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nbogaard
09-04-2010, 13:59
Okay, everybody, my wife and I are leaving on a vacation and cruise for a couple of weeks in about ten days. I would like recommendations for Kindle books I might take with me. This is what's on my Kindle so far for the trip:

Caught by Harlan Coben
The Spire by Richard North Patterson
Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Slam by Nick Hornby
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
Guardian of Lies by Steve Martini
The Ghost War by Alex Berenson
The Silent Man by Alex Berenson
The Midnight House by Alex Berenson

Thanks!

nbogaard
09-04-2010, 14:01
I'm still learning. I think this somehow got into current affairs. It must have been something I did wrong but I have no idea what. Help!!

FatAndy
09-04-2010, 14:42
http://flibusta.net/
Seek here if you have FB2 format compatible reader - most of books here are in FB2. For access to non-FB2 formats you have to register and login.

yes, it sticked to Current affairs subforum. Write to admins, they will move your thread into correct place.

Carbo
09-04-2010, 14:53
Well, for some poolside/beach page-turning fiction, I'd recommend just about anything by Frederick Fosyth. However, if I had to pick one, it would be his first novel, The Day of the Jackal (surely one of the greatest, and most underrated thrillers ever). But The Odessa File, The Dogs of War, The Devils Alternative, The Fist of God, Icon, and The Negotiator all come highly recommended. Pick any of them, and you'll not be disappointed. If you haven't read The Day of the Jackal, though, get it downloaded. It's so exciting, so keenly observed and feels so real, you'll just not be able to put it down.

I would also recommend in the light reading segment my favourite two spy novels, both by John le Carre. The first, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, is, in my view, the best spy novel ever. It's so terse, hard boiled and exciting, and it's full of deceit and mind bogglingly clever twists. The other thing I like is that it doesn't have a pious moralistic outlook, and, indeed, it paints the spies on both sides as wholly immoral. The other great book I'd recommend is Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Its main character is George Smiley, who can perhaps best be described as the anti-Bond. Smiley is fat, hopeless with women, allows his promiscuous wife to cheat on him, and must rely on his wit, incredible memory and sharp mind to achieve his ends. In the book, he's brought out of retirement to hunt a mole at the heart of the British Secret Service, and you see the story through his eyes, as he unravels the mystery, and does battle with his mirror image, the Soviet spymaster, Karla.

If you're interested in more serious literature, I would some of the modern American classics I've become so fond of. A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway, the Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, some of the new journalist writers in the 50s and 60s like Mailer (The Fight and The Naked and the Dead are the two that spring immediately to mind), and Hunter S Thompson (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is astounding, and astoundingly funny), and perhaps more recently Cormack McCarthy, who's No Country for No Men and The Road read like fairy tales allegorical of the American dream, and the history of the America.

A short novella that you might like is On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan. I thought it was exquisitely written, and gave wonderful insights into the mentality of lovers scorned. It's also short enough to read in an afternoon.

Or, you could also read my favourite book -- and the one I think is the most important written in the 20th century -- Nineteen Eighty Four. It's something every adult should have read, really.

I was going to recommend some non-fiction, but all the ones hat come to mind immediately are big, heavyweight tomes that might take the entire holiday to plough through.

nbogaard
09-04-2010, 15:33
Thanks, Carbo. Neither “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.” nor the Ian McEwan novella are available on Kindle, I think I have read everything you recommended. I love reading John LeCarre (Smiley is the best) and Frederick Forsythe (I have liked everything he has written but still think that “The Day of the Jackal” was his very best).

My wife and I have an ongoing argument regarding Fitzgerald; she loves his writing and I cannot abide it. Hemingway is one of my favorites. I loved “Islands in the Stream” and “A Moveable Feast.” I read “1984” years and years ago. I have tried but can’t get into Cormac McCarthy, too dark for my taste. I love reading Ivan Doig, if you would like a nice read.

Carbo
09-04-2010, 16:40
Thanks, Carbo. Neither “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.” nor the Ian McEwan novella are available on Kindle, I think I have read everything you recommended. I love reading John LeCarre (Smiley is the best) and Frederick Forsythe (I have liked everything he has written but still think that “The Day of the Jackal” was his very best).

My wife and I have an ongoing argument regarding Fitzgerald; she loves his writing and I cannot abide it. Hemingway is one of my favorites. I loved “Islands in the Stream” and “A Moveable Feast.” I read “1984” years and years ago. I have tried but can’t get into Cormac McCarthy, too dark for my taste. I love reading Ivan Doig, if you would like a nice read.

Funny you should mention that about Fitzgerald, because I have encountered similar reactions myself. I love him, others loath him. I suspect that if you don't like it, you may not like On Chesil Beach.

Meantime, I have both Chesil Beach and Fear and Loathing on my Sony Ebook reader, so, if you can put those files on your Kindle (they're .txt files, but can be converted into .doc or anything, if you like), I'd be willing to email them.

McCarthy is interesting, because on the one hand, he has a very dry, parsed writing style with virtually no punctuation and few adjectives. On the other, his stories have a mystical, almost dreamy undercurrent. I really feel besotted by his work when I read it (although I'm not particularly well-read, so I've only read two of his books.)

Matt24
09-04-2010, 17:24
Okay, everybody, my wife and I are leaving on a vacation and cruise for a couple of weeks in about ten days. I would like recommendations for Kindle books I might take with me. This is what's on my Kindle so far for the trip:

Caught by Harlan Coben
The Spire by Richard North Patterson
Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Slam by Nick Hornby
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
Guardian of Lies by Steve Martini
The Ghost War by Alex Berenson
The Silent Man by Alex Berenson
The Midnight House by Alex Berenson

Thanks!

Sorry, not knowing if on Kindle or not, and non of it is 'spook lit' but seeing as you have the space I'd try the following:

for concentrated tanning, it'll take a couple or three hours to read 'who moved my blackberry?' Martin Lukes and Lucy Kellaway - I sometimes teach organisational behaviour and this book is office politics / marriage guidance and child management in a nutshell, it's a bit cringy, especially if you recognise similar behaviour in your self, and its unashamedly British humour but well worth a look.

'Guns, Germs and Steel' Jared Diamond - lumpier read but will make you an instant expert on just about anything, brilliantly written -

'We need to talk about Kevin' Lionel Shriver - Stunner, it's so full of darkness, I'm not a big fiction reader so my sample size is small, I think this could be one of the best thrillers...like ever. It completely changed the way I deal with my kids.

'Star of the Sea' Joseph O'Connor - it's not brilliant, but it is about boats, and the story is quite unputtdownable.

Another piece of very good pulp is 'Complicity' knock it out in five hours, few cocktails and a nightmare, very entertaining.

Every year I read 'For whom the Bell Tolls' I have Spanish colleagues and it explains a lot about there behaviour....but apart from that I think it's probably the best piece of English language prose ever written...I need a lot of distraction to keep me on the sun deck and away from the bar.

Matt

TD
09-04-2010, 20:05
If you like thriller/spook stuff Nelson Demille (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=nelson+demille) is a good author - start with Amazon.com: The Charm School (9780751531183): Nelson DeMille: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515P7bSe5KL.@@AMEPARAM@@515P7bSe5KL" (the Moscow/Russia element makes it interesting).

Amazon.com: Point of Impact (9780099453451): Stephen Hunter: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41DXP2N2EJL.@@AMEPARAM@@41DXP2N2EJL by Stephen Hunter is also a great read, in fact all of his stuff is great

Forsyth of course is one of the best in that genre - I have read all his stuff.

Historical fiction - my alltime favorite is the "Masters of Rome" series by Colleen McCullough (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_8?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=colleen+mccullough&x=0&y=0&sprefix=Colleen+) about the life of Julius Caesar. The first book is "Amazon.com: The First Man in Rome: Colleen Mccullough: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KSEUT8JuL.@@AMEPARAM@@51KSEUT8JuL"

Not sure how to import non-kindle titles into the device, but I assume it is possible. I suggest grabbing a copy of "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow - good read, and you can grab a free ebook version at his site --> http://craphound.com/littlebrother/download/ (update: there is a link there for a native kindle version of the book)

Swordfish90293
09-04-2010, 21:07
Anything James Ellroy leaps off the page and gets my adrenalin pumped. He's best known for 'L.A. Confidential' and 'The Black Dahalia'. I just started his latest 'Blood's a Rover' and it rocks if you have the energy to go at it. 'My Dark Places' is shorter and autobio. If you're uninitiated 'Crime Wave' is a good short story collection.

'Red Dragon' is said by him to be the best detective thriller ever written. Don't be put off by the movie. The book is captivating.

Thomas Pynchon's 'V' and 'Gravity's Rainbow' are great fiction.

Speaking of short stories, just picked up Ludmilla Petrushevskaya's short collection "Scary Fairy Tales' based on Soviet lifestyle...

"Master and Margarita' is standard issue Russian fare, and satires Soviet thinking in interesting ways. Penguin is the best translator of foreign titles into English.

Anthony Bourdain has a few interesting titles I haven't gotten to, but I dig his travel show.

Plutarch's 'Lives of the Noble Romans' and 'Greeks' is always inspiring.

Can you get 'Hustler' on Kindle?

AstroNoodle
10-04-2010, 08:19
I'm still learning. I think this somehow got into current affairs. It must have been something I did wrong but I have no idea what. Help!!

Half of the posters in the Current Affairs section are always telling the other half that what they are writing is fiction and vice versa. So that means that if you want to post fiction, you are 100% in good company.

I've never read the Guns, Germs, and Steel book, but I did watch a documentary spin-off and got the gist. The thesis presented just reinforced the idea for me that my country, the US, became New Babylon in part by killing the buffalo and antelope and replacing them with cows, hormones to make cows grow faster, and McDonalds.

nbogaard
10-04-2010, 08:40
That's funny. Every year, I re-read Faulkner's 'The Bear' Not for any educational reason but just because I like the atmosphere he creates. I ordered 'Guns, Germs and Steel' and 'We Need to Talk about Kevin' but couldn't find 'Star of the Sea', so I settled for a newer Joseph O'Connor, 'Redemption Falls.' Thanks for the recommendations!


Sorry, not knowing if on Kindle or not, and non of it is 'spook lit' but seeing as you have the space I'd try the following:

for concentrated tanning, it'll take a couple or three hours to read 'who moved my blackberry?' Martin Lukes and Lucy Kellaway - I sometimes teach organisational behaviour and this book is office politics / marriage guidance and child management in a nutshell, it's a bit cringy, especially if you recognise similar behaviour in your self, and its unashamedly British humour but well worth a look.

'Guns, Germs and Steel' Jared Diamond - lumpier read but will make you an instant expert on just about anything, brilliantly written -

'We need to talk about Kevin' Lionel Shriver - Stunner, it's so full of darkness, I'm not a big fiction reader so my sample size is small, I think this could be one of the best thrillers...like ever. It completely changed the way I deal with my kids.

'Star of the Sea' Joseph O'Connor - it's not brilliant, but it is about boats, and the story is quite unputtdownable.

Another piece of very good pulp is 'Complicity' knock it out in five hours, few cocktails and a nightmare, very entertaining.

Every year I read 'For whom the Bell Tolls' I have Spanish colleagues and it explains a lot about there behaviour....but apart from that I think it's probably the best piece of English language prose ever written...I need a lot of distraction to keep me on the sun deck and away from the bar.

Matt

nbogaard
10-04-2010, 08:53
I believe I have never missed a Nelson DeMille novel.

[QUOTE=TD;646853]If you like thriller/spook stuff Nelson Demille (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=nelson+demille) is a good author - start with Amazon.com: The Charm School (9780751531183): Nelson DeMille: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515P7bSe5KL.@@AMEPARAM@@515P7bSe5KL" (the Moscow/Russia element makes it interesting).

I ordered 'Point of Impact.' Thanks for the recommendation.

Point of Impact by Stephen Hunter:

I have read all of the Forsythe stuff too.
Forsyth of course is one of the best in that genre - I have read all his stuff.

I read all of the Conn Iggulden Caesar series. I'll try Ms. McCullough
"Masters of Rome" series by Colleen McCullough, "The First Man in Rome" by Colleen Mccullough

Thanks again!

nbogaard
10-04-2010, 09:07
I hadn't thought of James Ellroy. A very good suggestion. Unfortunately, not available on Kindle.


Anything James Ellroy leaps off the page and gets my adrenalin pumped. He's best known for 'L.A. Confidential' and 'The Black Dahalia'. I just started his latest 'Blood's a Rover' and it rocks if you have the energy to go at it. 'My Dark Places' is shorter and autobio. If you're uninitiated 'Crime Wave' is a good short story collection.

I read "Red Dragon"years ago. An excellent book.

'Red Dragon' is said by him to be the best detective thriller ever written. Don't be put off by the movie. The book is captivating.

I am told by lots of people I respect that Pynchon is indeed great fiction. I've tried. I just can't get into his writing.

Thomas Pynchon's 'V' and 'Gravity's Rainbow' are great fiction.

I can't find it.

Speaking of short stories, just picked up Ludmilla Petrushevskaya's short collection "Scary Fairy Tales' based on Soviet lifestyle...

M&M? Read it and loved it.

"Master and Margarita' is standard issue Russian fare, and satires Soviet thinking in interesting ways. Penguin is the best translator of foreign titles into English.

Anthony Bourdain has a few interesting titles I haven't gotten to, but I dig his travel show.

I think Plutarch is a bit heavier than I am looking for. I don't want to be inspired, just relax and enjoy.

Plutarch's 'Lives of the Noble Romans' and 'Greeks' is always inspiring.

This is great following Plutarch. Inasmuch as the iPad is in color. I think that would be a better bet!

Can you get 'Hustler' on Kindle?

Thanks, Swordfish!