning 40,000 Roubles a month. But this is some of the crap that has actually been spewed out of the mouth of my girlfriend and other people I care about here.

They all talk to fondly of their overworked and very dead father figures, who even though went to bed after taking a vodka bath every night, were without a doubt real men!

On a side note, anyone want to hire me? :P

I had some fun in the Ukraine. Some Ukrainian guy challenged me to a drinking competition in vodka (rugby player). I said sure, bring out the spoons. He brought out a big soup spoon and thought we were drinking from the spoon and was laughing at me being a foreigner. He was not laughing after he was told that it was sniffing shots of vodka off of the spoons.
He lost after one shot. They told that I am crazy.