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ChrisC30
25-02-2005, 02:09
It just hit me. I've had food from all across the globe, but I've never had anything Russian (atleast that I know of) besides *gasp* Hamburger Helper Beef Stroganoff.

What are some of your favorite Russian foods? Drink? Popular snacks?

Big Bugga
25-02-2005, 03:42
pelmeni or shashlik hands down.

bugga'

trebor
25-02-2005, 06:05
I think Bugga has single handedly, in two lines covered Russian cuisine!:)

The soups are pretty good too.

Sheepy
25-02-2005, 07:54
I'll second the soups, trebor. I just love Borsch and Shi.:inlove: Also, (i'm not sure if its Russian by origin) but that salad called 'Herring in a fur coat' (please correct me here in case I've translated it incorrectly). :inlove:

yankee@moscow
25-02-2005, 08:25
Originally posted by Big Bugga
pelmeni or shashlik hands down.

bugga'

I'm with you on this one. You have to wash that down with a little bit of medavuka though!

trebor
25-02-2005, 08:52
Medavuka..................i love it!
I tried samagon once, tasted like aviation fuel!:mad:

Sheepy
25-02-2005, 08:57
Originally posted by yankee@moscow
I'm with you on this one. You have to wash that down with a little bit of medavuka though!

And on a similar note I love Kvas. Have tried to make it myself a couple of times but failed miserably. Anyone have a reliable fool-proof recipe for this?

Halyavshik
25-02-2005, 09:36
I hope this isn't a hi-jack, but my favorite cuisine here is the Georgian/Armenian (Caucasian in general) food which has made its way in like Tex Mex is considered American. I mean chebureki, khachapuri, dolma, assorted lobios, satsivi, etc: it all rocks ! I know it's not really Russian, but I think there are few other places abroad (except the Baltics and former CIS) where you can get some really good Caucasian food.

chunkyhunkymonkey
25-02-2005, 09:43
a chicken and lamb shashlik with 'mushed potato' (according to the menu @ Yalki Palki:D )

It's not even 10am and i fancy some of that!:p

kniga
25-02-2005, 09:46
Cutlets made from three types of meat and great seasonings, white bean and chicken soup thick enough to stand a spoon up in and "greens," a breakfast omelet made of spinach, eggs, a little sausage and cheese with special seasonings and looking like a big, green frittata when finished are great Russian dishes!

yankee@moscow
25-02-2005, 09:48
Originally posted by Halyavshik
I hope this isn't a hi-jack........

What? Did you turn over a new leaf all of the sudden?:)

Halyavshik
25-02-2005, 09:51
Originally posted by yankee@moscow
What? Did you turn over a new leaf all of the sudden?:)

The New and Improved Halyavshik (and 20% Bigger) !

Yankee, thank you for posting !

Love, hugs and kisses,
Hal

Braders
25-02-2005, 14:52
Form an orderly queue please. I'll take a hug Halyavshik ;)

Pelmeni, yeah, absolutely, with English Cheddar melted on top!

RDV
25-02-2005, 15:04
I doubt they sell Kvas in Florida but if you ever come across it elsewhere. give it a try. I love it!

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 15:18
well, just a week ago I had a chance to taste a chinese(my dad is very fond of it)=> it's very special one but you know, Russian cuisine is the greatest. Just what the pankakes are! with caviar and that kind: bubliki!

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 15:21
Originally posted by kniga
Cutlets made from three types of meat and great seasonings, white bean and chicken soup thick enough to stand a spoon up in and "greens," a breakfast omelet made of spinach, eggs, a little sausage and cheese with special seasonings and looking like a big, green frittata when finished are great Russian dishes!
Absolutely!!!
How just we are still having people in the world who have had such a happiness to feel the Russian traditions!:)

monkey-girl
25-02-2005, 15:22
just love Borsch and Shi.

May I remind you that borsch is actually a Ukrainian dish :) and so are vareniki (I abslutely love them!)

oh! and so-called "blinnyi pirog" (sort of a pie made of pancakes) can be great too!

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 15:22
sorry for my mistake: not "have" but "haven't"(the 12th word) ;)

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 15:24
Originally posted by monkey-girl
May I remind you that borsch is actually a Ukrainian dish :) and so are vareniki (I abslutely love them!)

oh! and so-called "blinnyi pirog" (sort of a pie made of pancakes) can be great too!
Yeah! that's it!
and + the "pel'meny" also. I've read that they are fron Ukrain!

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 15:26
Originally posted by monkey-girl

"blinnyi pirog" (sort of a pie made of pancakes) can be great too!

sounds yammy!:p

Kseniya
25-02-2005, 15:40
Originally posted by Sheepy
'Herring in a fur coat' (please correct me here in case I've translated it incorrectly). :inlove:

Sheepy, in Russian it sounds like "Seledka pod shuboy" :)

ChrisC30
25-02-2005, 16:32
Thankyou everyone :D

I'm looking at recipes now! ;)

CatGirl
25-02-2005, 17:50
Originally posted by ChrisC30
Thankyou everyone :D

I'm looking at recipes now! ;)
ALWAYS WELCOME , DUDE!

jules
26-02-2005, 01:00
I don't have a Russian cousine, nor a cousin either, so I can't have a favourite one... that title looks pretty funny to French speakers! ;)

Re food, I really like tvorog - blini s tvorogom, vareniki c tvorogom, those little syrok things... it's best with raisins but still yummy without... glad I found lactose pills here!

DJ Biscuit
26-02-2005, 02:29
Ah it's about CUISINE, in that case, don't wanna spoil the party but anything without mayonnaise would be fine.

Vodka with pepper?

Rita
26-02-2005, 06:37
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
Ah it's about CUISINE, in that case, don't wanna spoil the party but anything without mayonnaise would be fine.

Vodka with pepper?

Russian food without mayonnaise? Are you kidding? :D

Rita
26-02-2005, 06:38
Originally posted by rdv
I doubt they sell Kvas in Florida but if you ever come across it elsewhere. give it a try. I love it!
Any Russian store in FL most likely will have it.

J.D.
26-02-2005, 07:07
Originally posted by jules
I don't have a Russian cousine, nor a cousin either, so I can't have a favourite one... that title looks pretty funny to French speakers! ;)



Well that explains Cosmogirl's post about a Chinese.

Polia Ivanova
26-02-2005, 14:19
Originally posted by trebor
Medavuka..................i love it!
I tried samagon once, tasted like aviation fuel!:mad:

The idea of dissolving honey in water and fermenting it is not Russian. They sell bottles of the stuff in Victoria and Albert Museum in London (made in the UK) as one of typical Olde English specialities

DPG
26-02-2005, 15:01
Polia - Samagon is distilled not fermented...the drink you are talking about at the V&A is most likely mead - pretty tasty, available here everywhere and I think it's a speciality in Suzdal (or maybe it was Vladimir?).

Also, I was under the impression that Pel'meni were a Siberian dish (ok, it's still Russia) but can anyone confirm for sure?

As for my favourite "Former Soviet Union" foods, Borshch (Ukraine) is really nice, Shashlik, Lobio, Chatchapuri and Satsivi (Caucuses) are delicious (especially when eaten together when you're starving!!).

Selodka Pod Shubi and anything else swimming in mayonnaise or smetana (like NYE 'salads) are for me, nothing short of vile.

Kseniya
26-02-2005, 15:56
when we began to talk about food here I became so hungry...
it is necessary to eat smth while answering to this thread:D

ChrisC30
26-02-2005, 18:12
OOps...yes I meant CUIsine, of course :D

I brew my own mead, which I must say is very tasty. I love to bake my own bread and pizza, so I'm always eager to try new recipes.

Halyavshik
26-02-2005, 21:10
Ooh, ooh, I forgot one, which I'm pretty sure is Russian. Myasnaya Solyanka. Thick and creamy solianka with a dollup of smetana. Mmmmmm.

P.S. I've been waiting for a good opportunity to use the word 'dollup'.

trebor
27-02-2005, 21:57
Originally posted by Halyavshik
................P.S. I've been waiting for a good opportunity to use the word 'dollup'.

Yes, there IS no other way to describe smetana other than dollop!:)

yankee@moscow
27-02-2005, 21:59
So, which is it:

dollop
or
dollup?

trebor
27-02-2005, 22:02
Originally posted by yankee@moscow
So, which is it:

dollop
or
dollup?

I'm not a professor of english, or even a professor!
But my money's on Dollop. :)

DPG
27-02-2005, 22:33
My money is with Trebor!

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=23154&dict=CALD

It is spelt with an 'o' rather than a 'u' in the American English Dictionary too...

Halyavshik
28-02-2005, 01:27
I take comfort in the fact that it's 'dollop' of all the words in the English language that I could possibly be ridiculed for spelling incorrectly.

:D

Filimon
28-02-2005, 02:13
Originally posted by Halyavshik
I hope this isn't a hi-jack, but my favorite cuisine here is the Georgian/Armenian (Caucasian in general) food which has made its way in like Tex Mex is considered American. I mean chebureki, khachapuri, dolma, assorted lobios, satsivi, etc: it all rocks ! I know it's not really Russian, but I think there are few other places abroad (except the Baltics and former CIS) where you can get some really good Caucasian food.

There are two places in London. And my good friend is about to open another.

J.D.
28-02-2005, 06:14
Maybe 'dollup' is a compound phrasal verb word . . thing.
Or maybe Hal is just on the cutting edge. Hacking his way through the unchartered lexical jungle clearing the way for the dictionary that will follow.

DPG
28-02-2005, 11:26
Funnily enough 'to doll one's self up' is a phrasal verb in some parts of the UK - it has the meaning of a woman getting ready to go out by putting extra effort into make up and clothes...

It makes Halyavshik, even MORE wrong!!:p