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franzewich
09-07-2010, 01:18
Guys, maybe you can help me: I got me some inliners recently, and I'm having a great deal of fun! The only thing that doesn't work very gracefully, yet, is to slow down and stop. :groan:

So far, and with the help of the internet, I tried several techniques with various results. :5387: And after I nearly killed the dachshund of an obnoxious old lady in the park (but it was clearly the dog's fault!) I really started to wonder, what your favorite stopping techniques are? So, I'm sure you guys made some valuable experiences since you started. Would you share them with me? Your advice would be greatly celebrated! :celebrate:

And once I know how to stop properly, maybe a bunch of us could get together for a fun skating afternoon?

mattology
09-07-2010, 07:48
I don't even know a good stopping technique, but I would suppose that the best way to stop immediately is to try and change direction abruptly.

I also think that putting your feet into a T-Position, meaning that e.g. your left foot stays straight, while your right foot is set 90 degrees to your left foot is a very popular and effective braking technique.

I mostly use the brake itself on my right skate, but that takes a while until you've come to a stop. Therefore it is very important to look forward and be aware of any dangerous situations that might need you to stop.

I would definitely be in for a skating afternoon!

franzewich
09-07-2010, 08:27
... I also think that putting your feet into a T-Position, meaning that e.g. your left foot stays straight, while your right foot is set 90 degrees to your left foot is a very popular and effective braking technique.

I mostly use the brake itself on my right skate, but that takes a while until you've come to a stop. Therefore it is very important to look forward and be aware of any dangerous situations that might need you to stop.

I would definitely be in for a skating afternoon!

Yes, I am working on that, putting one skater in a 90° angle to the direction of travel; actually, I'm using my left leg - maybe I should follow your advice and use my right one! ;) ;) ;)

I favor that at lower speeds, to come to a complete stop, but this also tends to get me slightly off track. Besides, my body really has to be really warmed up before I can use that – too stiff and immobile otherwise. Maybe practice will help! :9456:

I should be in Moscow for a weekend end July - I will PM you for a skating event!

yakspeare
09-07-2010, 09:23
the brak pads aern't that useful...and you will quickly go through them if you use them a lot but they are ok for slowing you down but not really stopping....at slow to mid speeds the T stop, as suggested, is best...the first way of performing it isn't so hard but watch your centre of gravity before you do as you will swing around quite violently and can risk falling backwards with your momentum still trying to push you forwards ...so you need to brace and make sure your knees are bent and alsmot go into a crouch....

another technique which is harder to master is to do like you are about to t stop but to just drag one skate, you wont spin around and stop on a dime but this is the best way to slow down rather than the brake...it is difficult to master though as you will probably put down too much pressure at first and do a t stop when you dont want one....you will need good balance and be capable of skating on one leg to do this.....you should practice your balance by skating then lifting one knee up for 3-5 seconds and going only on one leg, then return to normal skating then do the other leg....once you get confident in your balance on both legs you can skate a LOT faster and perform this slow stopping technique....one of the things i recommend is ice skating lessons...even just a few and you will be able to apply these techniques on the road.

hope i have been of help.

franzewich
09-07-2010, 09:50
... but watch your centre of gravity before you do as you will swing around quite violently and can risk falling backwards with your momentum still trying to push you forwards ...so you need to brace and make sure your knees are bent and alsmot go into a crouch....

... and don't worry about that! I am already mastering the technique of flying backwards into the various samples of local botany! Rose bushes are wonderful to remind you of the essence of life - which is sometimes painful, too! ;) ;) ;)

I do appreciate you comment, though, thanks again!

FlakeySnowballer
09-07-2010, 15:00
Guys, maybe you can help me: I got me some inliners recently, and I'm having a great deal of fun! The only thing that doesn't work very gracefully, yet, is to slow down and stop. :groan:

So far, and with the help of the internet, I tried several techniques with various results. :5387: And after I nearly killed the dachshund of an obnoxious old lady in the park (but it was clearly the dog's fault!) I really started to wonder, what your favorite stopping techniques are? So, I'm sure you guys made some valuable experiences since you started. Would you share them with me? Your advice would be greatly celebrated! :celebrate:

And once I know how to stop properly, maybe a bunch of us could get together for a fun skating afternoon?

Kant.ru

mrgospodin
09-07-2010, 15:14
... and don't worry about that! I am already mastering the technique of flying backwards into the various samples of local botany! Rose bushes are wonderful to remind you of the essence of life - which is sometimes painful, too! ;) ;) ;)

I do appreciate you comment, though, thanks again!

i am also practicing to stop on roller skates. i felt down last week and hurt my left elbow. it was my mistake not to wear the complete protection kit. using the T-technique to stop requires a hell of a practice. i use zig-zag turns but big turns by shifting my weight left & right, it slows me down but not immediately.

gimme a yell when you are around, we can practice together in a small group of newbies!

FlakeySnowballer
09-07-2010, 15:14
I am very curious do you use knee caps and elbow caps with a helmet?

Matt24
09-07-2010, 15:25
on the one occasion I tried, I used a technique little known outside of France called 'Le piling into a Peugeot 407', later I tried the grabbing at car handles manoeuvre and to my shame passing baby buggies, by far the most effective method however, was being body checked by the father of the child whose baby buggy I had employed earlier.

Don't drink and skate is my advice, and I wish you luck, you might have to go quite some distance before you spot a Peugeot 407 in Moscow town, so I won't be too offended if you listen to the advice of others as well.

Matt

franzewich
09-07-2010, 16:25
i am also practicing to stop on roller skates. i felt down last week and hurt my left elbow. it was my mistake not to wear the complete protection kit. using the T-technique to stop requires a hell of a practice. i use zig-zag turns but big turns by shifting my weight left & right, it slows me down but not immediately.

gimme a yell when you are around, we can practice together in a small group of newbies!

I really learned to never (never ever!) skate without my wrist protectors! Then comes knee and ellbow protectors. The helmet, I admit, I don't wear when it's extremely hot.

Allright, why don't you PM me if you are interested in joining in - then I will tell you when I'm around (I'm not 100% sure, yet). Might be fun to learn from each other! :) :) :)

MickeyTong
09-07-2010, 17:18
on the one occasion I tried, I used a technique little known outside of France called 'Le piling into a Peugeot 407', later I tried the grabbing at car handles manoeuvre and to my shame passing baby buggies, by far the most effective method however, was being body checked by the father of the child whose baby buggy I had employed earlier.

Don't drink and skate is my advice, and I wish you luck, you might have to go quite some distance before you spot a Peugeot 407 in Moscow town, so I won't be too offended if you listen to the advice of others as well.

Matt

The coccyx-bounce-and-slide manoeuvre always works for me, and it's an independent technique, not requiring the intervention of other peoples' Dads.

franzewich
12-07-2010, 14:10
At the moment I'm working on another thechnique, which I found quite useful at every speed:

Doing the “wedge”. Since I'm a skier, that technique comes rather easy to me. But I don't know about people who don't ski? :question:

You kind of bend your knees inward, so that both skaters come to a slight angle to the direction of travel. By adding weight to your knees you can considerably slow down. The good thing is: you still can steer very well by shifting more weight to one leg.

Trouble is to not touch the skaters, otherwise you come to an abrupt halt.

Anybody familiar with this method?

mrgospodin
12-07-2010, 15:43
Last winter I went to Sochi/Adler with couple of friends and I did skiing for the first time! My friend from USA can ski brilliantly and taught me this technique also known as "snow plow". It really helps to slow down both on skis and roller skates. This technique trembles me when in high speed! I tried taking turns which also slows me down but i can't take smaller/sharp turns which i have seen people doing.

I took the advise from franzewich to put on the protection kit, thanks.


At the moment I'm working on another thechnique, which I found quite useful at every speed:

Doing the “wedge”. Since I'm a skier, that technique comes rather easy to me. But I don't know about people who don't ski? :question:

You kind of bend your knees inward, so that both skaters come to a slight angle to the direction of travel. By adding weight to your knees you can considerably slow down. The good thing is: you still can steer very well by shifting more weight to one leg.

Trouble is to not touch the skaters, otherwise you come to an abrupt halt.

Anybody familiar with this method?

franzewich
12-07-2010, 15:59
Last winter I went to Sochi/Adler with couple of friends and I did skiing for the first time! My friend from USA can ski brilliantly and taught me this technique also known as "snow plow". It really helps to slow down both on skis and roller skates. This technique trembles me when in high speed! I tried taking turns which also slows me down but i can't take smaller/sharp turns which i have seen people doing.

I took the advise from franzewich to put on the protection kit, thanks.

Yes, I also know this technique as "snow plough" ("Schneepflug"). Usually for beginners, until you learn the parallel-swing. It still comes in handy when there is no space to swing, e.g. when you are approaching the queue at the ski lift a little too fast. :9456:

I heard that on inline skaters you can also abruptly put both skates in a 90 degree angle to the direction of travel, like stopping on skis. But so far I have been too much of a chicken to try that one! ;)

Anybody (successfully!) done that?

FatAndy
12-07-2010, 16:21
Franzewich,
there are several ways to stop on rolls:
http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-139/article-520.html

Standard brake usage (located at the back of right boot) is most convenient and easy to do if you're beginner.
http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-294.html

Then upon experience you should move to snake-way and T-stop:
http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-551.html

When you're profi, do power slide and parallel stop - same as T-stop but both skates parallel.
http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-551.html - same article, points 9 and 10

http://www.roller.ru/content/school/ - worth to read about general technics

Everything in Russian of course

franzewich
12-07-2010, 16:42
Franzewich, ... Everything in Russian of course

Don't worry - my Russian is about as good as my (still poor!) inline skills! ;)

Strider
12-07-2010, 17:17
I was about to give you links, but FatAndy did it already :)

they have really good tips on how to do it and not to do it...

but from my experience... T-break... it is very dangerous when your speed is high...

I think safest is V-break... you can't possibly fall doing it, even at high speed... and when you slow down a little bit you can try something else... I make a right turn, causing my left leg to slide... it takes practice, but this is the fastest way to stop for me...

btw, on iceskates I can only slide by moving my right left forward, not left one... you should try both ways to find which is better for you

but it's better to avoid situations when you need to make an emergency stop, going around an obstacle is a better way, and keep track of everything that happens ahead of you... people, animals, cars and etc

franzewich
12-07-2010, 17:29
...
but from my experience... T-break... it is very dangerous when your speed is high...

Yes, I tried that once even at moderate speed and almost bought the ticket ...


but it's better to avoid situations when you need to make an emergency stop, going around an obstacle is a better way, and keep track of everything that happens ahead of you... people, animals, cars and etc

I try sticking to that motto, too - but the stupid dachshund ...

My advice: keep away from animals and from children - and from old women chatting! (and from pretty girls, when you are on skates - they are too distractive!) ;) ;) ;)

franzewich
13-07-2010, 01:40
I am very curious do you use knee caps and elbow caps with a helmet?

Sorry Flake, your question somehow slipped my attention :( Yes, I always do! Because:

1) I am not unsportive, but I'm not the most athletic and balanced guy - too much weight around my waist at the moment.

2) There is always a surprise reason to fall, besides own inadequacy: Inattentive people, children, animals, a hole in the grond, a twig, a leaf, spilled ice cream, you name it. Also distraction: a sexy girl (pardon, in your case: a sexy guy!), etc. Some things simply are beyond your control!

3) I keep seeing real good skaters, who wear the entire gear! Most omit the helmet, but you really never know what part of your body hits the ground first.

4) When learning a new sport, one tends to push the limits (at least I tend to). When you've gone over it, falls are likely! So if you really want to learn, be prepared!

It is, of course, up to everybody to protect their bodies or not. But I follow the motto: "Better safe :) than sorry :( !"

FatAndy
13-07-2010, 12:53
I follow the motto: "Better safe than sorry !" - yes, asfalt disease is very unpleasant thing.

FatAndy
14-07-2010, 12:38
BTW, there are free roller.ru lessons for novices at Poklonka every Sunday around 16:00 (m. Park Pobedy, GPW memorial complex at Poklonnaya Gora, right allee from metro, instrustors wait for novices at benches at the beginning of allee).
Also there are more advanced courses/groups for speedskaters, slalomists and FSK.

franzewich
14-07-2010, 14:11
BTW, there are free roller.ru lessons for novices at Poklonka every Sunday around 16:00 (m. Park Pobedy, GPW memorial complex at Poklonnaya Gora, right allee from metro, instrustors wait for novices at benches at the beginning of allee).
Also there are more advanced courses/groups for speedskaters, slalomists and FSK.

Thank you for that info! It is recommendable to get some professional to show you how to improve - saves time.

Too bad I'm not living in Moscow at the moment! :(

FatAndy
14-07-2010, 19:45
Franzewich, don't worry - they do it Apr till Oct end. If you fit into this timeframe, welcome there.
If not, you can browse websites www.roller.ru and www.speedskater.ru
They also have forums, there are links dropped everywhere in threads, to clips/movies with elements/roller community runs (pokatushki) invitations/reports etc.
http://www.roller.ru/newforum/
and http://speedskater.ru/forum/

This can help you to get more experience of other people.

There are also similar websites in SPb and other cities of Russia and CIS:
http://www.roller.ru/content/communicate/article-415.html

Also in Moscow exist novice runs through the city in that timeframe - China-town (from Russian slang "чайник" - novice, this run starts usually from Gorky Park entrance) and ГОРН (ГОРод Новичков, from different places) where instrustors (with special back-supporting assistants and traffic stopping assistants) select interesting but easy routes for novices to let them practice in the city movements, teach them safety/security techniques, tips, tricks etc.

When you'll be back to Moscow and will be still interested, drop me PM, I'll try to point "fishy places".;)

http://www.rollerov.net/main_file.php/Chronicles/47/ - BTW there is a skate-park in Warsaw, called Jutrzenka - see photos from Minsk website about their visit to. They mentioned that Warsaw is not suited for plain rollers, only for aggressive runs, but "das ist aber zuviel" - I understand them - their native Minsk is real heaven for all-types-of-rollers... ;)

franzewich
19-07-2010, 15:52
So ... who's up for a skating run this weekend, say Sunday afternoon? Provided the weather holds out! It has considerably cooled off in Warsaw.

I'll be in Moscow - would be great if we could exchange our experiences in person!

PM me if you're interested!

See you then!

franzewich
31-07-2010, 13:35
Hi Guys,

early this morning in the Pole Mokotowskie Park I discovered another GREAT stopping technique:

1) Try to somehow jump over this stupid and obnoxiously long dog leash which spans across the way (elderly woman on one end, doberman pinscher on the other). Yelling does not help! :devil:
2) Land on one skater, while the other one is veering off to the side. :9456:
3) Try to regain your balance after your center of gravity has mercilessly shifted backwards, wildly rowing your arms. :mml:
4) Hit the soft muddy grass (it has been heavily raining in Warsaw last night - beautiful cool temperature, yet sunshine!) :sunny:
5) Don't worry - your legs will come to a very abrupt stop, whilst your body is being flung forward. :applause:
6) Land first on your hands, ellbows, knees; then, due to still active inertia, your hands slip on the gr**** and your face is submerged into the mud. So is your brand-new white t-shirt with a cool Japanese phrase on it, saying, maybe, "Take life easy and don't rush ..." or something like that. :ok:
7) Spit out the mud, clean the dirt out of your nose and your ears.
8) Find your glasses! They must be somewhere around you!
9) Finally, escape the crowd of retired women who think you're dead, or hope otherwise that you desperately need their help, while you're doing, in fact, just fine.

All that is hurt is your pride. But as a "real man" (or a "tough girl"!) you can live with that! :respect:

FatAndy
31-07-2010, 14:49
Cool. You've caught two of frequent situations described at roller.ru - dog leash and stopping "v gazon". But it's also experience ;) I did it several times and probably will do in future... :D

BTW consider contact lenses instead of "glass glasses". For protection of whole eyes and surrounding areas againist dust, wind, rain and small stones our guys use 3M industrial ones, made of strong polycarbonate:
http://www.technoavia.ru/katalog/siz/glasses/3m_gl/

Matt24
31-07-2010, 14:53
Hi Guys,

early this morning in the Pole Mokotowskie Park I discovered another GREAT stopping technique:

1) Try to somehow jump over this stupid and obnoxiously long dog leash which spans across the way (elderly woman on one end, doberman pinscher on the other). Yelling does not help! :devil:
2) Land on one skater, while the other one is veering off to the side. :9456:
3) Try to regain your balance after your center of gravity has mercilessly shifted backwards, wildly rowing your arms. :mml:
4) Hit the soft muddy grass (it has been heavily raining in Warsaw last night - beautiful cool temperature, yet sunshine!) :sunny:
5) Don't worry - your legs will come to a very abrupt stop, whilst your body is being flung forward. :applause:
6) Land first on your hands, ellbows, knees; then, due to still active inertia, your hands slip on the gr**** and your face is submerged into the mud. So is your brand-new white t-shirt with a cool Japanese phrase on it, saying, maybe, "Take life easy and don't rush ..." or something like that. :ok:
7) Spit out the mud, clean the dirt out of your nose and your ears.
8) Find your glasses! They must be somewhere around you!
9) Finally, escape the crowd of retired women who think you're dead, or hope otherwise that you desperately need their help, while you're doing, in fact, just fine.

All that is hurt is your pride. But as a "real man" (or a "tough girl"!) you can live with that! :respect:

Funny!

franzewich
12-08-2010, 01:43
I discovered a new “stopping technique”, i.e. I only observed it. Haven’t tried it, yet – I’m lacking the guts for that one! :shame:

I observed it early Sunday morning. The pavement in the park was still partially damp and wet from the previous night’s heavy thunderstorms. I did realize that the rolls lacked the good grip as on a dry surface. :duhhhh:

So that dude came zooming by and went into a rather sharp turn – usually no problem! But there was a small shallow puddle!

I saw the water splashing, and somehow his one skater must have sought it own direction outwards. In any case, the guy’s legs did the perfect splits, and his body made kind of a backward 180 degree twist. According to his facial expression – a mixture of surprise and horror! – he had not done this intentionally. :eek: Looked quite spectacular, though, from the distance!

When he hit the asphalt with his butt (physicians call that, I think, “coccyx “, or “tailbone”), his face changed to “ultimate pain”. His “tailbone” must be a couple of millimeters shorter now - poor guy! I helped him up, but stopping in that stupid puddle was really NOT easy! And after that incident his skating style appeared not as elegant as before; somehow “stiffer”.

So, my advice is, avoid damp or wet spots, if you can! If you can’t, especially in a curve, pray to the “Holy Coccyx”! :bowdown: