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haghj00
13-10-2009, 19:02
Im a swedish guy, who´s looking at some Russian universities.

Moscow and SPB seems to be the best cities in russia (from what I have read on the internet). However, both cities are expensive, and when im talking about expensive i dont mean food or alcohol and so on.

Im planning to buy a apartment in the city I move too, and real estate in moscow and SPB seem to be so high. I dont know if I can trust the website prices, but 300 thousand dollar for a 2 room apartment seems a bit overpriced.

So, what "other" big cities are there in Russia that you guys would recommend me? Im already studying russian here in Sweden so I will know the basics when I go there.

Thanks,

Johan

FatAndy
13-10-2009, 19:31
Swedish?! Nice, you'll not ask Very Important Questions about Terrible Long Russian Winter ;)

Recommendations depend on area you plan to learn. Generally after Moscow and SPb I recommend to look at "millionniki" - cities with 1M+ habitants, and among these - federal district centers. They're: Nizhny Novgorod (aka Nizhny as nickname), Rostov-na-Donu (Rostov-papa), Ekaterinburg (Ekat or Yoburg), Novosibirsk (Novosib, Ensk), Habarovsk.

Samara, Volgograd, Saratov, Krasnodar, Kazan', Kirov, Perm', Chelyabinsk, Tyumen', Krasnoyarsk, Omsk, Tomsk, Irkutsk, Vladivostok, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky also are interesting.

trebor
13-10-2009, 20:19
You're going to need help if you don't speak Russian well and i'm presuming you don't. You will need help to understand the process and it can be complicated also be carefull you don't get ripped off with the price.
I actually think it could be a very good time to buy but you need to do your research.
It would be a good idea to focus on finding cities that have good universities/ones that will except you first, then narrow it down to places you would rather live.
I wouldn't go too far east, travel back to Sweden will be long and expensive.
I have a feeling you will be shocked by real estate prices in Russia for anything remotely habitable even in smaller cities.

Moskauerin
13-10-2009, 20:38
Hi Johan and Welcome to the Forum! As stated above, it would really be good to know Russian if you would like to stay here to live and study.

You are absolutely right that USD 300K (some RUB 9 mio) is overpriced for a 2 room apartment. However your idea of buying and not renting strikes me as rather strange. How can you be sure that you will want to stay here? Besides I do not know how property deals are carried out for non-residents here (all this buying - documents preparation - registration, etc.). Many people here opt for renting accomodation.

Even if it is some romance (with a Russian girl or with the country itself), don't jump to this decision too quickly.

To answer your question: you can consider other cities with at least 1 mln population and more. The 3d largest after Moscow and St.-Petersburg is Ekaterinburg. But beware about the climate - it's next to the Urals and further is already Siberia. Also large cities are Krasnodar in the South, Novosibirsk, Omsk, Perm.

However the best universities are in the two capitals. Especially if you are going to study medicine, as stated in your first post, this is important to have a good school from the start.

You may also consider living in the suburbs or the Moscow region. Housing is cheaper there and it is possible to commute to the city center.

Please ask further questions if you have any. Many people will be happy to help you here.

Bels
13-10-2009, 20:54
My guess is that you have been looking in the wrong places such as what English speaking estate agent were selling more than a year ago. Are you able to find good Russian sites? Try advertising and in reality it should be half this pricee by now. After all you are not seeking a mansion.

SV1973a
13-10-2009, 22:06
Hi Johan,
What are you going to study in Russia?
I would opt for a prestigous university in either Moscow or Sint-Petersburg, not for one in the smaller cities.
I do not know if you can buy property being a non-resident. I don`t think that would be a wise investment, because owning property does not give you any more rights to apply for residency. You might be faced with a situation that your property is here, but that you have no access to it.
Anyway, once you made up your mind about what and where to study, I can give you advice on the steps you need to take to be allowed to study (i.e. have your diploma `nostrificated` - which is another tough and tideous process you will have to go through like so many other bureaucratic things in Russia - and the Russian language test that you need to pass).

haghj00
14-10-2009, 01:02
Hi Johan,
What are you going to study in Russia?
I would opt for a prestigous university in either Moscow or Sint-Petersburg, not for one in the smaller cities.
I do not know if you can buy property being a non-resident. I don`t think that would be a wise investment, because owning property does not give you any more rights to apply for residency. You might be faced with a situation that your property is here, but that you have no access to it.
Anyway, once you made up your mind about what and where to study, I can give you advice on the steps you need to take to be allowed to study (i.e. have your diploma `nostrificated` - which is another tough and tideous process you will have to go through like so many other bureaucratic things in Russia - and the Russian language test that you need to pass).



Ok, answer to all. Yes, I dont speak russian. When I go to russia, i will just know the alphabet and being able to have a easy conversation (not discussing the iraqwar).

Im going to russia to study medicine, english program. Thats why im going to buy a apartment there. Staying a long time in russia (6 years..). Better to buy a apartment and change it into the way I want it and feel like "home".
I have been all over the world, all over europe, middle east, asia and amerika. I know that its good to rent, however, im staying for such a long time....

And dont worry about the weather, I come from NORTH of sweden. I know what - 30 degrees are like (with wind..) :-)

Thanks,

Johan

haghj00
14-10-2009, 01:03
You're going to need help if you don't speak Russian well and i'm presuming you don't. You will need help to understand the process and it can be complicated also be carefull you don't get ripped off with the price.
I actually think it could be a very good time to buy but you need to do your research.
It would be a good idea to focus on finding cities that have good universities/ones that will except you first, then narrow it down to places you would rather live.
I wouldn't go too far east, travel back to Sweden will be long and expensive.
I have a feeling you will be shocked by real estate prices in Russia for anything remotely habitable even in smaller cities.

Im sure all the medical universities who has a english program accepts me.
Far away from sweden is better, it means family wont visit so often ;)

haghj00
14-10-2009, 01:14
Swedish?! Nice, you'll not ask Very Important Questions about Terrible Long Russian Winter ;)

Recommendations depend on area you plan to learn. Generally after Moscow and SPb I recommend to look at "millionniki" - cities with 1M+ habitants, and among these - federal district centers. They're: Nizhny Novgorod (aka Nizhny as nickname), Rostov-na-Donu (Rostov-papa), Ekaterinburg (Ekat or Yoburg), Novosibirsk (Novosib, Ensk), Habarovsk.

Samara, Volgograd, Saratov, Krasnodar, Kazan', Kirov, Perm', Chelyabinsk, Tyumen', Krasnoyarsk, Omsk, Tomsk, Irkutsk, Vladivostok, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky also are interesting.

Thanks, looking into your recommendation now :)

tvadim133
14-10-2009, 01:37
I understand your point regarding feeling like home.

May be for 6 years, it is worth buying a flat indeed.

I will forward the sites of agencies, which are used by russian locally (so I did use it when I looked for a flat to be bought).

I would recommend to look an appartment not in the centre where they are expremely expensive but in walking distance from Metro:

The only thing is that to live exactly next to Metro is not convinient sometimes (too many people, cars, kiosks, beer drinkers e.t.c.), but 5-10 minutes of walk is better.

If you download the map of Metro, you can easy understand how many minutes it will take you to go the centre: one stop (between stations) is equal to 3 minutes (approximately).

haghj00
14-10-2009, 01:55
And I also think like this..... 6 years is a long time. It means, my friends will be in russia. Girlfriend, job and so on. Most likely I will stay afterwards rather than moving back to Sweden...

SV1973a
14-10-2009, 07:29
Hi Johan, some more questions for you that may help us to give you better advice :
How old are you now?
Will this be your first university degree?
Have you been to Russia before, and if so, for how long?

There seem to be some things that you do not really take into account :
1. it is typical that law degrees and medical degrees are difficult to recognise in other countries. As a result your Russian medical degree will not give you the right to practice medicine should you ever return to Sweden.
2. do you really intend to make a living as a MD in Russia, more specifically in some remote city. It is not exactly one of the best payed professions, unless you can work for some European or American private hospitals (but these are looking for doctors with a foreign education, not a Russian one).
3. I seriously doubt that there are English language medical programs in Russian universities
4. in the recent past, are there any scientific breakthroughs from Russia in the field of medicine that you know of? One complaint from Russian doctors is that they are well trained, but lack modern equipment that is available in the west. Why would you place yourself in such a position?
5. You will need to foresee at least one full year to study the Russian language before you will be allowed to study, that is if you do not yet have the TRKI1, regardless of what field you want to study.

Bottom line, if I were you I would seriously reconsider. Actually studying in Russia is OK, but certainly not medicine.
Once you have made up your mind and reconsidered my remarks, you can think about buying or renting property.

Looking forward to your reply.

haghj00
14-10-2009, 19:16
Hi Johan, some more questions for you that may help us to give you better advice :
How old are you now?
Will this be your first university degree?
Have you been to Russia before, and if so, for how long?

There seem to be some things that you do not really take into account :
1. it is typical that law degrees and medical degrees are difficult to recognise in other countries. As a result your Russian medical degree will not give you the right to practice medicine should you ever return to Sweden.
2. do you really intend to make a living as a MD in Russia, more specifically in some remote city. It is not exactly one of the best payed professions, unless you can work for some European or American private hospitals (but these are looking for doctors with a foreign education, not a Russian one).
3. I seriously doubt that there are English language medical programs in Russian universities
4. in the recent past, are there any scientific breakthroughs from Russia in the field of medicine that you know of? One complaint from Russian doctors is that they are well trained, but lack modern equipment that is available in the west. Why would you place yourself in such a position?
5. You will need to foresee at least one full year to study the Russian language before you will be allowed to study, that is if you do not yet have the TRKI1, regardless of what field you want to study.

Bottom line, if I were you I would seriously reconsider. Actually studying in Russia is OK, but certainly not medicine.
Once you have made up your mind and reconsidered my remarks, you can think about buying or renting property.

Looking forward to your reply.


I will answer your questions:

1. My father has multiply clinics in sweden, no need to worry about not being able to work in sweden. We have talked and looked this up already.

2. I already make a better living than a doctor (in sweden). I have a few websites that generate good income. No need to think about money...

3. There are over 6 universities in Russia which offers the medical program in english (ofcourse, have to pay tuition fee).

Here is a few that offers in english:
Volgograd state Medical University
I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy
Russian state medical university
Russian peoples friendship university
Krusk state medical university
Astrakhan state medical university
Bashkir state medica luniversity

and so on.... :-)

4. see #1

5. True, I need to study 1 year Pre-Med in russia, no problem.



And no, I dont have a degree from before. However I have a lot of universitypoints in various subjects. :-)

I have thought and thought a lot about it. Russia is cheap (tuition fee), its in english, its a bright future, a language which is important worldwide, growing economy and so on. It all makes logic to me to pick Russia over Ukraine or some other countries.

:wavey:

GaNozri
14-10-2009, 19:42
I have thought and thought a lot about it. Russia is cheap (tuition fee), its in english, its a bright future, a language which is important worldwide, growing economy and so on. It all makes logic to me to pick Russia over Ukraine or some other countries.

:wavey:

Now, here's a Swede I like!!!!!

Most, some on this forum would tell you to go to one of the Baltics (esp. Estonia) to study, because they are EU and are soooo much more European and civilized, with a strong economic potential.

Welcome to the forum, and to Russia.

Have you considered Pirogov Medical in Moscow? Their Eng. med program is after 3rd year I believe, but if you take 1st year pre-med in Russian you shouldn't have a problem with 3 years in Russian.

Also, I am pretty sure that you'll be fine with Russian medical degree in most of Europe (Germany for sure, probably Sweden as well). US and Canada are hard, but hard to European medical grads as well as Russian. Not because their medicine, or med schools are more advanced, but because it is a club. UK will probably be a problem, just coz they're snobs. They'll hire doctors from India or Pakistan, before Russian or Polish, just because they consider the Indians to be "tame barbarians".

haghj00
14-10-2009, 22:20
Now, here's a Swede I like!!!!!

Most, some on this forum would tell you to go to one of the Baltics (esp. Estonia) to study, because they are EU and are soooo much more European and civilized, with a strong economic potential.

Welcome to the forum, and to Russia.

Have you considered Pirogov Medical in Moscow? Their Eng. med program is after 3rd year I believe, but if you take 1st year pre-med in Russian you shouldn't have a problem with 3 years in Russian.

Also, I am pretty sure that you'll be fine with Russian medical degree in most of Europe (Germany for sure, probably Sweden as well). US and Canada are hard, but hard to European medical grads as well as Russian. Not because their medicine, or med schools are more advanced, but because it is a club. UK will probably be a problem, just coz they're snobs. They'll hire doctors from India or Pakistan, before Russian or Polish, just because they consider the Indians to be "tame barbarians".

Lets face it. Baltic countries are in EU, yes. But where is the future? Moscow alone has X times more trade and economy than all the baltic countries together. I cant see the logic. And we are just comparing baltic countries vs moscow, not russia.

Russia is a growing economy, a growing country, where russia is today and russia in 20 years.... Well i cant imagen!

I will check the university you informed me about, thanks.

I dont want to move to canada or united states, I have the money to go and study there. But no thanks.

Thanks

Kamrat Johan

:trooper:

SV1973a
14-10-2009, 22:30
1. My father has multiply clinics in sweden, no need to worry about not being able to work in sweden. We have talked and looked this up already.

I was talking about, whether a Russian medical degree gives you the right to practice medicine in Sweden. More like a legal issue, then the issue whether you could get a job.
For instance, if my father would own clinics I would not be allowed to work there as a doctor, because I don`t have the proper qualification. If Sweden does not recognise the Russian degree, you also will not have the proper qualification...



3. There are over 6 universities in Russia which offers the medical program in english (ofcourse, have to pay tuition fee).

Here is a few that offers in english:
Volgograd state Medical University
I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy
Russian state medical university
Russian peoples friendship university
Krusk state medical university
Astrakhan state medical university
Bashkir state medica luniversity

and so on.... :-)

What makes you think that these universities use English as language of instruction? Surely not just because they have an English language version of their websites?
I can never believe that there are enough Russian professors to be found, that are so fluent in English that they can give lectures in it, to staff just one medical university.
I have given guest lectures at the technical universities of Sint-Petersburg and Odessa. As an experiment I did a small part of it in English. This is too difficult for the majority of students. Whom would they be organising a complete education in English for?
Better check this out again!


And no, I dont have a degree from before. However I have a lot of universitypoints in various subjects. :-)

I don`t think you can get any credits for that.


I have thought and thought a lot about it. Russia is cheap (tuition fee), its in english, its a bright future, a language which is important worldwide, growing economy and so on. It all makes logic to me to pick Russia over Ukraine or some other countries.

I beg to differ on different points.
Low tuition fees, OK
in english, probably not
Russian language does not have `worldwide` importance, but it certainly is in this part of the world (and that part happens to be very very big and stretches from Belarus to the Pacific Ocean)
Growing economy, the future will tell

You are right to pick Russia over Ukraine (although also in Ukraine lectures are mostly given in Russian)

Bels
14-10-2009, 22:41
On reading all posts I say NO! NO! NO!. Make your options USA, Canada, Australia, OR EU. That's it otherwise you are making a big mistake. You need to be recognised internationally.

haghj00
14-10-2009, 22:45
I was talking about, whether a Russian medical degree gives you the right to practice medicine in Sweden. More like a legal issue, then the issue whether you could get a job.
For instance, if my father would own clinics I would not be allowed to work there as a doctor, because I don`t have the proper qualification. If Sweden does not recognise the Russian degree, you also will not have the proper qualification...




What makes you think that these universities use English as language of instruction? Surely not just because they have an English language version of their websites?
I can never believe that there are enough Russian professors to be found, that are so fluent in English that they can give lectures in it, to staff just one medical university.
I have given guest lectures at the technical universities of Sint-Petersburg and Odessa. As an experiment I did a small part of it in English. This is too difficult for the majority of students. Whom would they be organising a complete education in English for?
Better check this out again!



I don`t think you can get any credits for that.



I beg to differ on different points.
Low tuition fees, OK
in english, probably not
Russian language does not have `worldwide` importance, but it certainly is in this part of the world (and that part happens to be very very big and stretches from Belarus to the Pacific Ocean)
Growing economy, the future will tell

You are right to pick Russia over Ukraine (although also in Ukraine lectures are mostly given in Russian)


I told you that my father has clinics in sweden, why? Because, if i get a M.D. degree and decide to move back to sweden, i can work about a year "under" my father and that time im recognized as a doctor.

About the universities, all of them have 2 programs. Russian and international (english) programs. Im going for the english one.
Russia is not alone in this, poland, ukraine, baltic countries, hungary, romania, and so on offers the same. China alone has 54 universities where they have medical program for international students in english. I have emailed them, i have called them, i have spoken to agents for the universities. Trust me, i know what im doing here! :)

About my credits, no, i cant, no need? Why would I want to get credits for subjects i have studied here? Im going for M.D. program which is 6 years in russia.

GaNozri
14-10-2009, 22:45
On reading all posts I say NO! NO! NO!. Make your options USA, Canada, Australia, OR EU. That's it otherwise you are making a big mistake. You need to be recognised internationally.

How do you know, that Russian medical diplomas are not recognised in Sweden?

Bels
14-10-2009, 22:58
How do you know, that Russian medical diplomas are not recognised in Sweden?

There is an ageny that all RussiaN graduates have to go through to check credibility of a degree, which must be translated. For Russian degrees there is an extra fee for this translation. Best of Luck. I don't know for sure if Sweden will accept this degree. But what I do know is that Sweden sets very high standards. And all I can say is best of luck.

tvadim133
14-10-2009, 23:11
There is an ageny that all RussiaN graduates have to go through to check credibility of a degree, which must be translated. For Russian degrees there is an extra fee for this translation. Best of Luck. I don't know for sure if Sweden will accept this degree. But what I do know is that Sweden sets very high standards. And all I can say is best of luck.

That's why in Sweden there are a lot of russian doctors and other russian specialists.

To my mind, we have started a very good topic regarding higher education in Russia.

But the problem is that many of us are not much of it now:

For instance I graduated from the university in 1995 but I can say, that time it was more then brilliant (the system of education).

But I would not be ready with the answer, what is going on now.

May be you can, if you work in universities or have just graduated (not just school, english school).

Are there any who can provide with the objective information "from the first hands"?

GaNozri
14-10-2009, 23:21
I have a friend who works in Dusseldorf as a psychiatryst. She graduated in Moscow, and all she had to do is pass a German language test, and go through an internship.

SV1973a
14-10-2009, 23:29
About the universities, all of them have 2 programs. Russian and international (english) programs. Im going for the english one.
Russia is not alone in this, poland, ukraine, baltic countries, hungary, romania, and so on offers the same. China alone has 54 universities where they have medical program for international students in english. I have emailed them, i have called them, i have spoken to agents for the universities. Trust me, i know what im doing here! :)


I checked some of their websites, but could find nothing that confirms your statement... Why do they not advertise this on their sites?

tvadim133
14-10-2009, 23:30
I have a friend who works in Dusseldorf as a psychiatryst. She graduated in Moscow, and all she had to do is pass a German language test, and go through an internship.

So do I: in USA (doctor), in Sweden (engineer), in Germany (2 engineers) Stutgardt), in France (a teacher, a vet, a plastic surgeon) and in Luxemburg (engineer)

GaNozri
14-10-2009, 23:32
I checked some of their websites, but could find nothing that confirms your statement... Why do they not advertise this on their sites?

Because they don't have to. Most of the foreign students are "recruited" through ministry of education channels, in their home countries. Mind you, most of them are Asian, or African, but they still study in English.

SV1973a
14-10-2009, 23:43
So do I: in USA (doctor), in Sweden (engineer), in Germany (2 engineers) Stutgardt), in France (a teacher, a vet, a plastic surgeon) and in Luxemburg (engineer)

Some professions can encounter difficulties to get recognition in other countries. I am mainly thinking about medicine and law degrees. Very often these people need to pass additional tests before they can get recognition.

Engineers, scientists, linguists,... hardly ever encounter difficulties with recognition.

GaNozri
14-10-2009, 23:46
Russia and Germany subscribe to the same "school of medicine". Hence, Russian diplomas are recognized there, and everywhere else this school has been adopted.

Bels
14-10-2009, 23:47
Why not? One way is to ask potential employers in Sweden of what they think of Russian degrees in your subject. In fact that is good advice for all who are seeking qualifications. How will your qualification be recognised. By how the empoyer look upon it. Make your inviestigations before you make a decision, Ask your potential Swedish employers what they think. No matter what direction you decide to take in the end,

This applies to TEFL qualifications in UK, Russia, USA, Canada etc. What are the employers of these countries looking for? I assume you want your qualification to be recognised internationally? And not just Russia?

SV1973a
15-10-2009, 00:03
Because they don't have to. Most of the foreign students are "recruited" through ministry of education channels, in their home countries. Mind you, most of them are Asian, or African, but they still study in English.

So your claim is that these foreign students get a full medical education on a Russian university, and English is the language of instruction?
I can not believe that until I see some proof.

That Asian and African students are recruited to study in Russia, is correct - I see them everyday, as I live next to the State Medical University and not far from the People Friendship university.
What would be the purpose for Russia to invest in these people, and give them an education in English instead of in Russian.

I also stick with my remark, how on earth are you going to find enough Russian professors that master English well enough, so that they are able to give lectures in that language.

GaNozri
15-10-2009, 00:09
I've seen these students write applications at the deans office in English. At the same Med. University you live by. Not ALL instruction is in English, but some is, and they have a choice of writing tests in English or Russian. In my book, that's pretty much English language education. Talk to some of the graduates, and their Russian skills, are totally inefficient to practice medicine in Russian. That's for sure.

SV1973a
15-10-2009, 00:12
That's why in Sweden there are a lot of russian doctors and other russian specialists.

Are there really? A lot of Russian doctors, I mean?

GaNozri
15-10-2009, 00:14
I also stick with my remark, how on earth are you going to find enough Russian professors that master English well enough, so that they are able to give lectures in that language.

They go through English language training. A professor's English conversational skills could leave a lot to be desired, but it doesn't mean that he can't lecture in BioChemistry, or Pathalogical Anathomy. Especially since the students have enough Russian skills to comprehend the connective language, and the professor has English language teaching manuals.

Bels
15-10-2009, 00:38
WOW! Sorry but id have very high regards for the Swedes and other countries in the medical profession. I know of many Russians who are wary of those such professionals in Russia. In fact some worry iwhether they bought it or not.

haghj00
15-10-2009, 19:02
Ok. Listen now. If you dont believe me, fine, call the university yourself or email them.

CONTEMPORARY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES | EDUCATION IN RUSSIA | HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INTITUTIONS | MSUMD (http://www.cep.ru/msu1.shtml#med)

Medical Doctor

6 years full time

Foreign students have a choice to join Russian-speaking student group (after finishing 1 year preparatory course at the MSU) or English-speaking group (during first 3 years training goes in English, from 4th to 6th year - in Russian).

Why it changes after 3 years, is because you have to be able to speak russian with the patients when you do clinical rotation.

haghj00
15-10-2009, 19:09
The Hindu : International / India & World : Russian medical varsities beckon aspiring doctors from India (http://www.thehindu.com/2006/10/07/stories/2006100701431400.htm)


India figures prominently in Russia's radar — the chief attraction for students is the promise of high-quality medical education.

Agencies involved in bringing foreign students to Russia's nine medical schools say these institutions today offer Indian students up to 730 paid seats in the six-year under-graduate and two - five-year post-graduate medical programmes.



Indian students can do their MBBS or MD course in English in Russia's medical schools. However, foreign students must necessarily learn Russian for patient interaction, according to Vladimir M. Filippov, Rector of the People's Friendship University of Russia, at Moscow.


Need more?

tvadim133
15-10-2009, 19:10
Hi!

Do not worry too much of the discussion.

What is mean is that:

People here are thinking and it is good when we can discuss, argue, talk e.t.c.!

We do not do it because we would like you to change YOUR opinion or decision, but give you the opportunity to get as much people's opinion as possible.

It is good that you can see different points at least (why not?).

I think if you have a goal, nothing can prevent you from achieving it!

:boxing:

haghj00
15-10-2009, 19:20
Hi!

Do not worry too much of the discussion.

What is mean is that:

People here are thinking and it is good when we can discuss, argue, talk e.t.c.!

We do not do it because we would like you to change YOUR opinion or decision, but give you the opportunity to get as much people's opinion as possible.

It is good that you can see different points at least (why not?).

I think if you have a goal, nothing can prevent you from achieving it!

:boxing:


Sure, I dont mind a discussion about the education, if the education is recognized abroad and so on. What I do have a problem with, is discussion about things people have no clue about. Is there a english program or not and so on. If you have no clue, thats fine, all people are not interested in medicine in russia, however, over and over i said there are a english program. Please, dont repeat things! Some people in this thread sounds just like my old girlfriend.

:10241:

Im sticking to what ive said here. Russia is a growing country in all aspects. Its a country with a bright future. Its perfect to go to russia for work, study do bussines.

About the recognition, it depends on the country. For me, as a swede, this isnt a problem. This is the first thing i looked up long before I even thought about going to russia. Step by step...

I hope, that I can go to russia soon and meet some of you, maybe share a bottle of smirnoff :10806:

tvadim133
15-10-2009, 22:30
at least wiskey and martini (mixed?)!

Bels
15-10-2009, 22:43
What they call growing and developing countries today is what they called underdeveloped or third world countries yesterday. It is simply a change of polite words now internationally recognised. The issue is though. Will your qualifications be recognised in Sweden if and when you return? No I don't think so. Get an EU degree, preferably from the top three countries in the EU. Alternatively from Yourown country. Anothether choice would be Holland or Switzerland as those countries are also seen as excellent.

Bels
15-10-2009, 22:45
at least wiskey and martini (mixed?)!

Please! Scotch Whiskey. But I don't know abot the Martini as that's a bit feminine.

tvadim133
15-10-2009, 23:04
and what about Bond and Martini?

I like dry Martini sometimes (depends upon the society) to share with my GF.

And though it might be too feminine
to your mind, I will never refuse Brut champaign.

+ I like white Wine

+ I like beer and vodka but less then whiskey and martini.

I prefer Irish whiskey, frankly speaking!

I am sorry, if it hurts you.

But if there is no choice, I can stand.

I like all kinds of alco if they are tasty, to be frank.

:11581:

Bels
15-10-2009, 23:28
It's ok it doesn't hurt me. To be perfectly honest I hate spirits, and prefer not much more than a few bottles of Bavaria in the evenings while I am in Russia.

tvadim133
15-10-2009, 23:34
Super!

As for me I like drinking for pleasure but not for being drunk....

haghj00
16-10-2009, 01:09
What they call growing and developing countries today is what they called underdeveloped or third world countries yesterday. It is simply a change of polite words now internationally recognised. The issue is though. Will your qualifications be recognised in Sweden if and when you return? No I don't think so. Get an EU degree, preferably from the top three countries in the EU. Alternatively from Yourown country. Anothether choice would be Holland or Switzerland as those countries are also seen as excellent.

Holland and Switzerland dont have medicine in english.

If i get a degree from russia, I can get it recognized in sweden. I have said it so multiply times in this thread, yet you seem to have a hard time understanding this.

My father has over 40 doctors working in 7 different clinics for him. Some come from Iran, Egypt, China and so on. Recognized. All of them educated in their own country.

Now, please, drop this, i dont like repeat mentality. If you have no clue, just leave it. Dont continue to spam the same sentence over and over.

Thanks

Johan

:10293:

SV1973a
16-10-2009, 18:36
It is your life man. You should follow the path that brings you happiness...


Sure, I dont mind a discussion about the education, if the education is recognized abroad and so on. What I do have a problem with, is discussion about things people have no clue about. Is there a english program or not and so on. If you have no clue, thats fine, all people are not interested in medicine in russia, however, over and over i said there are a english program. Please, dont repeat things!

Well, I suggest you give it a try, and share your experiences with this forum. I think it would be of interest to other people that intend to take up university studies in Russia.


Some people in this thread sounds just like my old girlfriend.

What does a young guy like you need an `old` girlfriend for? :goldy:


Russia is a growing country in all aspects.

You probably have a `romantic` view of Russia.
I have more than 10 years of experience in this country. I am not convinced that this statement is true. Indeed, the people I know in Moscow and Sint-Petersburg seem to have a better life than 10 years ago. I don`t know about other people than those in my own social circle, nor about other places in Russia. I doubt that life for a pensioner in 2009 is any better than in 2004, the same goes for a schoolteacher in some remote little town.


Its a country with a bright future.

This country has always had a bright future.
It also always had a glorious past.
It is just the present...
In my experience this is a typical characteristic of Russians; they like to work on the realisation of big projects, think of `shaping the communist society` (but they have difficulties to realise them).


Its perfect to go to russia for work, study do bussines.

I agree, but I definitely would not chose Russia to study medicine...


I hope, that I can go to russia soon and meet some of you, maybe share a bottle of smirnoff.

Now that`s a good idea.

Ihealpeople
16-10-2009, 20:26
Hi all,
First time posting here, so a quick hello to everyone first.

I am an American going to study medicine in Russia. I have BS/BM and now it is time for me to branch out and to do what I truly would love to do. I will be studying at the Pavlov medical academy in SPB in the English medium.
I do speak Russian. My wife is Russian, I lived in SPB for 3 years, 3 years ago.
As to the concern about Johan's choice of medical studies in Russia, please set aside your concerns as the top five medical schools in Russia (even in the English medium) are recognized by the WHO (world heath organization), the governing body that accredits and recognizes all foreign MDs.
Although some of you might ask why anyone would choose to study in Russia if funds are not an issue, please consider, funds are always an issue. I have a 3.87GPA, and my MCAT was 29 (10/9/10). My scores are competitive with American medical schools, but the thought of after four years owing more than half a million dollars is somewhat mind boggling. Instead, one can attend a Russian university and spend only 6k per year on tuition and receive the same MD, but it will take longer to do so.

Johan, if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask, I'll be more than happy to assist you in any way possible.

If anyone would like the links to any of the information I have provided I will be more than happy to post them, after all, inquiring minds are always inquiring.

Best wishes, and nice to meet you all,
devin

haghj00
16-10-2009, 21:50
Hi all,
First time posting here, so a quick hello to everyone first.

I am an American going to study medicine in Russia. I have BS/BM and now it is time for me to branch out and to do what I truly would love to do. I will be studying at the Pavlov medical academy in SPB in the English medium.
I do speak Russian. My wife is Russian, I lived in SPB for 3 years, 3 years ago.
As to the concern about Johan's choice of medical studies in Russia, please set aside your concerns as the top five medical schools in Russia (even in the English medium) are recognized by the WHO (world heath organization), the governing body that accredits and recognizes all foreign MDs.
Although some of you might ask why anyone would choose to study in Russia if funds are not an issue, please consider, funds are always an issue. I have a 3.87GPA, and my MCAT was 29 (10/9/10). My scores are competitive with American medical schools, but the thought of after four years owing more than half a million dollars is somewhat mind boggling. Instead, one can attend a Russian university and spend only 6k per year on tuition and receive the same MD, but it will take longer to do so.

Johan, if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask, I'll be more than happy to assist you in any way possible.

If anyone would like the links to any of the information I have provided I will be more than happy to post them, after all, inquiring minds are always inquiring.

Best wishes, and nice to meet you all,
devin

When do you intend to start? Next year?
I sent you a PM.

Ihealpeople
17-10-2009, 01:16
When do you intend to start? Next year?
I sent you a PM.

Johan,

I'll be starting in 2010. My wife on the other hand will start this January (late) in the preparatory course (as is required for all non native English speakers), but she has special permission to do so on account that she has a linguistics degree from SPB state university and thus, they believe that she can speak some English already. lols

haghj00
17-10-2009, 14:40
Johan,

I'll be starting in 2010. My wife on the other hand will start this January (late) in the preparatory course (as is required for all non native English speakers), but she has special permission to do so on account that she has a linguistics degree from SPB state university and thus, they believe that she can speak some English already. lols

Haha, you are american right? Sorry a bit hangover today.
How come you went to PSB a few years ago? Because of your wife or what?

Interesting! Pre-med is one year isnt it? Or is it 6 months?

Thanks

Sasha girl
18-10-2009, 23:08
UK will probably be a problem, just coz they're snobs. They'll hire doctors from India or Pakistan, before Russian or Polish, just because they consider the Indians to be "tame barbarians".

Hi!

From the beggining I do not know the subject in depths. But there was an agreement between India in Russia in the past for students, and many many Indians were studying particularly medicine in Russia, and many of them work in Uk. Though of course Indians might have a little easier way to do that in UK.

I also have met TWO former USSR dorctors working in English hospitals.

CaliforniaChic
18-10-2009, 23:20
I think studying medicine abroad is a good idea. So many Americans study medicine in Central America, Central Europe and in the Carribbean, just because the tuition is a lot cheaper and the programs are just as rigorous and as qualified as several medical programs in the U.S. To get accredited back in the U.S., most of these doctors, dentists and vets simply have to apply for a 1-2 year long program offered through certain universities, do an internship and take some state board exams and other exams. No, problem if you have completed a full medical program abroad. If you are interested in a Russian medical program then you should go ahead and apply for one. If you find that you don't enjoy the program or that for some reason it just is not what you expected it to be, then at least you tried and you will certainly have a unique experience in comparison to so many others. A lot of people also thought I was crazy to study Russian and to come and live here, but my Russian skills have come in handy in several countries and have opened a lot of business opportunities for me. Good luck to you!

tvadim133
18-10-2009, 23:25
Hi!

And you have studied just the language or something more specific in Russia?

What field do you work in?

Enjoyrussian
11-02-2010, 12:18
To study in Russia first of course you need Russian! to improve your Russian or even to start learning it from scratch it is a great idea to visit some language school. For instance, Russian Language school "Enjoy Russian" situated in Karelia, Russia. The region borders the EU so it won't be a big problem to reach us. The school is very popular among foreign students as the program is very flexible and efficient. The sudying in our school implies cultural programs as well and the full language immersion. So even you don't speak Russian at all, soon you'll be able to speak yourself and understand others. More info at Russian Language School Enjoy Russian (http://enjoyrussian.com/)
we'll be glad to welcome you in summer and offer various summer language courses :10189:

cchastje
11-02-2010, 13:16
I can offer some anecdotal experience on the topic.

I have a good friend, a surgeon at a podmuscovy hospital about 4-5 years out of medical training. I've spent a good chunk of time at the hospital and come to know lots of doctors there. They are great people and most I would trust completely with my care, but it is quite clear that most have not had access to many modern techniques and equipment, and none of them can speak more than very basic English. The hours and workload are brutal (frequent back-to-back 24-hour shifts and constantly oncall, my friend's mobile never stops ringing), although it is the same for my physician acquaintences in the US, but unlike in the US, the pay is absolutely abyssmal. For comparison, bus drivers in the US make more. My friend is constantly short on money and still has not been able to take his dream holiday abroad.

This friend expressed an strong interst to immigrate to the USA, so we looked at the process. Not so difficult due to the physician shortage in the US. He would need to pass English tests and a 3-stage medical certification exam. A couple things have struck me as we have explored this together. 1) For his English tutoring we looked at some medical articles (I work at a university with a medical school, so I picked a few with general topics and written without complicated grammatical structures). Each of these articles introduced him to some new "modern" concept which he quickly was disseminated to and subsequently utilized by him and his colleagues. It seems that in Russia they simply don't have much access to international medical literature. 2) Upon reviewing some sample exam questions, my friend honestly did not know the answer to many. It turns out, language was not a siginificant barrier in this area since the latin-based vocabulary is almost identical, but knowledge was!

I think you probably know this already but ... some things to keep in mind, for what it's worth.