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TD
22-03-2010, 17:52
Welcome MissAnnElk :sunny:

As most of us are aware you have recently moved to Luxembourg...

1. What was your first impression upon landing there?
2. Name three glaring differences between there & Moscow
3. Are the shopkeepers as friendly as the ones here?
4. What's the bureaucracy like in comparison?

Matt24
22-03-2010, 18:44
Miss Ann Elk,

In the words of the poet, 'there must be 50 ways to leave your lover' please can you shed some pearls of wisdom, as a worldly wise women and icon of reasonableness,( certainly amongst many of your devoted fannage both here in Moscow and in the other nations lucky enough to have felt the impact of your occupancy), what are your methods of choice and under which conditions and for what outcome would you employ specific tactics?

Cheers

Matt

Bels
22-03-2010, 21:05
Hello Miss AnnElik. You have now lived in Russia for sometime. What are your plans for the future?

Your family and your profession. Where do do you and for your family want to be in let's say three year?

AndreyS
22-03-2010, 21:30
First, guys, find her on Facebook and bring here. ;-)
She is, for sure, there.

shurale
22-03-2010, 21:44
What is the meaning of life?

J.D.
22-03-2010, 21:53
How is it that you have an intimate relationship with MrAnnElk when in fact you are MissAnnElk?

Is there some incestuous undertone here?

robertmf
22-03-2010, 21:56
What is the meaning of life?

More like, What's DJ Biscuit going to do for a female lead ... :rant:

Korotky Gennady
22-03-2010, 22:21
What is the meaning of life? Don't you know it yet ?

shurale
22-03-2010, 22:25
Don't you know it yet ?

No. Tell me.

Korotky Gennady
22-03-2010, 22:32
No. Tell me.
give me beer

Mirka
22-03-2010, 22:36
What is the meaning of life?

42

tvadim133
22-03-2010, 22:49
And I would say 23

Mud
22-03-2010, 23:42
"I have with me tonight, Ann Elk, MRS. Ann Elk!"

Matt24
23-03-2010, 06:04
Miss Ann Elk,

Did you spew your pop corn during 'that' scene in 'The Crying Game'?

Cheers

Matt

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 08:49
Welcome MissAnnElk :sunny:

As most of us are aware you have recently moved to Luxembourg...

1. What was your first impression upon landing there?
2. Name three glaring differences between there & Moscow
3. Are the shopkeepers as friendly as the ones here?
4. What's the bureaucracy like in comparison?

Goodness! The honor! The pressure!

So sorry I was not checking in. I will do my best to catch up.

1. On landing in the Lux airport? My first thought was "Where is everyone?" There was NO ONE there. The whole drive (17 minutes) into town . . . "Where are all the cars?"
2. The grocery stores, the grocery stores, the grocery stores. My word, but they are beautiful. I still get choked up. But seriously, the fact that things are not open 24/7 is a big difference (the mall slams shut around 7:00 p.m. on Saturday night). And the orderly parking!
3. Shopkeepers were always friendly to me in Moscow (seriously). They are nice here, too. Most are trilingual (French, German, Luxembourgish) and often speak some English, too, so they are very patient with me.
4. Still dealing with the bureaucracy. We were in a panic because we did not turn in some papers within 3 days . . . "Oh, don't worry!" we were told. "This is not Russia!" Yeah, but in Russia, ahem, there's always a way.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 08:54
Miss Ann Elk,

In the words of the poet, 'there must be 50 ways to leave your lover' please can you shed some pearls of wisdom, as a worldly wise women and icon of reasonableness,( certainly amongst many of your devoted fannage both here in Moscow and in the other nations lucky enough to have felt the impact of your occupancy), what are your methods of choice and under which conditions and for what outcome would you employ specific tactics?

Cheers

Matt

LOL. You're asking ME how to graciously give someone the heave-ho?

I've only done that once (okay, twice), and I found leaving the country the best solution. Oh, and setting your Facebook chat option to "offline."

Seriously, however, that is hard to do. I suppose honesty is always the best policy. But I still felt like a jerk.

And let me just add that "that little experiment in college . . ." Sheesh. Fellas. I feel for you. Nutjobs. Women can be real nutjobs.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 08:58
Hello Miss AnnElik. You have now lived in Russia for sometime. What are your plans for the future?

Your family and your profession. Where do do you and for your family want to be in let's say three year?

Yes, we lived in Moscow for two years. From Dec 2007 until early 2010.

If you had asked me in 2007 if I thought I would be living in Moscow in two years, I would have thought it was within the realm of possibility, but not likely.

If you had asked me at Christmas if I thought I would be sitting in Luxembourg by Easter, I would have said you were crazy.

I just signed a three-year lease, so I hope I am still here in three years. I'd like my kids to be happy and healthy, doing well at school.

I'd like Mr Elk to be enjoying his new job.

I'd like to be thinner. :-)

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 09:03
What is the meaning of life?

Ahhhh . . . the philosophical question.

I suppose I could answer with a song:

YouTube- Monty Python - The Meaning of Life

But seriously, folks.

I'm not a religious person, although I suppose you could call me spiritual. I believe there is energy in the universe. And karma. That we should be good and kind because it is the right thing to do.

I think it was in the novel The Hours, where the narrator or one of the characters says that we are here to help each other get through it all. That works for me.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 09:06
How is it that you have an intimate relationship with MrAnnElk when in fact you are MissAnnElk?

Is there some incestuous undertone here?

Ah . . . another Python reference required.

YouTube- Monty Python - Theory on Brontosauruses by Anne Elk (Miss).


I just wanted a Python reference for my log in.

J.D.
23-03-2010, 09:35
Could you expound on your college 'experiments'?

shurale
23-03-2010, 10:14
Can I ask you a personal question? It should be easier to answer than the meaning of life.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 10:38
Could you expound on your college 'experiments'?

I knew someone was going to ask . . .

The boring answer is that it was the late 1970s, the Women's Movement was a big deal, we were all taking Women's Studies courses for the first time. There were not yet as many opportunities for girls and women to participate in things like school sports. You were likely to have trouble getting a mortgage as a single woman. And I attended a small, Midwestern university with a decidedly liberal bent (sounds like a letter to Penthouse Forum, doesn't it). All around me people were trying out relationships and, frankly, I felt like the odd man out, so to speak, as a heterosexual. Suddenly all my friends were gay.

I was working in the Residence Life program (for those who don't know, these are students who work in the dormitories and help with the general day-to-day management in exchange for a free single room and a small salary) . . . the dorm director was my friend and she was, at the time, dating a woman (she has since married and has two kids who are probably college grads themselves now). My best friend and I were friends of theirs . . . the 4 of us did everything together.

At their insistence that we certainly were in love, I gave it a go. But while I might have made a decent "political lesbian" (in it for the politics but not the actual sex), girls just aren't my thing. I had some naive misconception that a relationship between women would somehow be loftier. But you still fight about whose house to go to for Thanksgiving and all the same little stuff straight couples grapple with.

Of course, once the barn door is open, so to speak, it's tough to go back to just being friends. But I never liked it. Girls: ewwwww. Yuck. The other three thought I was mean for saying this wasn't for me. At the end of the school year (when she graduated) the couple invited me over for dinner and apologized. "She was nuts," they said.

Funny thing: I went to see a former boyfriend of mine in the midst of all of this. "I'm a LESBIAN!" I wailed on his doorstep. He laughed and said, "Um, I don't think so." The joke was, a few months later, HE slept with her!

He agreed: she was nuts.

And then it was 1981 and that, my friends, was the end of my experimenting.

Maybe I just picked the wrong girl.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 10:38
Can I ask you a personal question? It should be easier to answer than the meaning of life.

Of course.

shurale
23-03-2010, 10:55
Can you peel potatoes?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 11:07
Can you peel potatoes?

Yes, but I am better with a peeler than with a knife.

xSnoofovich
23-03-2010, 11:44
Do you get a chance to explore Lux more than you did Moscow ?

Can you speak any other languages other than English?

xSnoofovich
23-03-2010, 11:50
Do you feel like you have let down the classical women's lib movement of the 70's by not having a job, giving up your freedom as a woman, and subjecting yourself to the slavery of being a typical housewife? What would Gloria Steinem have to say about this?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 12:09
Do you get a chance to explore Lux more than you did Moscow ?

Can you speak any other languages other than English?

1. I actually covered a good deal of Moscow, but from the point-of-view of a housewife. I was very good at taking the Metro places, for example. And since the last summer, I felt I got to see a lot more, too, so I left with few boxes unchecked, so to speak.

I have not yet done very much in Lux, but partly because I am dealing with the details of the move. We have a lease signed, but the movers required a lot of paperwork. I want to buy a bike, as there are plenty of good routes (I already have a book on that), but feel like I need to buy a car, a washing machine, furniture a bit first. I try to take my camera with me even on trips to the grocery store because some of my explorations happen on a rather small scale. The dry cleaner yesterday for example (see the new blog for details if you are interested in minutia).

2. I do think, and I say this sincerely, that I am better at English than many other native speakers. When I got paid to work, I made my living writing in business settings. I call myself a "writer" when i have to choose an occupation.

However, I am not a linguist. I like foreign languages the way I like classical music: it is interesting to me, others are very, very good at it, I admire and respect their skills, but I will never be a concert-level musician.

While I never progressed beyond anything more than "solid beginner" in ANY language, I can say with confidence that my Chinese was always better than my Slovak/Russian skills.

I can generally read a German menu and deal with a restaurant-dining experience without help if the waiter doesn't throw any chitchat at me.

I mangle Spanish the best (living in Argentina, however, I tend to use "vos" and pronounce the double "l" as the Argentines do). When I left there in 2001, I would say I was making good progress . . . I could go to a party with bilingual friends, and they started NOT switching back to English for me. Even now, if you drop me into a Spanish-speaking country, I can get done just about anything I need to do. It won't be pretty, but I can make jokes, I understand the protocol, and if you don't mind my Tarzan-speak Spanish, we can get along.

I studied French in school longer, so I probably read it better than Spanish, but this is the first time I have ever been immersed in it. I did try watching the French version of Top Chef last night. I had to keep waking up Mr Elk to ask if I was getting the drift, however. "Why are they mad? Are they angry or just excited?"

I have French friends who say, "Oh, Ann understands everything!" but it is not true. I find dinner party conversation exhausting, and if I stop focusing intently for even one second, I lose the plot.

That said, this should be very good for me. My kids, who are fluent in French, are thrilled at the idea of helping me. I like to pretend to make mistakes just to drive them nuts . . . mixing up words like shoes (chaussure) and hunter (chasseur) or hair (cheveux) and horse (cheval). We did realize, however, that I had been operating under the assumption that the words for mushroom (champignon) and champion (champion) were the same words. I have thought that since 9th grade French class in 1974. I was making a joke about a French TV quiz show called "Questions for a Champion," calling it "Questions for a Mushroom," and they thought I was really being funny. I was, but *I* thought I was being witty.

Zut, alors.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 12:19
Do you feel like you have let down the classical women's lib movement of the 70's by not having a job, giving up your freedom as a woman, and subjecting yourself to the slavery of being a typical housewife? What would Gloria Steinem have to say about this?

Yup. Every time I find myself cleaning a toilet (which is often), I mutter to myself that the Women's Movement lied to me. They promised me that if I got myself an education (and I think a Master's degree counts), I could hire some OTHER woman to clean my toilet for me.

I am June Cleaver.

I am conflicted about this in many ways. On the one hand, I think I DO have choices my mother's generation did not. On the other hand, I sometimes think that, in our efforts to be taken as seriously as men, we have at times sacrificed our femininity which is not, as I see it, inherently a weakness. American women went through a phase of de-sexualizing themselves in the workplace (those awful ties of the 1980s, for example) to the point where we are not that far from our sisters under the burquas at times.

That said, I always worked for nice companies with nice family-friendly corporate cultures and nice men and never felt I was limited or abused in any way. But certainly there have been women who were.

If I am staying home and playing "house" in some ways by being a traditional mother and home-maker, I have to admit that my education enabled me to do so (by enabling me to cross paths with Mr. Elk). It is my choice as much as it is possible while I am an "accompanying spouse" with no work permit. Perhaps if we were in the US, I might be working full-time now.

I certainly think my choices have resulted in my children being who they are at this point. I was very fortunate to be able to stay home with them, and while they would not have been hurt had I not, I believe they have benefited because I have. If that makes sense.

It is all about balance in the end. And choice. I do call myself a "feminist" without apology. Like the word "liberal," I don't know how those came to be bad things.

shurale
23-03-2010, 12:41
Have you been to Stockholm?
Have you read books by M. Atwood?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 12:47
Have you been to Stockholm?
Have you read books by M. Atwood?

1. No. Copenhagen, but not Stockholm. My mother is a first generation American (her parents were Finns), and, sadly, I have not yet been to Finland either.

2. I read The Handmaid's Tale. I liked it, although it is chilling and depressing. Only other work of hers I have tried was The Blind Assassin, but I couldn't get through it.

shurale
23-03-2010, 13:17
Why haven't you read the other book by Mrs. Artwood? Too depressive?
==
What is the probability that what she described in The Handmaid's Tale
would happen for real in the near future in the USA?
Since you have many people like Pat Robertson and Fred Phelps.

nbogaard
23-03-2010, 13:25
You speak Spanish! Do you like Pablo Neruda? Does it read infinitely better in Spanish than in English?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 13:32
Why haven't you read the other book by Mrs. Artwood? Too depressive?
==
What is the probability that what she described in The Handmaid's Tale
would happen for real in the near future in the USA?
Since you have many people like Pat Robertson and Fred Phelps.

I don't recall. I think it just didn't grab my attention. Or the story-within-the-story part lost me.

While I think there are some seriously screwed up issues within my country, I don't see us sinking to quite the level of The Handmaid's Tale.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 13:39
You speak Spanish! Do you like Pablo Neruda? Does it read infinitely better in Spanish than in English?

LOL. I speak Spanish badly.

I prefer Garcia Marquez, Isabel Allende, and I really, really like Arturo Perez-Reverte. But only, perhaps, because I have not read enough of Neruda.

I read the first of Perez-Reverte's Alatriste novels in Spanish, but the other authors I have only read in English. But I have no doubt that anything written originally in Spanish is better in Spanish.

It is hard to work on reading in Spanish when I am not in a Spanish-speaking country. I feel guilty not focusing on the host country language and depressed I am not getting to spend more time of the Spanish, if that makes sense. It is my favorite foreign language.

nbogaard
23-03-2010, 14:01
I think the only thing I read of Garcia-Marquez was what everyone has read, "One Hundred Years of Solitude," but even that was more than 30 years ago. I love Neruda's, "20 Love Poems and a Song of Despair."

As I have told you in the past, I really like your posts and I am happy that you are happy in Luxembourg.

J.D.
23-03-2010, 14:08
I knew someone was going to ask . . .

The boring answer is that it was the late 1970s, the Women's Movement was a big deal, we were all taking Women's Studies courses for the first time. There were not yet as many opportunities for girls and women to participate in things like school sports. You were likely to have trouble getting a mortgage as a single woman. And I attended a small, Midwestern university with a decidedly liberal bent (sounds like a letter to Penthouse Forum, doesn't it). All around me people were trying out relationships and, frankly, I felt like the odd man out, so to speak, as a heterosexual. Suddenly all my friends were gay.
.

What!?
No pictures?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 14:11
I think the only thing I read of Garcia-Marquez was what everyone has read, "One Hundred Years of Solitude," but even that was more than 30 years ago. I love Neruda's, "20 Love Poems and a Song of Despair."

As I have told you in the past, I really like your posts and I am happy that you are happy in Luxembourg.

You know, I have not read One Hundred Years of Solitude. I did read Love in the Time of Cholera and Chronicle of a Death Foretold. He's not in Kindle format, alas.

I had a dog who we thought resembled Neruda. We didn't name him that, but we sometimes referred to him that way. Same dog resembled the dog in Las Meninas (Las Meninas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:White300byOne.jpg" class="image"><img alt="" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2b/White300byOne.jpg"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/2/2b/White300byOne.jpg).

If you ever make it to Lux, let me know! Even Paris is only 2 hours away by TGV.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 14:14
What!?
No pictures?

LOL.

Sadly, not. Larry Flynt's monthly publication has a page devoted to amateur shots, doesn't it. :ignore:

And I started school as a photography major, too . . . alas, all I can do now is paint with words.

nbogaard
23-03-2010, 14:36
Thanks. I would like that. Don't know that will ever happen but the offer is nice all the same.

xSnoofovich
23-03-2010, 14:42
What is the worst book you have ever read?
What is your least favorite color?
Coffee or tea?

drwho
23-03-2010, 15:19
Goodness! The honor! The pressure!

So sorry I was not checking in. I will do my best to catch up.

1. On landing in the Lux airport? My first thought was "Where is everyone?" There was NO ONE there. The whole drive (17 minutes) into town . . . "Where are all the cars?"
2. The grocery stores, the grocery stores, the grocery stores. My word, but they are beautiful. I still get choked up. But seriously, the fact that things are not open 24/7 is a big difference (the mall slams shut around 7:00 p.m. on Saturday night). And the orderly parking!
3. Shopkeepers were always friendly to me in Moscow (seriously). They are nice here, too. Most are trilingual (French, German, Luxembourgish) and often speak some English, too, so they are very patient with me.
4. Still dealing with the bureaucracy. We were in a panic because we did not turn in some papers within 3 days . . . "Oh, don't worry!" we were told. "This is not Russia!" Yeah, but in Russia, ahem, there's always a way.


in other words DULL. :smurf:

mistygris
23-03-2010, 17:07
That said, this should be very good for me. My kids, who are fluent in French, are thrilled at the idea of helping me. I like to pretend to make mistakes just to drive them nuts . . . mixing up words like shoes (chaussure) and hunter (chasseur) or hair (cheveux) and horse (cheval). We did realize, however, that I had been operating under the assumption that the words for mushroom (champignon) and champion (champion) were the same words. I have thought that since 9th grade French class in 1974. I was making a joke about a French TV quiz show called "Questions for a Champion," calling it "Questions for a Mushroom," and they thought I was really being funny. I was, but *I* thought I was being witty.

Zut, alors.



you ever watched it question pour un champion? it's actually a good show :)

why did you actually move to lux??

Esceptica
23-03-2010, 17:11
To MissAnnElk

How does it feel to be a mum?

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 17:54
What is the worst book you have ever read?
What is your least favorite color?
Coffee or tea?

Mr Elk is currently reading The Alchemist, which I just hated. HATED. And anything by Daniel Baldacci. Ugh.

Least favorite color? Pink, maybe? I like most colors depending on the context.

Coffee most of the time. But there is a place for tea. I really craved jasmine tea during morning sickness. But no milk in tea. You are welcome to it, but I just can't.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 17:56
you ever watched it question pour un champion? it's actually a good show :)

why did you actually move to lux??

We watch it almost every day. It IS a good show. My kids crack up because the big prizes are always books.

Mr. Elk got an offer we couldn't refuse. He never would have heard of it nor would he have been an appropriate candidate had we not spent two years in Moscow. Seriously, at Christmas, we had no plans to move. January 7 or so, a friend sent us an email saying, "You might want to look at this job opening . . ."

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 17:57
in other words DULL. :smurf:

Compared to Moscow, it does run that risk!

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 18:04
To MissAnnElk

How does it feel to be a mum?

Well, as you may or may not know, I came to it late in life. We were married a good ten years before we had our first daughter, which, frankly, I sort of approached as a science experiment: "Gee . . . can I do this?" which at that point just meant "conceive."

By the time she arrived (I was 38), I was convinced this was what I was put on earth to do. . . all the education led up to this. She really was a VERY easy baby or maybe I would have sung a different song, but I really enjoyed those early months. No sleep deprivation, no colic. Just a very mellow, portable kid. A friend of mine says she is "serene," which is true.

Now if she is my "Luxembourg," my second child is my "Moscow." MUCH more interesting, but much more challenging. She came the year I turned 40.

But both of them are bright and lovely and good company. I grumble about getting stuck with them during the school breaks, but they are easy people to live with, all things considered, and they have been very good sports about being dragged around the globe. Both Mr. Elk and I are very proud of them.

shurale
23-03-2010, 20:06
Your pet hate?

nbogaard
23-03-2010, 20:33
Please!!! David Baldacci??? Paulo Coelho??? Maybe Daniele Steele? Is there no end to the drivel?

shurale
23-03-2010, 20:44
Should I shave before going to the club or shouldn't I?

Bels
23-03-2010, 22:18
Do you feel like you have let down the classical women's lib movement of the 70's by not having a job, giving up your freedom as a woman, and subjecting yourself to the slavery of being a typical housewife? What would Gloria Steinem have to say about this?

Lol! A woman say to you they want a child from you. So you have a child from from what was a very professional woman in the past. But she now has a little monster. 2 or three or four years old of who needs their mother and Father very much. Nurseries don't work. and the Mum wants her career back, yet she can't. because she can't. Because the child wants the family life only. Mother and Father when he can be home.

But let's not forget, this woman wanted a child. Yet she doesn't want to kept financially by one husband, Why not we might say? Independance can come later when the child gets older. The point is that you can't have both worlds. And man and wife must work in partnership.

You want a baby, tou can't have it both ways as a women. And one odf us must support the family financially.

Korotky Gennady
23-03-2010, 22:25
Yes, but I am better with a peeler than with a knife.Is it something about handjob ?... By the way what was the longest sexual intercourse you have ?


:D

shurale
23-03-2010, 22:28
Lol! A woman say to you they want a child from you. So you have a child from from what was a very professional woman in the past. But she now has a little monster. 2 or three or four years old of who needs their mother and Father very much. Nurseries don't work. and the Mum wants her career back, yet she can't. because she can't. Because the child wants the family life only. Mother and Father when he can be home.

But let's not forget, this woman wanted a child. Yet she doesn't want to kept financially by one husband, Why not we might say? Independance can come later when the child gets older. The point is that you can't have both worlds. And man and wife must work in partnership.

You want a baby, tou can't have it both ways as a women. And one odf us must support the family financially.

I learned an English word when our teacher showed us a documentary about The Beatles. John, Ringo and George thought that Paul became unbearably didactic.

Bels
23-03-2010, 22:40
I learned an English word when our teacher showed us a documentary about The Beatles. John, Ringo and George thought that Paul became unbearably didactic.

Educate me. What is didatic? Or is it Didastic. Still not a commonly known native English word. Something about teaching. And a crazy word.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 22:57
Your pet hate?

Chosen ignorance. Choosing not to look around and at least trying to see things from someone else's perspective. You don't have to embrace the other ideas, but at least hear them out.

I try very hard myself, although I often fail.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 22:58
Should I shave before going to the club or shouldn't I?

I dunno. I'm partial to that Miami Vice look. But I am dating myself.

I like a goatee, too, although in the US it apparently carries as much respect anymore as a mullet.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 23:02
Is it something about handjob ?... By the way what was the longest sexual intercourse you have ?


:D

I wondered if I missed some sort of innuendo.

Longest? You mean living like John and Yoko, in bed for days? Or one event? It must have been ages ago when I was in my 20s. I recall early on in a courtship, about this time of year (we paused only to watch the NCAA tournaments . . .), coming up for meals and diving back into bed again.

But isn't new love always like that? I hope it is. We should all be having that.

MissAnnElk
23-03-2010, 23:05
I learned an English word when our teacher showed us a documentary about The Beatles. John, Ringo and George thought that Paul became unbearably didactic.


Educate me. What is didatic? Or is it Didastic. Still not a commonly known native English word. Something about teaching. And a crazy word.

I think you mean DIDACTIC.

It means inclined to lecture, but in a long and boring way. I think it has a slightly negative connotation. Too much information. Yawn.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/didactic
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/didactic
Didacticism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Nuvola_apps_bookcase.svg" class="image"><img alt="Stub icon" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a5/Nuvola_apps_bookcase.svg/30px-Nuvola_apps_bookcase.svg.png"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/thumb/a/a5/Nuvola_apps_bookcase.svg/30px-Nuvola_apps_bookcase.svg.png

xSnoofovich
23-03-2010, 23:25
carries as much respect anymore as a mullet.

and mullets are........................... AWE------------some !!

nbogaard
24-03-2010, 07:58
Educate me. What is didatic? Or is it Didastic. Still not a commonly known native English word. Something about teaching. And a crazy word.

Didactic means instructive. Fairly common English word.

shurale
24-03-2010, 14:51
What is your favourite expletive, pls?

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 14:55
What is your favourite expletive, pls?

The F-word.

tvadim133
24-03-2010, 15:02
I like the way you're expressing yourself! :)

How do you call your kids and Mr MissAnnElk and why (if it is possible to answer "why")?

How does your husband business (Job) impact you?

I do not mean, you have to change the place or it gives you an opportunity ot buy smth. But I mean, does your husband discuss his business issues with you?

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 15:13
I like the way you're expressing yourself! :)

How do you call your kids and Mr MissAnnElk and why (if it is possible to answer "why")?

How does your husband business (Job) impact you?

I do not mean, you have to change the place or it gives you an opportunity ot buy smth. But I mean, does your husband discuss his business issues with you?

The kids have lovely names, but both developed nicknames. We did not call the oldest by her real name for ages. Mr. Elk had a colleague who used to give us the business: "That child will never know her names!" I think it is because I always wanted a nickname, but never really had one. Well, Gypsy calls me "Elkers" and sometimes "Beets," which I like.

I call Mr. Elk, "Sir." Doesn't every wife call her husband that?

I think any working person brings home job stress. So for me, it doesn't matter where Mr Elk works or for whom, as long as he isn't made too crazy by it. I prefer not to hear too much about it because client confidentiality is an issue, and I might accidentally blurt something out at the wrong time or nod knowingly suggesting I know what's going on. I get the general mood, but prefer not to have the details.

That said, we talk all the time. Just not about the fine print at the office. I joke that it would be impossible for him to have an affair because we're on the phone all the time. But maybe he can multi-task better than I know. :-)

shurale
24-03-2010, 15:19
The F-word.

Fornicate?

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 15:31
Fornicate?

The 4-letter version.

nbogaard
24-03-2010, 15:47
Are the people who read your blog religiously called, Elkaholics?

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 15:51
Are the people who read your blog religiously called, Elkaholics?

Oohhh! Good one!

I refer to them as "Beet-niks," but this is almost better! Perhaps those from the forum would be Elkaholics since they know me by that moniker.

shurale
24-03-2010, 16:22
The 4-letter version.

Flirt!

nbogaard
24-03-2010, 16:37
Oohhh! Good one!

I refer to them as "Beet-niks," but this is almost better! Perhaps those from the forum would be Elkaholics since they know me by that moniker.

Beetles works too. Wasn't Ann Elk one of the John Cleese characters on Monty Python ages ago?

MickeyTong
24-03-2010, 16:51
Educate me.


We've all been trying hard to do that....

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 16:53
Beetles works too. Wasn't Ann Elk one of the John Cleese characters on Monty Python ages ago?


Yes . . . I posted the clip here on this thread somewhere . . . "This theory, which belongs to me, is mine . . . and what it is, too!"

MickeyTong
24-03-2010, 17:21
How much longer will you and Mr Elk continue your itinerant lifestyle?
Where do you envisage yourselves finally settling?
What are the benefits and drawbacks for your children in having moved frequently?

shurale
24-03-2010, 17:21
Have you worked as an educator?

shurale
24-03-2010, 17:23
Have you both signed a marriage contract?

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 17:42
How much longer will you and Mr Elk continue your itinerant lifestyle?
Where do you envisage yourselves finally settling?
What are the benefits and drawbacks for your children in having moved frequently?

1. Often we sigh and say we are too old for this sh!t. It's one thing when you are in your 20s . . . it's another when you are kicking 50. That said, with apologies to Annie, "I think I'm gonna like it here . . ."

That will guarantee we move in 6 months, eh?

2. I have NO idea. We have the "summer dacha in my ancestral village" (that being a suburb of Columbus, Ohio). However, I have a girlfriend who says that when we are old women, we are going to hang out in the Caribbean with our cats, wear muumuus and all our jewelry at the same time, and harass the cabana boys. I can see that happening.

3. Actually, they haven't moved that often. The oldest one (who is 11) was born in Florida, moved to Buenos Aires when she was 18 months (so she remembers neither), moved to Slovakia at about 3, and then lived there for 7 years before we moved to Moscow. So she remembers Slovakia and Moscow. The younger one was born in Buenos Aires.

The advantages: they definitely understand that there is a world out there where people speak different languages and use different money and have different ways of doing things. My youngest is fascinated by all things Japanese . . . maybe she will study the language and go there. At least she sees that such a wish is possible.

The disadvantages: well, from my point of view, I feel bad that they have not spent more time with our families (but maybe if we lived a few hours away we would not see them any more often?). I sometimes feel bad that they could not as easily have some THINGS. THINGS are hard to move around or pack for an airplane trip. I see gaps in their cultural education as Americans. They know more about Joan of Arc than they do about Abraham Lincoln, for example. Maybe that won't matter at the end of the day.

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 17:51
Have you worked as an educator?

Not sure I ever educated anyone, but yes.

When I was in grad school, we had to teach in exchange for free tuition and a small stipend. I taught composition to freshmen and juniors (first-year and third-year college students). I sometimes wonder if anyone can teach another person to write. I can give you the opportunity, and encouragement, and edit/proof read what you do. But I'm not sure I can teach you how to do it.

I taught English as a Second Language at a technical school in Taiwan for a year (1986-87). It was a requirement for the students, so classes were HUGE (40?) and they were often seated in carols so I could barely see their faces. I do not think it was a very effective program, although I had a good time (I met Mr Elk while I was doing that, even though he had been my brother's college roommate).

Later, I taught writing at a community college for a bit, too.

In Pittsburgh (1992-93) I taught English As a Second Language to adults. It was great fun, but I do not feel qualified to do it on my own without the structure of someone else's curriculum. Further, we were stressing survival skills: speaking and listening rather than reading and writing. I never prepped anyone for exams, for example. And although I have studying English lit and composition, I never studied linguistics or how to teach ESL . . . when I went to school that didn't exist. Well, linguistics did, but there was no such thing as an emphasis on teaching ESL as there is today.

While In Moscow I have engaged in some "conversation practice," but I don't have a lot of interest in it. I tended to turn down offers.

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 17:52
Have you both signed a marriage contract?

???

You mean like a pre-nup? Or an arranged marriage?

No and no.

tvadim133
24-03-2010, 18:50
What kind of literature do you like?

What are your desk books or authors?

What russian novels have your read?

What did you like (why)?

What did you dislike(why)?

TD
24-03-2010, 19:32
The 4-letter version.

Fornication Under Consent of the King - discussion of the origins HERE (http://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/****.asp)

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 19:43
What kind of literature do you like?

What are your desk books or authors?

What russian novels have your read?

What did you like (why)?

What did you dislike(why)?

1. I tend to like contemporary fiction, biographies, travelogues, mysteries, and anything about food. I am currently reading a novel about Juana La Loca (The Last Queen), but before that I just finished Lady Chatterly's Lover (which I didn't much care for). Maybe it doesn't lend itself to being read on a Kindle, either, as I would have liked to have gone back and re-read some of it, but that's sort of hard to do on this device.

Just to give you and idea of what I read, other authors/titles on my Kindle include

The Works of Anton Chekov
It Sucked and then I Cried (by a blogger known as "Dooce")
Case Histories (Kate Atkinson)
One Good Turn (same author)
Long After Midnight at the Nino Bien (about learning tango in Buenos Aires)
The Lost Symbol (Dan Brown)
Supreme Courtship (Christopher Buckley . . . VERY funny)
One Fifth Avenue (Candace Bushnell)
My Life in France (Julia Child)
The Madonnas of Leningrad
The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao
The Girl of His Dreams (Donna Leon)
Finger Lickin' Fifteen (Janet Evanovich . . . a very funny series)
The Russian Concubine
Dead Until Dark (better than Twilight, I thought)
The English Major (Jim Harrison)
Running with the Bulls (Valerie Hemingway)
Scat (Carl Hiaasen . . . a South Florida boy, very funny)
Juliet, Naked (Nick Hornby)
On Becoming Fearless (Arianna Huffington)
Midnight in Madrid/Conspiracy in Kiev (Noel Hynd . . . they were not very good)
Last Night in Twisted River (John Irving)
The Kommandant's Girl
The Secret Life of Bees
The Stieg Larsson "Girl . . ." mysteries
The Given Day (Dennis Lehane)
Born to Run (very interesting . . . about distance/endurance running)
Perfection (Juliet Metz, a memoir)
Homage to Catalonia (Orwell)
Cleaving (Julia Powell)
At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream (Wade Rouse . . . gay couple moves to the woods)
That Old Cape Magic (Richard Russo)
Petite Anglaise (another blogger . . .)
Dead Watch (John Sandford . . . another mystery writer I like)
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
A BUNCH of Daniel Silva novels including Moscow Rules
Six Suspects (by the guy who wrote Slumdog Millionaire)
Defiance (about the Bielski partisans . . . not well written, but interesting)
The Right Stuff (Tom Wolfe)
Ghost Train to the Eastern Star (Paul Theroux)
Too Close to the Sun (biography of Denys Finch Hatton . . . the love interest in Out of Africa)

2. You know, I am ashamed to admit I have not read any Russian novels! Only short stories by Chekov. And I've seen Dr. Zhivago and Anna Karenina. Started Master and Margarita a few times, but never got through it. I think the symbolism and cultural references are lost on me.

Oh, you know, I have read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.

I know all the Russians on the forum are smacking their foreheads in horror.

shurale
24-03-2010, 20:19
2. You know, I am ashamed to admit I have not read any Russian novels! Only short stories by Chekov. And I've seen Dr. Zhivago and Anna Karenina. Started Master and Margarita a few times, but never got through it. I think the symbolism and cultural references are lost on me.

Oh, you know, I have read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.

I know all the Russians on the forum are smacking their foreheads in horror.

Some Tatars too.

Korotky Gennady
24-03-2010, 20:35
Oohhh! Good one!

I refer to them as "Beet-niks," but this is almost better! Perhaps those from the forum would be Elkaholics since they know me by that moniker.

I know that beatniks were american intellectuals of the late 50s and 60s... who liked marijuana and sex for free... :)

What sense have you put in the word "Beet-niks" ? :eh:


And what reader of your blog is the most wanted by you ? How could you imagine your ideal reader ?

Korotky Gennady
24-03-2010, 20:37
Some Tatars too.some americans also.

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 20:41
Does Gary Shteyngart count?

shurale
24-03-2010, 20:45
I know that beetniks were american intellectuals of the late 50s and 60s... who liked marijuana and sex for free... :)

What sense have you put in the word "Beet-niks" ? :eh:


And what reader of your blog is the most wanted by you ? How could you imagine your ideal reader ?

Beet is a plant they make white sugar.
Nik doesn't mean really anything, they just borrowed it from Russian and stick it to English words.
Like peacenik. Someone who is fighting for peace.
Beet is red inside. Sugar derived from it is white and sweet.
Red, white, sweet.
Is it something about White Supremacy?

Korotky Gennady
24-03-2010, 21:04
Beet is a plant they make white sugar.

?


I know what Beet is. It's not good.

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 21:11
I know that beetniks were american intellectuals of the late 50s and 60s... who liked marijuana and sex for free... :)

What sense have you put in the word "Beet-niks" ? :eh:

And what reader of your blog is the most wanted by you ? How could you imagine your ideal reader ?

It comes from the Beat Movement, which I cannot seem to provide links to because I cannot get Wikipedia to respond. ARGH! They referred to themselves as "Beatniks."

Since the blog is "The Beet Goes On" (with apologies to Sonny & Cher), the readers become "Beet-niks."

My ideal reader? I always think of my friend, Meghan when I write. I used to work with her, and she was so funny and yet so normal. Her family is crazy, and she seems to cope. I haven't seen her in years, but she is my ideal reader: close to my age, also a mother, avid reader.

MissAnnElk
24-03-2010, 21:17
I got these links to work, re "Beatnik."

I didn't realize Jack Kerouac coined the term (another author I have not yet read).

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/beatnik

http://www.answers.com/topic/beatnik

Korotky Gennady
24-03-2010, 21:19
and she was so funny and yet so normal.
.


Yeah, every normal one is funny.





Since the blog is "The Beet Goes On" (with apologies to Sonny & Cher), the readers become "Beet-niks."


.

Oh... I see...

I always knew that you have sense of Humor.

Bels
24-03-2010, 21:48
Searching the expression The beet goes on by Missannelik it appears the expression is unique for her only, and she will be searched on google immediately. The search moves on to The beat goes on sung by Madonna.

For phrases we must use our imigination. In some cases we can create our own more modern phrases. and that is what a good writer should. It is up to your own imagination as to what it will mean.

The nearest I found was from Madonna. The beat goes on. http://www.metrolyrics.com/the-beat-goes-on-lyrics-madonna.html

LOL! Just found a better one. Sonny and Cher! From youtube of all places. The beat goes on.
YouTube- Sonny & Cher - The Beat Goes On

YouTube- Sonny & Cher - The Beat Goes On



However Missannelik will almost be remembered as The beet goes on
And eventually like all phrases, it will develop its own real meaning, as it develops.

Bels
24-03-2010, 22:02
Yes the beat goes on.

YouTube- The Beat Goes On..Tribute to Leonard Peltier

robertmf
25-03-2010, 00:09
I got these links to work, re "Beatnik."

I didn't realize Jack Kerouac coined the term (another author I have not yet read).

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/beatnik

http://www.answers.com/topic/beatnik

On The Road is rather a classic for ..ahem.. a certain age group :)

MickeyTong
25-03-2010, 02:40
"Finger Licking Fifteen"??????????


Is that legal?

robertmf
25-03-2010, 02:49
"Finger Licking Fifteen"??????????


Is that legal?

Yes :hooray: It refers to either Lolita or Catcher In The Rye :)

drwho
25-03-2010, 08:50
1. I tend to like contemporary fiction, biographies, travelogues, mysteries, and anything about food. I am currently reading a novel about Juana La Loca (The Last Queen), but before that I just finished Lady Chatterly's Lover (which I didn't much care for). Maybe it doesn't lend itself to being read on a Kindle, either, as I would have liked to have gone back and re-read some of it, but that's sort of hard to do on this device.

Just to give you and idea of what I read, other authors/titles on my Kindle include

The Works of Anton Chekov
It Sucked and then I Cried (by a blogger known as "Dooce")
Case Histories (Kate Atkinson)
One Good Turn (same author)
Long After Midnight at the Nino Bien (about learning tango in Buenos Aires)
The Lost Symbol (Dan Brown)
Supreme Courtship (Christopher Buckley . . . VERY funny)
One Fifth Avenue (Candace Bushnell)
My Life in France (Julia Child)
The Madonnas of Leningrad
The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao
The Girl of His Dreams (Donna Leon)
Finger Lickin' Fifteen (Janet Evanovich . . . a very funny series)
The Russian Concubine
Dead Until Dark (better than Twilight, I thought)
The English Major (Jim Harrison)
Running with the Bulls (Valerie Hemingway)
Scat (Carl Hiaasen . . . a South Florida boy, very funny)
Juliet, Naked (Nick Hornby)
On Becoming Fearless (Arianna Huffington)
Midnight in Madrid/Conspiracy in Kiev (Noel Hynd . . . they were not very good)
Last Night in Twisted River (John Irving)
The Kommandant's Girl
The Secret Life of Bees
The Stieg Larsson "Girl . . ." mysteries
The Given Day (Dennis Lehane)
Born to Run (very interesting . . . about distance/endurance running)
Perfection (Juliet Metz, a memoir)
Homage to Catalonia (Orwell)
Cleaving (Julia Powell)
At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream (Wade Rouse . . . gay couple moves to the woods)
That Old Cape Magic (Richard Russo)
Petite Anglaise (another blogger . . .)
Dead Watch (John Sandford . . . another mystery writer I like)
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
A BUNCH of Daniel Silva novels including Moscow Rules
Six Suspects (by the guy who wrote Slumdog Millionaire)
Defiance (about the Bielski partisans . . . not well written, but interesting)
The Right Stuff (Tom Wolfe)
Ghost Train to the Eastern Star (Paul Theroux)
Too Close to the Sun (biography of Denys Finch Hatton . . . the love interest in Out of Africa)

2. You know, I am ashamed to admit I have not read any Russian novels! Only short stories by Chekov. And I've seen Dr. Zhivago and Anna Karenina. Started Master and Margarita a few times, but never got through it. I think the symbolism and cultural references are lost on me.

Oh, you know, I have read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.

I know all the Russians on the forum are smacking their foreheads in horror.

How do you find time to read all of that? I love reading but only do it when on holiday and grab airport trash before I go.

Luxembourg for Moscow - want to trade places !!! PLEASE ! DULL it ain't here but DULL Is good, give me clean air less people dull :vomit:

shurale
25-03-2010, 11:52
"Finger Licking Fifteen"??????????


Is that legal?

Legal in Cz. Come I will introduce you to my young friends :10310:

MissAnnElk
25-03-2010, 14:15
"Finger Licking Fifteen"??????????


Is that legal?

If only. It's the 15th book in this series. The protagonist stops regularly at a fictitious fast food chicken joint called Cluck in a Bucket.

MissAnnElk
25-03-2010, 14:18
How do you find time to read all of that? I love reading but only do it when on holiday and grab airport trash before I go.

Luxembourg for Moscow - want to trade places !!! PLEASE ! DULL it ain't here but DULL Is good, give me clean air less people dull :vomit:

I bought the Kindle last summer, and I have NOT read everything that is on it.

But I try to follow the advice of Stephen King who says to always, always carry a book with you because there are always a few minutes during the day when you can read. I used to read on the Metro (including the escalator). Now I read when I am sitting in the car waiting for kids. Plus before bed (not having much on the teevee right now helps, too).

I read a lot more now that I have the Kindle because it is light and easy to carry (but the severe cold is an issue . . . I did not always take it outside in the winter in Moscow and you would not want to leave it in a car overnight).

nbogaard
25-03-2010, 15:22
Couldn't agree more. I love my Kindle. A little annoyed with Amazon right now for raising the prices two months after I bought mine but what are you gonna do?

TD
25-03-2010, 16:03
I bought the Kindle last summer, and I have NOT read everything that is on it.

I have been reading ebooks since the first greyscale screen Palm came out :-)

First switch from the Palm format was two Christmases ago when I got an iPod Touch. This week I moved from there to my Google android phone. Lots of hype about the iPad as a book reader, but keep in mind there are a ton (up to 50) of other tablet devices coming out this year - many running the android system.

Just seems like for the money its better to get a multi-functional device than strictly a book reader.

nbogaard
25-03-2010, 16:30
I have tried reading on a computer and I find that I cannot do it for long. I get to where my eyes are burning a bit and I need to stop. I get none of that on my Kindle and without actually trying an iPad and reading a book on it, I would not spend the money on one. My other concern about the iPad is its size. One of the things I like about the Kindle is that it fits snugly in a jacket pocket. The larger size is inconvenient for me.

shurale
26-03-2010, 11:50
1. I think both of your little ones are pre-teens. How do you chastise them? With a palm? With a hairbrush? With cooking utensils? With the rod of correction?
2. Do you like "Summertime"? Whose cover is the best, of Billie Holiday, Jannis Joplin, or do you prefer other singer?
3. How do your children call you? Mama, mummy, ma....?

MissAnnElk
26-03-2010, 12:54
1. I think both of your little ones are pre-teens. How do you chastise them? With a palm? With a hairbrush? With cooking utensils? With the rod of correction?
2. Do you like "Summertime"? Whose cover is the best, of Billie Holiday, Jannis Joplin, or do you prefer other singer?
3. How do your children call you? Mama, mummy, ma....?

1. We have a "No Hitting" policy Chez Elk. That does not mean we do not have a discipline policy. Generally speaking, because we have been on the kids' case about appropriate behavior since Day 1, all I have to do any more is glare over the top of my glasses. We have both raised our voices, and recently, but that is it. We have removed privileges for bad behavior (one of the arguments for giving the girls Nintendo DSs was that I can take them away if someone is a Doodle). Really, most of the time I can just talk to them . . . here is why your behavior is inappropriate, here is why I need for you NOT to do that, here is your sister's point of view, here is evidence that you need to get more sleep.

I really have always believed that a kid who feels right, acts right. And that means a set bedtime during school.

2. I like the song "Summertime," but I don't really care for "Porgy and Bess." Historically, as a piece of art, I respect it. But I like other works by Gershwin, particularly his orchestral works, SO much better. The entire soundtrack to Woody Allen's movie "Manhattan" is an excellent place to start if you are not familiar with Gershwin.

3. My kids call me "Mama" and "Mam-o." Also, "Hey, you, will you come pay for this?"

tvadim133
26-03-2010, 13:11
In Russia, due to different reasons and circumstances, different generations of a family can and live togerther in one appartment or a house for ages.

The tendency when kids are 18 y.o (at least 24 y.o and after university), they leave their paretns and have independent ways of life, is developing here.

Would you like in future to have a very big house where all can live togerther: you, your kids, their spouses, their children, all their dogs, cats?

nbogaard
26-03-2010, 15:29
I'll be damned! There really is a language, "Luxembourgish." I thought you were pulling our legs. Google says it is a germanic language. Is it close enough to German that if you speak german, you can understand Luxembourgish?

shurale
26-03-2010, 16:26
I'll be damned! There really is a language, "Luxembourgish." I thought you were pulling our legs. Google says it is a germanic language. Is it close enough to German that if you speak german, you can understand Luxembourgish?

English is a Germanic language. Haus - house, Laus - louse, Maus - mouse have the same pronunciation.

MissAnnElk
26-03-2010, 17:45
In Russia, due to different reasons and circumstances, different generations of a family can and live togerther in one appartment or a house for ages.

The tendency when kids are 18 y.o (at least 24 y.o and after university), they leave their paretns and have independent ways of life, is developing here.

Would you like in future to have a very big house where all can live togerther: you, your kids, their spouses, their children, all their dogs, cats?

The American tradition is that about college age the kids move out and, hopefully, leave the nest for good although the reality is somewhat different. Some parents actually insist and say things like, "When you turn 18 and move out, and you will . . ." I always thought that was awful.

That said, I look forward to having more privacy again some day. I suppose my ideal, and we have something like it in the "ancestral village," is that everyone lives within a few blocks of each other. My dad lives in our house. My brother and his family live across the street, and my mother is around the corner. My other brother is 2 hours away, so that sort of doesn't work, but you get the idea. I like the idea of doing dinners together a few times a week and watching each other's kids, etc.

MissAnnElk
26-03-2010, 17:55
I'll be damned! There really is a language, "Luxembourgish." I thought you were pulling our legs. Google says it is a germanic language. Is it close enough to German that if you speak german, you can understand Luxembourgish?

NO! I wasn't joking! :-)

My understanding is that after WWII, the people of Luxembourg refused to continue to speak German, adopting, instead, a local dialect. It has only recently been taught and written down.

Wikipedia says this:

Spoken Luxembourgish is relatively hard to understand for speakers of German who are generally not familiar with Moselle Franconian dialects, though they can usually read the language. For those Germans familiar with Moselle Franconian dialects, it is relatively easy to understand Luxembourgish, but more difficult to speak it properly because of the French influence. Even literary German, as it is written in Luxembourg, tends to include many French words and phrases.
Luxembourgish language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Wikipedia-logo.png" class="image" title="Wikipedia"><img alt="Wikipedia" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Wikipedia-logo.png/45px-Wikipedia-logo.png"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/thumb/6/63/Wikipedia-logo.png/45px-Wikipedia-logo.png

Here is your first lesson:
YouTube- Luxembourgish Lesson 1


English is a Germanic language. Haus - house, Laus - louse, Maus - mouse have the same pronunciation.

If I remember my history correctly, the Norman Conquest in 1066 caused the language to change and bring a larger Norman (ie French) influence to it. Hence we have a lot of words that means the same thing, but come from different sources (ie. beef comes from French, but cattle/cow comes from German). What was spoken of and dealt with at Court, tended to have the French influences.

See here: http://hel.espacioblog.com/post/2006/07/30/the-norman-conquest-english-language-after-1066-part-i-
http://www.anglik.net/englishlanguagehistory.htm

TD
26-03-2010, 18:08
I like the song "Summertime," but I don't really care for "Porgy and Bess.

Sublime has a nice cover of that song -->

YouTube- Sublime - Doin' Time/Summertime

shurale
27-03-2010, 00:05
Do you use corner time?

MissAnnElk
27-03-2010, 00:08
Do you use corner time?

No. We used "banning" with the oldest one when she was about 2-3. If she was a butt head, we banned her from whatever room we were in. In about 5 minutes (or less) she was ready to behave.

Kraven Morehead
27-03-2010, 00:35
If you could have an extra appendage, what would it be and why?

Who is do you think would be the sexist pope?

What is the strangest thing you eaten? Did it taste good?

nbogaard
27-03-2010, 07:41
No. We used "banning" with the oldest one when she was about 2-3. If she was a butt head, we banned her from whatever room we were in. In about 5 minutes (or less) she was ready to behave.

Oh, what a good idea! Banning. I'll try it with Sophia. I'll let you know how it works.

MissAnnElk
27-03-2010, 09:57
If you could have an extra appendage, what would it be and why?

Who is do you think would be the sexist pope?

What is the strangest thing you eaten? Did it taste good?

1. Hmmm. I think a prehensile tail would be fun. Then I could hang from a tree by it. Would come in handy at parties, too when you need a hand for the plate, a hand for your drink, and a hand for the fork.

2. Who WOULD be the sexiest pope? Madonna, of course. Right?

3. I ate an emu egg once. Scrambled. Tasted like scrambled eggs. I've had squirrel (ixnay on that! Or maybe if it had been cooked longer). Conch fritters (I love those) and gator in Florida. Sea cucumber in Taiwan (although I think I just pushed that around on my plate . . . ugh). This is an excellent question!

MissAnnElk
27-03-2010, 09:59
Oh, what a good idea! Banning. I'll try it with Sophia. I'll let you know how it works.

Really, they want to be with you. We would go in our bedroom (in that apartment that is where the TV was, so it was double torture for her) and tell her "No, you can't come in." and shut the door. OH! She HATED that.

Once or twice I turned her highchair around so she was facing away from us during a meal. That worked, too.

nbogaard
27-03-2010, 10:11
That is such a great idea! Thanks. I also want to thank you for being in the hot seat. I think you have done a great job. Your answers are unfailingly honest and very witty. I have enjoyed it thoroughly. I really wish our families had gotten to know one another while you were here in Moscow.

MissAnnElk
28-03-2010, 23:03
Thanks. It was fun and you all asked really interesting questions.

So now I will pass the torch!