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Marvo
08-12-2009, 19:01
I am 48 years old and a dual UK/US citizen. I have lived most of my life in the UK. I am fed up of it, it is so depressing, everyone seems stressed out, miserable (live in South Wales), and in debt, and worse it is getting. Are people more optimistic about their future in Russia? I am thinking of studying the language like hell for a two or three years and then moving over there. Not for the money, but for a better life. I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something. What do you think? Do you think it is a good move? :rolleyes: Or is my imagination getting the better of me?

Ian G
08-12-2009, 19:25
Hello Marvo- Welcome to the forum!

The problem is a global one really- there are nice places to live- villages with clean air and green hills and wooden houses, fish in the lake and large mammals in the forest, but limited infrastructure, no guarantee of Internet access, and high unemployment. The same in Russia as in Britain- if you want to support yourself you'll have to live in a city, in a small (at least at first) flat, wihout fire or bicycle. And if that city's Moscow then it has its own brand of stress - mainly due to the sheer number of people.

There are people who live outside the city in a nice house and a nice area and commute in- but typically they spend hours a day driving or commuting.

A lot of people who come here from abroad love Russia- and you can get a good feel for that by reading a lot of the threads on this site.

The single most popular route is to come here as an English teacher for a school who gives you a flat and visa etc and take it from there. Within a year or so you will likely have your own private students and income, or maybe a job offer in some other area of work, and a good idea of whether you like it enough to stay here longer.

But- as I mentioned earlier, if your dream is rural life, then it would be difficult to manage as a foreigner here, purely because of the lack of work. Like many places in the world young people leave the villages to go to the cities, leaving the villages with an ageing and often heavy-drinking population.

Having said that- many people live in a city like Moscow but spend their weekends in the country, at least in the Summer.

So- welcome, and browse arounfd the forum, and try and get a feel of the general mood amongst people who've come to live here. generally you'll find it's pretty positive.

trebor
08-12-2009, 20:56
First, i have to mention that Russia is in deep sh*t at the moment and the average Russian is suffering far more than the average Brit. They were before the financial crisis now it's even worse. So, from the point of view of the average citizen Russia and UK are not even in the same league.
However, if you are coming as an expat and can provide yourself with a good standard of living, Russia can be a very full filling experience

You didn't mention what you do for a living.
Without a job and a work visa it is difficult to stay anyway. If you get a business visa you will have to leave every 3 months and can only return after another 3 months.

This subject is always hotly debated on here but in my view you would need access to at least 2,000 US per month (better 2,500) to have anything like a reasonable life. Russians can survive on a lot less but you are not Russian. Look through previous posts for an idea of costs.
Then language is difficult and would be the next single biggest problem in the beginning.

How much do you know about Russia? Have you lived outside the UK/USA before? If not it will be a massive cultural shock.
Is a woman involved in your decision? If so that could be an advantage. If not, living, trying to survive and look for work in a new country like Russia can be hard on your own, if not impossible at the moment.

Give a bit more information and it will be easier to help. You could come over on a business visa, stay for 3 months and see if you like it first.

Moskauerin
08-12-2009, 21:15
Hi Marvo and Welcome!
Being a native Russian, I can say that you are a brave person to change your life like this. It is a good idea to study Russian, but how are you going to do it in Wales? Are there courses with native speakers, etc.?
IanG is absolutely right that as a foreigner you can hardly count on a peaceful rural life in Russia. All good jobs are in bigger cities. If Moscow is too crowded/ expensive for you, try St.-Petersburg. It should be quieter, although the climate is worse than in Moscow.
On the whole, just keep an eye on our local news, and you will see that the life here is not much happier than all over the rest of the world.
If you are looking just for happiness, it may be not such a good idea to move at all.
A good point was raised by Trebor: what is your profession? Highly qualified specialists are valued and financially appreciated everywhere. If you want to try your luck as a teacher, it depends how things will work for you.
Think it all over well!

Marvo
15-12-2009, 19:54
Thank you all for your advice, I am an electrician by trade but I think if I decide to go to Russia I will first have to become proficient at the language and try and find something else. You seem to be unanimous on the fact that I will have to live in the city, something I am not used to, although I did live in London for a couple of years when I was in my 20s. My son is doing Russian in school and I have been learning a bit whilst helping him, but still very much in the early stages. I think I will not rush into this, learn the language first and go from there. I am told that even if I dont go to Russia, it is worth learning the language because you can get a good job over here with it, we will see.

Dasvidania

Steve:inlove::D

GaNozri
15-12-2009, 20:06
.............the average Russian is suffering far more than the average Brit.

Where do you get your information? Kathoey?

I'm an average Russian, and I'm not suffering at all. Neither is anyone I know.
Overall, average standard of living is lower in Russia than UK, but that does NOT mean that Russians are suffering. We just don't give a f%ck! No mortgages, very little, or no debt, and a live-for-today attitude is what gives us the edge.

As for Brit's: "Quite desparation is the English way".

AndreyS
15-12-2009, 20:20
Where do you get your information? Kathoey?

I'm an average Russian, and I'm not suffering at all. Neither is anyone I know.
Overall, average standard of living is lower in Russia than UK, but that does NOT mean that Russians are suffering. We just don't give a ****! No mortgages, very little, or no debt, and a live-for-today attitude is what gives us the edge.

As for Brit's: "Quite desparation is the English way".

Dear Ganozri, let me correct it pls: "Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way". Sorry Brits, it's not me who thought it up.
Otherwise, agreed!

Bels
15-12-2009, 20:31
The easiest and most relaxing path. And this is what you should do in your case.

First of all take the CELTA or Trinity course in your area. They are the teaching courses that are recognised throughout the world including the UK. There will be such a course near where you live. It costs about 1,000 GBP, and will take a month fulltime to complete. You can also come to Moscow and take the course here.

When you have completed this course apply from your own country, to get the full package. For newbies to Russia I have always recommended BKC or Languge Link. If any other members can recommend somewhere else who can offer a better package for newbies, I would like to hear from them. Yes you will be provided with some form of accommadation from these employers, and yes in a flat in Moscow.

So in gaining your TEFL certificate , and working for either of these companies for about six months, you can start feeling whether Russia is for you. If it is, perhaps you can progrees by getting your own Dacha in the country, and teaching local students English in your own dacha. It might work.

But to summarise, you should give it a try. Come to Russia and find out if you like it. If you discover it is not for you? At least you gave it a try. You will never know, unless you make the decision to find out.

Bogatyr
15-12-2009, 22:08
Marvo, check your PM.

Bogatyr
15-12-2009, 22:34
I am 48 years old and a dual UK/US citizen. I have lived most of my life in the UK. I am fed up of it, it is so depressing, everyone seems stressed out, miserable (live in South Wales), and in debt, and worse it is getting. Are people more optimistic about their future in Russia? I am thinking of studying the language like hell for a two or three years and then moving over there. Not for the money, but for a better life. I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something. What do you think? Do you think it is a good move? :rolleyes: Or is my imagination getting the better of me?

Given all you've written, coming to Moscow to get a "flavor of Russia" is probably not going to suit you. You'll get a flavor all right -- but maybe not the one you want (quite possibly just more of the same that you're trying to escape from).

One way to live in the countryside sustainably is to be a rabotnik (pro-bono worker) for a Russian Orthodox church or monastery. You get room and board in return for your labor. I'm sure an electrician would be most welcome. The conditions can be quite spartan but if you're serious about a shack and a fire making you happy then that may be the way for you. Being proficient in the language would really help, that's for sure.

trebor
16-12-2009, 05:14
Where do you get your information? Kathoey?

I'm an average Russian, and I'm not suffering at all. Neither is anyone I know.
Overall, average standard of living is lower in Russia than UK, but that does NOT mean that Russians are suffering. We just don't give a f%ck! No mortgages, very little, or no debt, and a live-for-today attitude is what gives us the edge.

As for Brit's: "Quite desparation is the English way".

I think you will find that Russia has been harder hit by the financial crisis than Britain. Unemployment is higher in Russia.
Have you ever heard the saying "Moscow isn't Russia"?

Yulichka
16-12-2009, 14:58
Russia Today (tv channel) often do features about foreigners who move to Russia, sometimes living in the middle of nowhere, working on a farm, with only wolves and bears for company ;) check it out, maybe you will become inspired!

Marvo
01-03-2010, 00:30
Spaciba everyone for your helpful and informative replies. We have RT here on TV and it is a good channel. Last week I met a very big Ukrainian at my local market and tried out a bit of Yazzik Pa Russcii on him. He seemed to like it and put his arm around my shoulders, he said that they like western Europeans in Russia and that they would invite me to their homes to drink Vodka with them! Bit of an exageration perhaps. He was a very friendly chap and was wearing a cross on a chain around his neck. Mind you, you cant go putting your arm around another guy here without getting some odd looks. I can assure you all that I am very straight indeed. Maya zena found it quite amusing. Then coincidentally I met another Russian, this time a lady serving in the hospital cafe. I thought she was Russian because she said cuffie instead of coffee. So I said pazalsta and asked for chai for maya padrooga and coffie for me, but I couldnt have done a very good job because the order came back wrong! Well, until later Ochen Rad and Dasvidania everyone. :wavey:

spmoscow
01-03-2010, 00:37
I think you will find that Russia has been harder hit by the financial crisis than Britain. Unemployment is higher in Russia.
Have you ever heard the saying "Moscow isn't Russia"?

I agree "Moscow isn't Russia".
So please decide you are coming for Moscow or Russia:bong:

IvanInMoscow
02-03-2010, 02:29
Marvo,

With all due respect...

You are right. Your imagination is getting the better of you.

What about financial security? Will you be able to return to UK and resume your life after some months in Russia (in case it doesn't work out for you)?

What about your family? Are they ready/willing to go to the place that lacks basic concepts and comforts such as human rights, decent health care, roads? Your kid(s) may adapt somewhat quickly (young people are like that), but what about your lady?

(What I am trying to say is, Are you crazy :nut:?)

Having said all that, DO consider coming here. What :9456:? Yeah, I am serious. If you are seriously thinking about coming here and the above concerns have been addressed (as well as the host of others that I didn't mention), that just may be because it's a good idea. I spent a large part of my life abroad, and that gave me quite a few advantages. Learning another language is fun. Learning another culture is even more fun, but moreover, it gives you an opportunity to look at your own from outside, as it were. There are things that you will reject, others you will appreciate more then ever. And that is just a tip of an iceberg of enriching experiences you are likely to get here.

I am glad you mentioned that you aren't coming for the money. While Moscow is notorious for it's high prices and even higher pay to top-tier managerial material from abroad, that is not for "regular folk". Plus, some of those things quickly become a thing of pre-crisis past. Teachers here may do fairly well (by some standards), but the hours can be crazy. Rent (I am not even talking about buying real estate in Moscow) is high. Anything outside of Moscow or any other relatively large city is uncharted territory...

I am also glad that you are seeking better life. It is not likely that you will find streams of money flowing your way here. I doubt that you will witness many examples of serenity in always-hectic Moscow. There is severe lack of good prospects for career/development outside Moscow (and other big cities) and, as a result, hopelessness reigns in what we call periphery (with alcoholism rampant as a consequence). Still, a person who is serious about moving to Russia could be invigorated by such experience.

Do I sound encouraging? I am trying to be... :)

If you will still consider this wild idea, here's my advice: Think it through, work out smallest details, have a contingency plan for every step of the way, never despair, and always feel free to ask for help, info, and/or opinions here. We will try to help out to our best abilities.

Good luck.

P.S. Imagine how hard it was for me (some would consider me an evangelical christian) not to tell you that happiness is found in Jesus :). If you do have any questions on this particular topic, feel free to PM me.

retype
04-08-2010, 00:28
I am 48 years old and a dual UK/US citizen. I have lived most of my life in the UK. I am fed up of it, it is so depressing, everyone seems stressed out, miserable (live in South Wales), and in debt, and worse it is getting. Are people more optimistic about their future in Russia? I am thinking of studying the language like hell for a two or three years and then moving over there. Not for the money, but for a better life. I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something. What do you think? Do you think it is a good move? :rolleyes: Or is my imagination getting the better of me?
Russian people think the same about moving to the UK and the US

mesugener
05-08-2010, 18:37
among other things do not count on becoming a translator in 3 years, u will need at least 10, besides there is plenty of fine translators out here allow u to take away their jobs

celt25
18-08-2010, 09:59
just have a try. No doubt, life is different in Russia.

SunJazz
19-08-2010, 21:03
I am 48 years old and a dual UK/US citizen. I have lived most of my life in the UK. I am fed up of it, it is so depressing, everyone seems stressed out, miserable (live in South Wales), and in debt, and worse it is getting. Are people more optimistic about their future in Russia? I am thinking of studying the language like hell for a two or three years and then moving over there. Not for the money, but for a better life. I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something. What do you think? Do you think it is a good move? :rolleyes: Or is my imagination getting the better of me?
It all depends!:) you know, some people in Russia think the same about thier country (that people here seem stressed out, miserable and so on), but some are optimistic and just enjoy their living. The grass is always greener:) I lived and worked in the UK last year and I was quite happy there though some may say it was not the best circumstances.. but as for the language I would recommend to come to Russia and study the language here. It's easier and faster 'cos you practise 24/7. You just need to find a good teacher;) and it's always modern real language. In the UK it's quite difficult to find a good teacher who could teach you proper modern Russian (would be great if you could find native speaker who keeps in touch with modern Russia)

Good luck!

annasophia
20-08-2010, 11:25
among other things do not count on becoming a translator in 3 years, u will need at least 10, besides there is plenty of fine translators out here allow u to take away their jobs

I'm assuming you're not one of them.....:rolleyes:

Gypsy
20-08-2010, 11:36
Dear Ganozri, let me correct it pls: "Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way". Sorry Brits, it's not me who thought it up.
Otherwise, agreed!

No, it was an englishman who wrote it - and very true it is too.

Marvo - learn the language then come and visit. Then come again. You are in no position to say whether it is a good move or a bad one until you have experienced it for a while. There is much that is very different here that will initially surprise you - some better, some worse - but just think of them as different, and some might be 'deal-breakers' for you. So take your time, visit and get to know the place before you commit yourself.

If you learn the language visit a few times and decide against it, you have lost nothing - you know another language and you've had a great experience. Go for it.

eplesner
07-09-2010, 18:02
Good luck with you ambition to change your life. If you want simple living, try to avoid Moscow and Sct Petersburg for the reasons giving above. If you go to mid-sized cities, you should be aware that it will be extremely difficult to survive without knowledge of Russian language at least at elementary level. Having a local friend who speaks english will be instrumental.

Try search for "friend" or "penpal" on the Russian-European dating sites and make your intentions crystal clear (being if you want a lover or if you want a friend, and that you want to move to Russia).

In the smaller places it is quite easy to get in touch with local people, once you know 250 words of Russian. This is much more difficult in Moscow and S-P.

I can share my personal experiences with a number of mid-sized Russian cities if there is any interest.

LarushkaKorol
08-09-2010, 14:23
good idea


I can suggest to rent inexpensive apartment in suburb of Moscow. Will get acquainted with features of a true Russian life, trips on transport and people from the Russian small court yard.



I have 1 room apartment for renting 1 day in a city Zhukovsky (25 km from Moscow) Zhukovsky - the well-known city of pilots. You can reach there by train (50 minutes from the Yaroslavl, Kazan and Leningrad station, 30 minutes from metro Vyhino) or the bus (50 minutes from metro Vyhino or Kuzminki). The apartment is in historical city centre. Windows and a balcony leave on pine wood. Nearby park, church, hospital, shops. In apartment there is a furniture, the TV. The ware and bed-clothes is given. The price of 2000 roubles for days, 1800 roubles a day from 2 days + pledge (500 roubles) Consists the contract. We can meet you at the airport.

Ph.: 8926 2532456 elena AN e-mail: elena2121980@mail.ru Hello,

Friday
30-09-2010, 14:17
Russian people think the same about moving to the UK and the US

And those who did are thinking - are there any better places in the world than the UK and Russia;-). Grass is always greener on the other side.

IGIT
30-09-2010, 17:39
It's hard for me to believe that people would want to leave the UK for Russia.

Ftoddfordham
30-09-2010, 18:13
Hello Marvo- Welcome to the forum!

The problem is a global one really- there are nice places to live- villages with clean air and green hills and wooden houses, fish in the lake and large mammals in the forest, but limited infrastructure, no guarantee of Internet access, and high unemployment. The same in Russia as in Britain- if you want to support yourself you'll have to live in a city, in a small (at least at first) flat, wihout fire or bicycle. And if that city's Moscow then it has its own brand of stress - mainly due to the sheer number of people.

There are people who live outside the city in a nice house and a nice area and commute in- but typically they spend hours a day driving or commuting.

A lot of people who come here from abroad love Russia- and you can get a good feel for that by reading a lot of the threads on this site.

The single most popular route is to come here as an English teacher for a school who gives you a flat and visa etc and take it from there. Within a year or so you will likely have your own private students and income, or maybe a job offer in some other area of work, and a good idea of whether you like it enough to stay here longer.

But- as I mentioned earlier, if your dream is rural life, then it would be difficult to manage as a foreigner here, purely because of the lack of work. Like many places in the world young people leave the villages to go to the cities, leaving the villages with an ageing and often heavy-drinking population.

Having said that- many people live in a city like Moscow but spend their weekends in the country, at least in the Summer.

So- welcome, and browse arounfd the forum, and try and get a feel of the general mood amongst people who've come to live here. generally you'll find it's pretty positive.
very informative, thank you

Bels
01-10-2010, 00:58
You have hit the button, as it is alwys prettier on the other side. The point is that when you chose to emigrate,. Will you be well prepared in housing , finance etc. Yes Britain is perfect for some Russians, but not all. If you are seriously intersted, carefully plan first.For example finance for home, job or education. and sufficient English to communicate and survive in the country. You might make it and best of luck.


Russian people think the same about moving to the UK and the US

FlakeySnowballer
01-10-2010, 14:43
And those who did are thinking - are there any better places in the world than the UK and Russia;-). Grass is always greener on the other side.

Not in UK.

FlakeySnowballer
01-10-2010, 14:50
It's hard for me to believe that people would want to leave the UK for Russia.

For me not. If you would like to see real Brits just visit some English hotels in Cyprus for instance i bet that after 2 days spending in such hotel you will change your opinion.

Ian G
01-10-2010, 15:49
Not in UK.

No- Flakey, the grass really is greener in the UK. It's all the rain we have.

takedown
07-10-2010, 19:40
Oh my! This would be the worst decision you can ever made.
With UK\US citizenship you can live wherever you want.
Russia with current politics and economics situation have no future anyone here understand that. Your can't rob your people forever.
Who can leave they leave and even more of us want leaving too but can't. Just ask anyone between 20 to 30 year old very rarely you hear i would stay here if i can leave. Corruption on all levels, non-working law system, high cost of life and low quality, angry people around,political instability. Are you sure your want all this? If i would you i move here only for very big money and only temporary.

FlakeySnowballer
07-10-2010, 21:02
Takedown how old are you and where do you live?

You know if somebody wants to do something (for example move to another country) he does it if he does not want to do something he talks about that he can't do it because of different circumstances.

takedown
07-10-2010, 22:32
Takedown how old are you and where do you live?

You know if somebody wants to do something (for example move to another country) he does it if he does not want to do something he talks about that he can't do it because of different circumstances.

You don't get it, don't you?
There is always circumstances. Why are you not a multi-billion person if only you need to do is "to do something"?
That not the case with immigration. If that would be so easy everyone will be immigrate. So please don't answer with fancy quote if you don't know the case.
As i already say who can leave they already leave. There are a lot of russians in Europe and USA. Others who don't dream about it and trying what they can to get that chance happen. If people going to serve in US army just to get a chance stay in US don't this say anything? How shit they life was if they take that kind of risk? I know a guy from St. Petersburg who leave parents there and go to serve in US Marines but this just not for everyone.

FlakeySnowballer
07-10-2010, 23:10
First we are talking about moving to another country not about how to become Bill Gates.
Second if you wanted move you did it and don't tell me about emigration's troubles and so on because i know a family one day they decided move to Italy, they just did it, having a tourists visa only, they worked there about 6 month without working visa and so on (as you understand they worked not as specialists) So the problem is that you want to have a good job abroad, you don't want to be russian Jamshudt and so on. So at least you should receive degree here and try to continue your education abroad, but considering that you are a man i think you should have troubles with army. You should go there after university.

Bels
07-10-2010, 23:31
among other things do not count on becoming a translator in 3 years, u will need at least 10, besides there is plenty of fine translators out here allow u to take away their jobs
Correct !! The knowledge of annother language is not enough to be a translator. And this knowledge of this other language should be at of advanced level, preferably proficient. In other words being bi-lingual. But even more!! You should specialise in certain subjects such as law!! American or British English for example, as they are both different. Or perhaps try medical science?
Novels etc you don't stand a chance, as there are too many around who would do it for free or cheap, and they are cheap. And yes low quality translation. Same as translating movies or telivision. They pay low and get low quality tranlation in return. As they say, you get what you pay for.

My point is that language knowledge is not enough to be a translator. you need the proper qualifications. Russian to English, or English to Russian. First a high level ovel of your second language, secondly a degree in the study of linguistics. That is what a professional translator is.

takedown
07-10-2010, 23:32
First we are talking about moving to another country not about how to become Bill Gates.
Second if you wanted move you did it and don't tell me about emigration's troubles and so on because i know a family one day they decided move to Italy, they just did it, having a tourists visa only, they worked there about 6 month without working visa and so on (as you understand they worked not as specialists) So the problem is that you want to have a good job abroad, you don't want to be russian Jamshudt and so on. So at least you should receive degree here and try to continue your education abroad, but considering that you are a man i think you should have troubles with army. You should go there after university.

Yes we talk here about immigration not a illegal ones. Just buy tickets and go that for desperate ones. Education doesn't matter, the best way to get out of here is get a job offer but you must be a pro. As for army this just waste of time and can result in getting injured. I'm happily serve in US or Israeil army but not in russian. Anyway i don't have problems with that, corruption sometimes is a good thing.
Anyway my main point is not about immigration but about Russia have no future.

Bels
07-10-2010, 23:35
You have no idea, have you. We expats come here to Russia for different reasons. Not always for financial reasons. Have you ever heard of love for example?

How old are you?


Oh my! This would be the worst decision you can ever made.
With UK\US citizenship you can live wherever you want.
Russia with current politics and economics situation have no future anyone here understand that. Your can't rob your people forever.
Who can leave they leave and even more of us want leaving too but can't. Just ask anyone between 20 to 30 year old very rarely you hear i would stay here if i can leave. Corruption on all levels, non-working law system, high cost of life and low quality, angry people around,political instability. Are you sure your want all this? If i would you i move here only for very big money and only temporary.

FlakeySnowballer
07-10-2010, 23:37
Yes we talk here about immigration not a illegal ones. Just buy tickets and go that for desperate ones. Education doesn't matter, the best way to get out of here is get a job offer but you must be a pro. As for army this just waste of time and can result in getting injured. I'm happily serve in US or Israeil army but not in russian. Anyway i don't have problems with that, corruption sometimes is a good thing.
Anyway my main point is not about immigration but about Russia have no future.

You argued with me about that it was too difficult to move to another country and now you talk that the main idea of your topic was another. I don't understand you.

takedown
07-10-2010, 23:54
You have no idea, have you. We expats come here to Russia for different reasons. Not always for financial reasons. Have you ever heard of love for example?

How old are you?

This you who have no idea at all. I'm not talking about you or anyone else. I'm talking about topic starter who think he had bad life at UK and consider moving in Russia for future life. This is madness! I'm saying normal russians leaving or want to, they not happy and future is uncertain. That just stupid to live here if you can go anywhere in the world. I live here all my life so don't even try to say this is a great country to live and have a future with because it's not. Especially if you have a great opportunity to live anywhere!

takedown
08-10-2010, 00:06
You argued with me about that it was too difficult to move to another country and now you talk that the main idea of your topic was another. I don't understand you.

So what you wanna say immigration is easy? Immigration is difficult. I'm not saying running away and working as janitor in US. This is not a immigration. You don't provide any arguments instead offer working as janitor without documents.

Bels
08-10-2010, 00:11
So , which country would you like to live in? And what do you have to offer to this country. As that is the direction popular countries are going for. What do have to offer? investment? education? specialist knowledg? What?


This you who have no idea at all. I'm not talking about you or anyone else. I'm talking about topic starter who think he had bad life at UK and consider moving in Russia for future life. This is madness! I'm saying normal russians leaving or want to, they not happy and future is uncertain. That just stupid to live here if you can go anywhere in the world. I live here all my life so don't even try to say this is a great country to live and have a future with because it's not. Especially if you have a great opportunity to live anywhere!

takedown
08-10-2010, 00:59
So , which country would you like to live in? And what do you have to offer to this country. As that is the direction popular countries are going for. What do have to offer? investment? education? specialist knowledg? What?

Country doesn't really matter i just looking for cultured and civilized people, government working for people and economics opportunities. That mostly all developed country's. I'm young IT specialist and don't have much to offer other than just another working hands and if needed hands holding a gun. But what Europe benefit from not working arabs? Anyway right now i can't leave because i have to support my parents and if i leave they just die by hunger. Who think this is a great country check thisAverage (http://www.gazeta.ru/money/2010/03/03_n_3333095.shtml) pension in Russia by January 2010 was around 250$. My grandmother in Moscow get 350$(this is a moscow bonus and disability bonus and she is also work veteran during WWII). Average utility paycheck was around 150$ for 2 room flat. Then go to shop and drugstore and count the prices.

Bels
08-10-2010, 01:25
Got to admit, if you have a responsibility of taking care of an old babooska, disabled and financially unable to take care of hersel! I have the same problem. Same reson we as a family can't move on. If we did, babooska would blow up the flat with gas, as well as her pension wouldn't cover the costs of her food, and general bills. In fact her whole pension is not even enough to cover the ridiculous medication bills she has. So yes! There is something in what you say. Aren't medication costs a rip-off here! Yes these old people must be realy being ripped off here. I often wonder if they really do need such expensive medication. Somebody should look into this. IN UK it is still free for medication for pensioners and children. But here children and pensioners are ripped off by greedy pigs. And are the doctors in this drug vice?? As they apear to talk a load of crap. Boy!! Have I heard what my children should have and shouldn't have?? They sound like witches!!! Or American con merchants!!


Country doesn't really matter i just looking for cultured and civilized people, government working for people and economics opportunities. That mostly all developed country's. I'm young IT specialist and don't have much to offer other than just another working hands and if needed hands holding a gun. But what Europe benefit from not working arabs? Anyway right now i can't leave because i have to support my parents and if i leave they just die by hunger. Who think this is a great country check thisAverage (http://www.gazeta.ru/money/2010/03/03_n_3333095.shtml) pension in Russia by January 2010 was around 250$. My grandmother in Moscow get 350$(this is a moscow bonus and disability bonus and she is also work veteran during WWII). Average utility paycheck was around 150$ for 2 room flat. Then go to shop and drugstore and count the prices.

Yaakov1
08-10-2010, 09:25
In my opinion when people are moving to Russia they aren't really looking for a better life materialistically because theres VERY little chance that you will find that.

People who are moving to Russia are moving there for something else, love for the culture, maybe they have family there or maybe they just want to have a totally different lifestyle.

That said you wont find a better life in terms of money and such but some people may find that they are happier in Russia and maybe that's whats drawing them and making them stay.

Just my opinion.

alouette
08-10-2010, 14:32
I find Marvo's idea utopian. He's fed up with life there, in UK. But why to chose Russia? For 'better life' (his words)?
'I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something.'

Any idea about on what visa to come? I'm not suggesting anybody to break the law and stay here to work being on a tourist or visitor's visa

Accommodation? A small wooden shack with stove heating? Has anybody on the forum lived in such conditions in a Russian village? Please, enlight me, a humble city dweller.

Translating or teaching job in the country? To become a translator or a teacher takes(as rightly mentioned above) much more than 2 or 3 years (unless a person has a real talent for languages.)

Somebody might come (have come) for the reason of love (a person or a country or both) but I failed to find this particular reason in Marvo's posts.

Don't want to discourage anyone but moving here is a very serious DECISION and should be thought over and over and based on more solid ground than just being pissed of the situation in one's own country.

MickeyTong
08-10-2010, 14:53
..... moving here is a very serious DECISION and should be thought over and over and based on more solid ground than just being pissed of the situation in one's own country.

:10806: Absolutely 100% good advice :10189:

takedown
08-10-2010, 19:37
I find Marvo's idea utopian. He's fed up with life there, in UK. But why to chose Russia? For 'better life' (his words)?
'I am quite happy with a bicycle and small wooden shack with some wood on the fire and doing some translating or teaching or something.'

Any idea about on what visa to come? I'm not suggesting anybody to break the law and stay here to work being on a tourist or visitor's visa

Accommodation? A small wooden shack with stove heating? Has anybody on the forum lived in such conditions in a Russian village? Please, enlight me, a humble city dweller.

Translating or teaching job in the country? To become a translator or a teacher takes(as rightly mentioned above) much more than 2 or 3 years (unless a person has a real talent for languages.)

Somebody might come (have come) for the reason of love (a person or a country or both) but I failed to find this particular reason in Marvo's posts.

Don't want to discourage anyone but moving here is a very serious DECISION and should be thought over and over and based on more solid ground than just being pissed of the situation in one's own country.

Glad this just not only me who understand that!