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cyprusjeff
05-05-2005, 20:44
Today at Stavropol MVD HQ I had my Temporary Residency stamp, valid for 3 years, entered into my UK Passport, exactly 4 and a half months since my application papers were accepted by the said HQ.
Tomorrow I apply for my 3 year multi-exit/entry visa, a simple procedure so I am lead to believe.
If anyone else is contemplating going down this road then please ask, privately or publicly, and I will help in whatever way I am able.
Regards,
Jeff Gordon.

Bels
05-05-2005, 21:27
Congratulations, that's what I want also , I am married to a Russian woman , and we want a normal family life in Russia, it is a pain me coming back to UK and renewing my personal invitation visa. It is a pain waiting for the invitation and then having the expense of it by DHL. Especially if you lose your passport on what the invitation was applied for. I just want a normal life in Russia with my wife, and our young son. We can work and have a lifeif it wasn't for Russian red tape to allow us to get on with it.

This police check , in the UK, its a pain, the purpose is to protect our rights under some data protection act, there are problems, Russian post is dreadful, faxing allowed but they must be sure that I personally receive it , My wife has a fax service at the company she works with, not good enough, they will check that I am the one to receive it . How do I get round this. Also the police will not state such facts as I am a good citizen, just that their are presumably no records of misconduct.

Being resident to a western region of Moscow means that i have to visit a large numbert of clinics for medical checks, I have been informed that it is easier central Moscow , where one clinic deals with all medical checks, but thats not where I am resident.

I heard of someone on expat.ru who got a letter from British embassy stating it was impossible to get proper police clearance due to its regulations, and it was accepted, is this true

PJB
06-05-2005, 03:33
I am in awe! I can't get up the nerve or energy to face the red tape. My wedding to my Russian husband was preceded by months of stupid paperwork and trips to Moscow government offices that were always closed for lunch or holidays.

jl321
06-05-2005, 09:27
[QUOTE=cyprusjeff]
Tomorrow I apply for my 3 year multi-exit/entry visa, a simple procedure so I am lead to believe.
QUOTE]

Please let us know if you got this 3 year multi-exit/entry visa. I have had a temporary residency for neraly a year and Central Ovir (Moscow) insists that I can only get a one-time use exit/entry permit. I have had to do this four times already. Each time I argue and each time I am denied. They insist that such a multiple entry visa does not exist for temporary residents. Good luck to you though. Again, please post if you get such a visa.

Molotok
06-05-2005, 15:02
cyprusjeff,
It would be good to know, first of all, how you obtained the documentation from your native country - I mean the police record. Did you do it at home or via your embassy here?
Also, how did you prove you have the finances to support your stay here? With bank statements from home? And if so, did you need to get them notarized/translated?
Also, did you apply on a 3-month private visa? And if so, did you have to leave the country to renew it before receiving the temp residency?
Please PM me if you like.
Congratulations, by the way.

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 17:49
Bels,
I too have a Russian wife and like you, I wanted a 'normal' life here in Russia without the nausea and expense of having to leave every 3 months to renew my Private Invitation.
Unlike you I did not have to get my police-record document from the UK authorities. I lived in Cyprus for 12 years prior to my deciding to move to Russia to live and I obtained my police record document from the Cypriot authorities. My BIGGEST mistake was in not getting that document apostiled!
Essentuki Immigration told me that it was not required, getting it apostiled, but when my application went to the Region HQ in Stavropol they had different ideas and told me, in no uncertain words, that it WAS required.
My wife and I took a hurried trip to the Cyprus Embassy in Moscow to see if they could assist, but they were worse than useless and told me that I would have to revisit Cyprus to sort it out. That of course would have expired the visa I was then staying on.
I thus made a visit to the British Embassy in Moscow to see if they were able to assist me and, to my delight, they provided me with their standard 'no police record that we are aware of' document that I paid 1600 roubles for.
Armed with this document I revisited Stavropol Immigration only to be told that this British Embassy document required authenticating by the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs!!!!!!!!!
Another trip to Moscow, quite a few roubles in the correct pocket and I got this document authenticated!
The British Embassy, by the way, who have been issuing this police-record document for years were quite amazed when I told them that their document required authentification, first time they had heard of this.
If you go down this route then do get EVERYTHING apostiled.

Regarding the medical checks, I do not know the Moscow set-up but here in Essentuki we have just the one clinic that you visit to get your health checks regarding HIV, TB and sexually transmitted diseases plus another office you must visit regarding your freedom from illegal drugs use.
After you get your clearance certificates from each of these doctors then a panel sits, at which you attend, where if all is in order you are given an overall health clearance certificate which is the document that the Immigration people require.

Hope this helps, please do feel free to ask if any other points or matters of procedure are troubling you.
Regards,
Jeff.

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 18:08
cyprusjeff,
It would be good to know, first of all, how you obtained the documentation from your native country - I mean the police record. Did you do it at home or via your embassy here?
Also, how did you prove you have the finances to support your stay here? With bank statements from home? And if so, did you need to get them notarized/translated?
Also, did you apply on a 3-month private visa? And if so, did you have to leave the country to renew it before receiving the temp residency?
Please PM me if you like.
Congratulations, by the way.

Molotok,
I think my reply to Bels answers your question regarding the police check, please see my reply above.

Regarding finances.
I am retired, have been for 12 years now, and live on a British Army Officers's Pension. I provided my latest pension statement as one of the documents that comprised my application. I had the document translated and notarized here in Russia. I also made sure that my wife's bank account was in a very healthy state ;)

Until yesterday I was on a 3 month private visa. I did NOT have to leave the country before receiving my Temporary Residency.
Today I got my Temporary Residency registered at my local Immigration office here in Essentuki. I am now registered until 3 May 2006 and on or before that date will either re-register or apply for Permanent Residency.

Molotok
06-05-2005, 18:15
Thanks. It's really good of you to take the time to explain things. Just one little query... did they extend your 3-month visa while you were applying?
Thanks again, and by the way, what's life like down there in Stavropol?

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 18:28
Thanks. It's really good of you to take the time to explain things. Just one little query... did they extend your 3-month visa while you were applying?
Thanks again, and by the way, what's life like down there in Stavropol?

Only too happy to help. :)

They did NOT extend my 3 month private visa whilst I was waiting for my Temporary Residency to come through. I had to leave the country, go to the UK and obtain yet another private visa :happymad:

They used to extend your visa whilst you waited for your residency to be approved but in July 2004 that regulation was scrubbed!

Today is bright and sunny, spring has at last arrived.
Yesterday I drove for 10 hours, to and from Stavropol, through some of the most torrential rain that it has been my pleasure to ever have experienced!

Regards,
Jeff.

PJB
06-05-2005, 18:51
Is it necessary to be in country on a private visa or can the temp resident permit be obtained while on a business visa?

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 20:26
Is it necessary to be in country on a private visa or can the temp resident permit be obtained while on a business visa?

Of that I am not sure!
Most certainly, when you APPLY for Temporary Residency you MUST be on a Private Visa.
Do not know the rules appertaining as to what visa you can be on when the Residency comes through though?
I was on a Private Visa when I applied and when it came through, not the same visa but private on both occasions.

Regards,

equalizer
06-05-2005, 21:12
need to ask ,did you consider russian citizenship or ask about it ,if yes what was the critrea,this is something i have been considering for a while but always get told a different story

equalizer
06-05-2005, 21:16
just noticed your location a little bit more ,are you stavrapol or esentukki

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 22:54
need to ask ,did you consider russian citizenship or ask about it ,if yes what was the critrea,this is something i have been considering for a while but always get told a different story

Citizenship I did consider but dismissed the idea almost immediately.
I would not, under any circumstance, replace my British passport with a Russian one and I do not believe that dual citizenship is an option that is available although I stand to be corrected?

I wish to live and set-up home here for various reasons and Temporary Residency followed by Permanent Residency would appear to meet all my requirements. To come and go as I require without the hassle of obtaining visas on a regular basis plus, being a British passport holder, most countries of the world offer free, non-visa access.

I have not investigated the matter fully but these are my thoughts gathered from the rumours I have heard.

Regards,

cyprusjeff
06-05-2005, 23:01
just noticed your location a little bit more ,are you stavrapol or esentukki

Hi,
I have my home in Essentuki, Stavropolski krai. Stavropol City is some 200 kilometres away by road, normally a 2 and a half hour drive but currently, with the main motorway at Nevinomissk impassable due to flooding, some 4 hours drive away.

Regards,

Bels
06-05-2005, 23:35
[QUOTE=cyprusjeff]
Tomorrow I apply for my 3 year multi-exit/entry visa, a simple procedure so I am lead to believe.
QUOTE]

Please let us know if you got this 3 year multi-exit/entry visa. I have had a temporary residency for neraly a year and Central Ovir (Moscow) insists that I can only get a one-time use exit/entry permit. I have had to do this four times already. Each time I argue and each time I am denied. They insist that such a multiple entry visa does not exist for temporary residents. Good luck to you though. Again, please post if you get such a visa.

Bit confused with the above. My purposes of applying for residential is so that you have no need of a visa anymore, that you can work or be self employed without the need of a work permit, and no dependance of one employer, if the employer is unsuitable then he can be changed. And that you can settle in Russia without worry of renewing outside the country.

If you want to jet backwards and forth to other countries then perhaps just stick to multi entry visa

Theres no way I would want to go for Russian citizenship, hopefully restrictions doesnt apply for permanent residence when the time comes. Cant imagine any Brit wanting to lose there citizenship.

equalizer
07-05-2005, 00:26
my inlaws and my daughter pop down there quite often for the health spas or sanitoriums whatever they are called and say its great,i myself was a little hesitant as i wasnt sure if i would like it or not ,how do you find life there .
and i for would happily swap my uk passport for a russian one,lived here since 94 and it is a pain ,doing this visa every year ,and i travel a lot to arabic states where having a russian passport is a lot less hasstle.

jl321
07-05-2005, 11:47
[QUOTE=jl321]

Bit confused with the above. My purposes of applying for residential is so that you have no need of a visa anymore, that you can work or be self employed without the need of a work permit, and no dependance of one employer, if the employer is unsuitable then he can be changed. And that you can settle in Russia without worry of renewing outside the country.

If you want to jet backwards and forth to other countries then perhaps just stick to multi entry visa

Theres no way I would want to go for Russian citizenship, hopefully restrictions doesnt apply for permanent residence when the time comes. Cant imagine any Brit wanting to lose there citizenship.


With a temporary residency permit you are still required to have entry and exit visas. It is the old green paper visa with both the exit and entry visa on it. They are obtained prior to leaving Russia. It takes several days and the hassle of going to OVIR to submit the papers and then pick up the visa. It is not hard but it takes time and is a real inconvenience.

Visa free travel is only possible with the permanent residency (Vid na Zhitalstvo). Youcan apply for this one year after obtaining the temp permit.

Eric Lyle
11-05-2005, 21:29
I was thinking about doing the same thing, but was told that I need to be "propisanii" here in order to do that. In other words be a partial owner of a flat in Moscow. Was this true in your case? Thanks. Eric

cyprusjeff
11-05-2005, 22:29
I was thinking about doing the same thing, but was told that I need to be "propisanii" here in order to do that. In other words be a partial owner of a flat in Moscow. Was this true in your case? Thanks. Eric

I do own an apartment in Essentuki with my wife and the ownership document was included in my submission for Temporary Residency.

However, as I understand it, ownership of property is only mandatory when applying for Permanent Residency.

Regards,
Jeff

resident
13-05-2005, 20:22
I'm glad that finally so many people are waking up and have the balls to go for residency. Mine (& my kids') came through a year ago. To clear up a few myths (from my experience):

1) Police letter - by bending arms at the Brit Emb - who can issue a (meaningless) letter, saying to the best of their knowledge...they have no information to say that...(I think there is a 15 charge too) AND by getting on well with the OVIR guys, this letter saves you the MASSIVE PAIN IN THE A*** of getting letters from the UK (a road I think we should all resist - the same as the apostil vs notarised translation farce- never get apostlil if it can be avoided)

2) Visa - you get a 3 year visa for SINGLE EXIT & ENTRY, meaning yuo can leave any time you want, then come back in, BUT when you come back then you need to get another one (350 RR, form to fill in). The way to simplify this is to scan the forms (incl sberbank ones) and sign a power of aturney to your secretary (if you have one).

3) You get 2 stamps in your passport - one leave to stay for 3 years, the other a registration (almost propiska !) for 1 year (renewable each year). These are the justification for you being in the country (not the visa any more). The visa you get (if you want) is simply a right to cross the border.

4) When you have these stamps you can even get a pensions card - meaning that if your company pays into a pension fund (by law), that money is ear-marked for you (and doesn't just disappear, although this is being optimistic !)

5) You can get into museums etc at the "residents" price, possibly passport line for russian citizens & residents etc. Also when you need to notarise anything you are "registered at..." (people on normal visas are, in the eyes of notaries, tourist types in limbo, who "arrived, according to what they (unconfirmed) say.."). Its pedantic but pleasant to feel you're finally resident!!

Bels
13-05-2005, 23:00
Thank you Cyprus Jeff and Resident for an informative and useful contribution in getting a Temporary and eventually permanent Residential visa.

Of course one other popular benefit is being able to be employed without the dependance of one employer having to issue a work permit, as you will have the right to work, and if you wish to be self employed in Russia or in other words do business in Russia, it makes life a lot easier. Like my Russian wife and I want to work privately together as EFL Teachers

resident
15-05-2005, 18:28
Bels, you're right. However if I was in your shoes I think I'd start teaching without a permit. You're probably anyway not going to be declaring the income if its private lessons. Is your wife Russian ? If so you could claim she was doing the teaching & you helping her... until your papers come through.

jl321
27-05-2005, 11:34
Cypruss Jeff,

So did you ever actually get the multiple entry visa while holding a temproary residency permit, or did the stuick you with the one-time exit/entry visa we get here in Moscow? Please update us.

Thanks.

Moscow Wolf
27-05-2005, 12:31
Very informative if not a little confusing/conflicting information contained herein.

I spoke to the British Consul a month or so ago by telephone about this requirement for a 'Certificate of Good Conduct' from the Metropolitan Police as part of the process for 'Russian Residency and/or a Work Permit.

The Consul gave me a link to the Met Police web-site (www.met.police-uk/dataprotection) which I duly followed up. Basically, all you can get is a read out under the Subject Access Provisions of the Data Protection Act from the National Police computer. However, as the Met rightly point out, if you have never lived in the Metropolian Police region then you should apply to your local Police Force. All links to other UK regional Police Forces are provided. So of I go to the West Mercia Police web-site and download the forms required. Now in theory, I need to provide two forms of identity - copies of passport, driving license etc are acceptable if they are stamped by a solictor as being copies of the originals. OK fill out the forms, get your proof of identity, enclose cheque for J10 and bob's your uncle........... Only you have to wait upto 40 days for the print-out to be sent back to you.

Then, and here comes the grind, you have to get this 'Apostilised'. Now according to the Consul the only place I can get this done is at the Foreign and Commonwealth Legal Office at the Old Admiralty Building in London!! I assume that I have to take it there personally myself - although I haven't confirmed this yet so it all gets long winded and expensive flying home to get something apostilised.

The Consul never mentioned to me anything about a letter being available at the Embassy so this is news to me. As it stands, I have got around to completing the Police Forms and am about ready to send it to the UK. I know someone that is going there shortly and he will take it for me.

As regards the medical requirements - I did all those at the SOS Clinic, they just said that they didn't do the Leprosy part and that it wasn't required. As I did all those tests back in February, I'm not sure how long they remain valid for when applying for a visa, a work permit or residency. To live here legally as a foreigner is not easy, sometimes, I think it easier to be semi-legal. Sorry for the LONG thread, I couldn't find a shorter way to explain what I wanted to say.

equalizer
27-05-2005, 13:00
have done the appostilling part personally ,its a pain in the arse takes a while too.

resident
27-05-2005, 18:41
believe me, i got it that way. why waste your time and set a bad precedent for others ?

Bels
27-05-2005, 19:10
Moscow wolf is right, about the embasy not encouraging this letter, and some misunderstanding, I think the russian staff can get a little confused now and again, one lady told me that to receive this letter I must show the police report, I annoyingly told her that if I had the police report I would not be needing the letter.
The consul is just returning from holiday, I will wait till I can speak to him, I still want this letter. It wont be the first time I got wrong information. Like when I got married here, and they said my divorce paper must have a central office stamp from UK, and when I registered in Moscow marriage centre, I was informed it wasnt necessary.

cyprusjeff
27-05-2005, 19:16
Cypruss Jeff,

So did you ever actually get the multiple entry visa while holding a temproary residency permit, or did the stuick you with the one-time exit/entry visa we get here in Moscow? Please update us.

Thanks.

I go to Stavropol Immigration this coming Monday to pick up my new visa, I will let you know once I have it.
I hadn't forgotten that this point was still outstanding but a rotten cold these last couple of weeks had made going up to Stavropol out of the question.
I shall be unable to reply next week as, after Stavropol, I continue north on a birdwatching trip to Manych and the Volga Delta.
Will let you all know just as soon as I return to Essentuki.
Regards,

horilka
30-05-2005, 15:06
Does one have to be married to a Russian to get this?

Bels
30-05-2005, 15:39
I do believe this is one of the main qualifications to get a residential visa, however I have read that it is also possible by investing in the country, such as forming a company. more information on this subject on waytorussia.net

Perhaps other members can confirm this

Blackwidow
31-05-2005, 15:39
Daer Sirs,

I am one of a lucky few who have got and went through the pain. aggravation and insentives issue (!) to obtain residency here. But, as I intend to live, work and stay in Russia forever, I intend to get Citizenship....why you may ask, when Russia does not recognise Dual Citizenship (especially with foreigners) - simple really. I do not trust Russian beaurocrats...they change the rules too often (the residency Visa was 7 years, then 5 years and now 3 years...so what of the future? ONE YEAR). It took me ONE year and near deportation to get this despite being married to a Russian and having TWO Russian children and our own private owned flat!!! Problems apart......yes "IN THEORY" I will lose my British Citizenship (but only technically and from the Russian side :), though enough said.....as my son is testiment to the reality :))))).

I do believe however, IF you are so serious, honest (not here to escape from something or to scrounge from the Russian state) and really WANT to make this your home, you will 1). learn the language and take the exams 2). Get a decent job of Russian pay levels and 3). Get Russian citizenship. Otherwise (and you may not want to hear this) go back to the UK, USA, Africa, etc. and make this your home, with or without your Dura or Durok, as obviosuly life was so good and perfect to you there!!! I for one love Moscow, Russia and the People....but not the administration, but as one person once said Moscow is not Russia and the Administration is not he People! Times will change here and all the better for the future of my family....the corrupted will fall and sense will prevail.

resident
05-06-2005, 16:08
BlackWidow I salute you ! My 3 kids are in Russian schools, I own a city flat and a dacha, own my company. As mentioned in these columns I have residency. The reasons I won't go (at this stage) for citizenship is I know how easy it is to get people put away (arrested). Your sole foreign citizenship is still a protecting factor. Also I don't plan for my kids to do military service here. I know lots of CIS citizens who try to keep their feet in both camps, whilst having long-term plans here.

Lets discuss over a beer sometime !

Benedikt
05-06-2005, 20:30
re; police clearance in your homecountry..
i just sent an e-mail to the mayors office from the little town in austria where i came from.
they replied and in about 2 weeks time i had the paper (registered mail) at NO COST!!!!!!!!!!!
i am also in the process of obtaining residence and i tell you here in moscow it is quite a hassle.at least the clinics where to get all the tests are close together so i can manage in one day.
being a chef i have a 'medical book' that states that i have no tb, aids,and what not else. this official document is NOT accepted...
i must show proof that i have 1000 US $ in a bank here
and a few papers from my wife also...
it does help that i am working officially and not as a 'consultant'... and we have our own flat.
wish me luck!!!!!!!!!!!to get that paper soon..

Molotok
08-06-2005, 11:46
Regarding the letter of good conduct, I was at the Brit embassy today to find out if they could issue it. They were quite adamant that they are not authorised to do so and that I would have to go through my local police force. They did say, however, that they can translate and apostil the original letter for me here in Moscow.
I have found out that the medical tests have to be done at several different clinics or all at one particular clinic in the 'ogrug' of Moscow where I live.

I still have a few questions and would really appreciate any information.
1. Do the bank statements have to be from Russian banks and do they have to be notarised (apostiled) if they are from a foreign bank?
2. Is it just a copy of your latest bank statement(s) or a specific letter from the bank stating that you have the funds?
3. Would a Russian bank statement in my wife's name be enough?
Thanks.

cyprusjeff
09-06-2005, 21:58
Cypruss Jeff,

So did you ever actually get the multiple entry visa while holding a temproary residency permit, or did the stuick you with the one-time exit/entry visa we get here in Moscow? Please update us.

Thanks.

As you correctly said in a previous post, it's only single entry visas now!
As is usual in these parts, I was incorrectly informed by a staff member of the Immigration Service when I was told that I would get a multi-entry visa whilst holding a Temporary Residency Permit.
When I went to Stavropol last week to collect my visa, on seeing that it was single entry I queried why they had ceased to issue multi-entry visas. "We found it difficult to check how long a person on a Temporary Residency Permit had been out of Russia when we issued multi-entry visas. You can only be out of Russia a maximum of 6 months in any 12 months on a Temporary Residency Permit"
End of quote!
Regards,
Jeff Gordon.

resident
10-06-2005, 01:42
Jeff

I'm sure that you'd agree that this is the downside of being a resident. Have you thought of lobbying the immigration service ? Are there many others out there who would be prepared to send a letter if I can find out the appropriate person's (head of the immigration service) coordinates ? From personal experience such lobbying is surprisingly effective.

resident
10-06-2005, 01:45
Molotok

Did you ask for a letter from the embassy saying that its not their policy to issue such letters ? That's the one I used (successfully) to get my permit. The OVIR ticks boxes, they don't care what's written there !

Crazyeelboy
10-06-2005, 10:40
The reasons I won't go (at this stage) for citizenship is I know how easy it is to get people put away (arrested). Your sole foreign citizenship is still a protecting factor.

I agree with Resident. It simply has not been that long since the "bad old days" and there is no telling whether things might snap. While we all love Russia and the Russian people, taking Russian citizenship puts you under the full authority of the Russian state and the Russian government, which, as Black Widow pointed out is not the same as Russia or the Russian people.

I'd like to think that corruption will end and sense will prevail, but I'm not willing to bet everything on it. Perhaps one acid test for this is to poll your Russian friends. How many of them would switch passports with you? How many of them would give up UK (or US, or whatever) citizenship for Russian citizenship?

There are also a number of prosaic concerns to keep in mind, but this message is already too long as it is...

I'm not trying to throw cold water on anyone's dreams, I'm just saying that one should be very careful in making decisions like taking local citizenship.

cyprusjeff
10-06-2005, 21:57
Jeff

I'm sure that you'd agree that this is the downside of being a resident. Have you thought of lobbying the immigration service ? Are there many others out there who would be prepared to send a letter if I can find out the appropriate person's (head of the immigration service) coordinates ? From personal experience such lobbying is surprisingly effective.

You have more nerve than me, I must say:-)
For the time being I shall let sleeping dogs lie!
Sounds like a good idea but for me, having JUST received my residency, it must stay as that, an idea:-)

From a-not-wising-to-upset-the-applecart,

Jeff.

Rusty
13-06-2005, 15:50
Wow hard sorting through all this;

Ok so I have had a temp Residence for over a year and a half, got a multiple leave and return stamp (but have never left, so...), yes last spring so do not know if I will be required to get a single issue leave return permit now???

Also my residency case is to be decieded in 5 months from now (although my visa here is good till 2008?)

Question is as a resident (perm), can you get a multiple leave/entry, if so with what restrictions ?

My citizanship, has to stay USA, I will not give up my retirement money. Heard I can be a resident and keep my citizanship.

Of course I know I will figure it out, and it will change again, arrrr

cyprusjeff
13-06-2005, 17:55
Also my residency case is to be decieded in 5 months from now (although my visa here is good till 2008?)

Question is as a resident (perm), can you get a multiple leave/entry, if so with what restrictions ?

My citizanship, has to stay USA, I will not give up my retirement money. Heard I can be a resident and keep my citizanship.



I do not understand your first sentence, have you now applied for Permanent Residency after holding Temporary Residency for over 12 months?
That is what I intend doing.

Regarding your second sentence. As I understand it, once you have Permanent Residency you are entitled to come and go as you wish?

Regardless of what the rules might be, or may in the future be, I for one would not consider giving up my British citizenship!
Again, as I understand it, you may have Permanent Residency whilst keeping your current citizenship.

Regards,

Jeff.

Rusty
14-06-2005, 04:08
Sorry first sentance is just saying I did get a mutiple exit/entry visa, but was obtained last spring 2004, so is probable not good anymore (from what I read).

My perment statis will be decieded Feb 2006.

Thanks on the rest of your info., As it is what I wish, bulding a house here, and wish to spend (like 1/2 the year here, and 1/2 a year there).


I do not understand your first sentence.

Regarding your second sentence. As I understand it, once you have Permanent Residency you are entitled to come and go as you wish?

Again, as I understand it, you may have Permanent Residency whilst keeping your current citizenship.

Regards,

Jeff.

svelt
06-10-2007, 16:27
such an interesting thread. dont know how i never found it before... thanks jeff and others who have contributed. i also wish to go down the temp route but i am o longer married to a russian so getting the private visa is not soooooo easy. i live in moscow with early retirement by choice and like all you the hassle of visa renewal etc is still as big a pain as it was when i started in 95. i will continue reading but if anyone knows any reason why i should give in now let me know please. again thanks jeff

Clean32
06-10-2007, 17:10
such an interesting thread. dont know how i never found it before... thanks jeff and others who have contributed. i also wish to go down the temp route but i am o longer married to a russian so getting the private visa is not soooooo easy. i live in moscow with early retirement by choice and like all you the hassle of visa renewal etc is still as big a pain as it was when i started in 95. i will continue reading but if anyone knows any reason why i should give in now let me know please. again thanks jeff

i think you may be ok, the goalpost move from time to time but the basics are still the same.
can suport your self
Have a permanint registerd address
medicals
clean criminal history
and i think 3 years in RF and you can aplly your self

just head down to your local OVIR office and ask ?? easy

VladSkywolf
02-11-2007, 06:41
As I am currently going through this process now, I can confirm that the basics have pretty much remained the same.


Medicals (including HIV). This is a standard type consisting of various checks, so be sure to mention what you need this for and you will receive the proper medical document (assuming you've passed everything :)).
Criminal history record. According to our local OVIR, this MUST be Apostille'd
Bank statement (from Russian bank) showing a balance sufficient to support yourself for 3 years, according to minimum standard of living. We were told this amounts to 5000 rubles a month, or 180,000 rubles total, however it may be different in other areas. Not sure how successful I would be living on that amount though. :eek:
Notarized copy of marriage certificate (if married to a Russian)
Notarized translated (into Russian of course) copy of your passport
Notarized copy of apartment ownership document where you are registered
Passport style pictures, black and white, non-digital (don't ask :))


There may be other things I've left out (and probably are), since I'm going by memory here, but I believe these are most of the major ones.

Having said all this, I highly recommend (as the previous poster suggested) confirming all requirements with your local OVIR.

Some further comments:

Having a temporary residency permit does NOT entitle you to legally work in Russia. This was changed a few years ago (don't remember exactly when), hence the bank statement showing you can support yourself for 3 years. You must get permanent residency to legally work.

An exit visa is required with temporary residency. Once you have permanent residency, no visa of any sort is necessary - you can leave and come back whenever you wish (ura! :)).

Once you have a temporary residency permit for one (1) year, you may then apply for permanent residency.

Contrary to an earlier post, a private visa is not necessary to apply. Of course it's not a strange occurrence to hear one thing then discover something else later on, but my documents were 'pre-examined' and this was not brought up as an issue.

Not sure at this point how accurate this is, but I was basically told that with a permanent residency permit, I would have most of the rights and privileges that Russian citizens enjoy, including the ability to vote. I just wouldn't be able to run for public office. :)

One last point, we have been told that applications can take up to six months to process, so plan accordingly. If you are close to getting all your documents together, you can save some time by submitting what you have now as long as you can give them the rest within 30 days. This at least starts the '6 month' clock ticking. :)

If you are married to a Russian and planning to stay here for awhile (or forever), then I highly recommend doing this. Yes, the initial paperwork can be a PITA, but the long term benefits are well worth it, IMHO.

Sorry for the long-winded (and first) post. :D

Clean32
02-11-2007, 10:20
Looks like you have it about coverd, BUT you may notice from the poats, many of us have doint trnp res and Res each one of us has had a slightly difrent exsperiance. i think the best way is to head dow to you liocal OVIR / FMS office, and check there.

good luck

Bels
02-11-2007, 20:16
As I am currently going through this process now, I can confirm that the basics have pretty much remained the same.


Medicals (including HIV). This is a standard type consisting of various checks, so be sure to mention what you need this for and you will receive the proper medical document (assuming you've passed everything :)).
Criminal history record. According to our local OVIR, this MUST be Apostille'd
Bank statement (from Russian bank) showing a balance sufficient to support yourself for 3 years, according to minimum standard of living. We were told this amounts to 5000 rubles a month, or 180,000 rubles total, however it may be different in other areas. Not sure how successful I would be living on that amount though. :eek:
Notarized copy of marriage certificate (if married to a Russian)
Notarized translated (into Russian of course) copy of your passport
Notarized copy of apartment ownership document where you are registered
Passport style pictures, black and white, non-digital (don't ask :))


There may be other things I've left out (and probably are), since I'm going by memory here, but I believe these are most of the major ones.

Having said all this, I highly recommend (as the previous poster suggested) confirming all requirements with your local OVIR.

Some further comments:

Having a temporary residency permit does NOT entitle you to legally work in Russia. This was changed a few years ago (don't remember exactly when), hence the bank statement showing you can support yourself for 3 years. You must get permanent residency to legally work.

An exit visa is required with temporary residency. Once you have permanent residency, no visa of any sort is necessary - you can leave and come back whenever you wish (ura! :)).

Once you have a temporary residency permit for one (1) year, you may then apply for permanent residency.

Contrary to an earlier post, a private visa is not necessary to apply. Of course it's not a strange occurrence to hear one thing then discover something else later on, but my documents were 'pre-examined' and this was not brought up as an issue.

Not sure at this point how accurate this is, but I was basically told that with a permanent residency permit, I would have most of the rights and privileges that Russian citizens enjoy, including the ability to vote. I just wouldn't be able to run for public office. :)

One last point, we have been told that applications can take up to six months to process, so plan accordingly. If you are close to getting all your documents together, you can save some time by submitting what you have now as long as you can give them the rest within 30 days. This at least starts the '6 month' clock ticking. :)

If you are married to a Russian and planning to stay here for awhile (or forever), then I highly recommend doing this. Yes, the initial paperwork can be a PITA, but the long term benefits are well worth it, IMHO.

Sorry for the long-winded (and first) post. :D

Yes I believe you are basically right. However I'm concerned about your statement of having no right to work, without a work permit. Why they did this I don't know as there is no logic. Don't they want the spouse to support their spouse? It makes I repeat no logic for a family.

However, with the translation from my wife I do believe that you have a right to apply for the entrepeneurs license, which will give you the right to work self employed and pay Russian taxes of 6%.

Guest
02-11-2007, 20:46
> quote=VladSkywolf;305677

If you allow me some comments... :)

> Criminal history record. According to our local OVIR, this MUST be Apostille'd

and translated into Russian by a notary

> Bank statement (from Russian bank)

No, it is not required anymore now. If anyway you supply one, you will see that the FMS officer will look at it but will give it back to you.


Add an ordinary (not notarized) copy of your wife's passport IF she is Russian,

> Notarized copy of apartment ownership document where you are registered

PLUS an attestation (not notarized) less than one month old, that the apartment (the place where you will be registered for your resid. permit) has all its amenities paid.

Also add 2 envelopes with stamps, addressed to YOU in the place you will be registered.

And do not forget the original form that FMS will give to you, filled (2 copies). Do not sign it, you must sign it with the FMS officer when he will receive all your documents.


> Once you have a temporary residency permit for one (1) year, you may then apply for permanent residency.

Yes, and if you are married (Russian wife/husband of course) since 3 years at least, you may immediately apply for Russian citizenship.


> One last point, we have been told that applications can take up to six months to process, so plan accordingly. If you are close to getting all your documents together, you can save some time by submitting what you have now as long as you can give them the rest within 30 days. This at least starts the '6 month' clock ticking. :)


In practice it is 5 to 6 months, you are right. But most FMS offices will accept your application ONLY if ALL the documents are there. And when all documents will be ready, they will ask you "Did you pay the FMS fee?". You will say NO, so you will have to go to Sberbank, pay 400 rub (I think it is 400 now), bring back the receipt and at least all will be fine :)


You must be in person to give the documents then to pickup the residence permit. Between, you may leave Russia, no problem.

And do not forget the usual chocolates/koniak/martini etc, for the FMS :) :)

Clean32
02-11-2007, 20:59
Guest bloody amazing, has some one been doing some resurch?? good on ya Mate

Judge
02-11-2007, 21:13
Guest bloody amazing, has some one been doing some resurch?? good on ya Mate

Guest is a good lad.....

maybe the mods could put some of this thread together and make it a sticky,it would save expats who need to know alot of time..

ezik
02-11-2007, 22:22
We'll put it together and make it sticky.

As soon as we've got another competition coming up, please remind me to put Vladksywolf and Guest way in advance with credits.

This sort of posts is so valuable. Really, many cheers for that! Very well done. Thanks!

thewanderer
03-11-2007, 01:25
We'll put it together and make it sticky.

As soon as we've got another competition coming up, please remind me to put Vladksywolf and Guest way in advance with credits.

This sort of posts is so valuable. Really, many cheers for that! Very well done. Thanks!

Fully agreed. Gold stars for both of you. Excellent and very helpful info.

Blackwidow
03-11-2007, 16:28
Well done the lads,

but actually I have gone through these procedures (permament residency) and more or less know it all :) and IF anyone previously noted I was always willing to tell people what and how to do it - including the nice "podarki" - which by the way is essential otehriwse "red tape" takes over. I am just finalising my desire to get Russian Citizenship - so if you 'happily' married English Gays err Guys want to really prove that Russia is for you and not just a bit of "skirt" fun, then you can contact me anytime on how to get Citizenship or full Residency and more importantly what you entitlements are and what you have to do to maintain them - remember you have to re-register every year :).

Best regards and good luck to anyone who likes to deal with Russian Administration, Militisia and Notorious (Pun - a)

Mike

VladSkywolf
04-11-2007, 08:57
> quote=VladSkywolf;305677

If you allow me some comments... :)



Guest, your comments are most welcome. Thanks for filling in the holes!

Some comments to your comments, if I may. :)

>> Criminal history record. According to our local OVIR, this MUST be Apostille'd

> and translated into Russian by a notary

Actually the translation is not done by a notary, but by a qualified translator (who must bring their diploma and passport), who must then accompany you to the notary. Unless, of course, the notary is also a qualified translator (haven't found one here :)).

>> Bank statement (from Russian bank)

> No, it is not required anymore now. If anyway you supply one, you will see that the FMS officer will look at it but will give it back to you.

Do you mean that the bank statement is not required, or that it doesn't have to be from a Russian bank? The information we were given is to show a bank statement and proof of income (although the latter is not required but would help).

> In practice it is 5 to 6 months, you are right. But most FMS offices will accept your application ONLY if ALL the documents are there. And when all documents will be ready, they will ask you "Did you pay the FMS fee?". You will say NO, so you will have to go to Sberbank, pay 400 rub (I think it is 400 now), bring back the receipt and at least all will be fine :)

Yes, whether or not each FMS office adheres to the letter of the law is sometimes a hit or miss proposition. As we were told: "we do as our boss tells us to do". :) So I think it's true that many will not accept the application unless all documents are ready, even though the law allows for this. And yes, we already made our payment to Sberbank. :)

> And do not forget the usual chocolates/koniak/martini etc, for the FMS :) :)

Yep, never hurts to show your appreciation for all their hard work. :) :)

VladSkywolf
04-11-2007, 09:08
Yes I believe you are basically right. However I'm concerned about your statement of having no right to work, without a work permit. Why they did this I don't know as there is no logic. Don't they want the spouse to support their spouse? It makes I repeat no logic for a family.

However, with the translation from my wife I do believe that you have a right to apply for the entrepeneurs license, which will give you the right to work self employed and pay Russian taxes of 6%.

Bels,

I agree that, at least from our perspective, it doesn't make any logical sense, especially if we are trying to support a family (and do our part to improve the demographic situation :D). If someone already has official permission to stay, why not collect the taxes this hard working individual could generate?

Alas, I'm sure there was some justification to this change in the law, I'm just ignorant of what this might be.

Guest
04-11-2007, 09:39
> Do you mean that the bank statement is not required, or that it doesn't have to be from a Russian bank? The information we were given is to show a bank statement and proof of income (although the latter is not required but would help).


The bank statement is not required anymore.

phoenixsampras
07-11-2007, 23:11
For the SAKE of GOD!!! Help me to find a decent NOTARIOUS, im in the final step to get my 3 year residency, and the bloody notarious is asking me the planes for the apt... and considering i speak russian at 3 year old level, they are askin a official translator...

Tip: Once you started the 3 year visa, GET/SEARCH a tolerant Notarious and get your deparment papers in order.... :mad:

Guest
07-11-2007, 23:15
What do you exactly need as document?? Notaries just copy and put their stamp on the copy, eventually on the translated copies! So even if you don't speak ONE word in Russian, I cannot see where it can be a problem...

Rustralian
08-11-2007, 01:48
> and translated into Russian by a notary

Actually the translation is not done by a notary, but by a qualified translator (who must bring their diploma and passport), who must then accompany you to the notary. Unless, of course, the notary is also a qualified translator (haven't found one here :)).



There is one in Myasnitskaya about 100m from the Chistye Prudie Metro towards the Centre. They are at the back and upstairs of the old Chinese Building (that has been renovated and looks good, with the Chinese shop downstairs - not sure of the exact number, but it is opposite the little casino). They do translation and notarisation and they are pretty quick most times - a few hours is all they need, depending how busy they are (and they seem to have a pretty steady flow of paperwork going over their desks) which is most probably a good sign.

Rustralian
08-11-2007, 01:57
For the SAKE of GOD!!! Help me to find a decent NOTARIOUS, im in the final step to get my 3 year residency, and the bloody notarious is asking me the planes for the apt... and considering i speak russian at 3 year old level, they are askin a official translator...

Tip: Once you started the 3 year visa, GET/SEARCH a tolerant Notarious and get your deparment papers in order.... :mad:

See my above post for a location for combined translation/notarisation - and you would have to assume that if they can translate they can speak enough English to explain things to you.

A bit like Guest though, I am not exactly sure what document you are referring to - did you mean plans for the apartment? Or something else? Obviously your fingers were as cheesed off as you and were not playing ball when you typed the message :)

phoenixsampras
08-11-2007, 12:24
See my above post for a location for combined translation/notarisation - and you would have to assume that if they can translate they can speak enough English to explain things to you.

A bit like Guest though, I am not exactly sure what document you are referring to - did you mean plans for the apartment? Or something else? Obviously your fingers were as cheesed off as you and were not playing ball when you typed the message :)


Thank you a lot Rus, today im going to the notarious with a translator i hired, if that Fails... (wihich ill not wonder) ill try your chinesse notarious.

raza
08-11-2007, 16:17
Today at Stavropol MVD HQ I had my Temporary Residency stamp, valid for 3 years, entered into my UK Passport, exactly 4 and a half months since my application papers were accepted by the said HQ.
Tomorrow I apply for my 3 year multi-exit/entry visa, a simple procedure so I am lead to believe.
If anyone else is contemplating going down this road then please ask, privately or publicly, and I will help in whatever way I am able.
Regards,
Jeff Gordon.

i would like to know about this 3 years multi-exit/entry visa which is really new for me.pls post how to apply.
raza

Bels
08-11-2007, 16:38
i would like to know about this 3 years multi-exit/entry visa which is really new for me.pls post how to apply.
raza

First of all how old is this post you quoted? I think Cyprus Jeff is on permanent residency now. OOPS! I just found it 5th May 2004 and there has been a massive amount on this subject written since then.

I assume you have temporary residency? And if this multi exit exists I assume you ask and apply at where you got the temporary residency visa.Your local OVIR.

I don't know the details about this yet, but I will know very soon. I assume it's got something to do with permission to leave the country and re-enter the country.

VladSkywolf
16-11-2007, 09:18
There is one in Myasnitskaya about 100m from the Chistye Prudie Metro towards the Centre. They are at the back and upstairs of the old Chinese Building (that has been renovated and looks good, with the Chinese shop downstairs - not sure of the exact number, but it is opposite the little casino). They do translation and notarisation and they are pretty quick most times - a few hours is all they need, depending how busy they are (and they seem to have a pretty steady flow of paperwork going over their desks) which is most probably a good sign.

Too bad they're in Moscow - now if only they would open an affiliate office in Vladivostok, I'd be set! :)

raydg
30-11-2007, 19:48
> Do you mean that the bank statement is not required, or that it doesn't have to be from a Russian bank? The information we were given is to show a bank statement and proof of income (although the latter is not required but would help).


The bank statement is not required anymore.

Unless the local OVIR (wife, who is Russian still calls it that) says the bank statement is required. Which we were told today that it is required to prove that I can live here for three years.

Bels
30-11-2007, 19:56
Unless the local OVIR (wife, who is Russian still calls it that) says the bank statement is required. Which we were told today that it is required to prove that I can live here for three years.

Times must have changed, as I didn't show a bank statement from me or any form of income. And I've just recently had my residency.