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zcyka
12-12-2004, 01:38
Ran across this - not sure what to make of a couple of them. Kindly forgive me if this has already been considered at length - I couldn't find it by searching the site. Z
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Aussies: Dislike being mistaken for Brits when abroad.
Canadians: Are rather indignant about being mistaken for Americans when abroad.
Americans: Encourage being mistaken for Canadians when abroad.
Brits: Can't possibly be mistaken for anyone else when abroad.

Aussies: Believe you should look out for your mates.
Brits: Believe that you should look out for those people who belong to your club.
Americans: Believe that people should look out for and take care of themselves.
Canadians: Believe that that's the government's job.

Aussies: Are extremely patriotic to their beer.
Americans: Are flag-waving, anthem-singing patriots to the point of blindness.
Canadians: Can't agree on the words to their anthem, when they can be bothered to sing it.
Brits: Do not sing at all but prefer a large brass band to perform the anthem.

Americans: Spend most of their lives glued to the idiot box.
Canadians: Don't watch much TV, but only because they can't get more American channels.
Brits: Pay a tax just so they can watch four channels.
Aussies: Export all their crappy programs, which no one there watches, to Britain, where everybody loves them.

Americans: Will jabber on incessantly about football, baseball and basketball.
Brits: Will jabber on incessantly about cricket, soccer and rugby.
Canadians: Will jabber on incessantly about hockey, hockey, hockey, hockey, and how they beat the Americans twice at baseball.
Aussies: Will jabber on incessantly about how they beat the Poms (Brits) in every sport they play them in.

Americans: Spell words differently, but still call it "English."
Brits: Pronounce their words differently, but still call it "English."
Canadians: Spell like Brits, pronounce like Americans.
Aussies: Add "G'day," "mate" and a heavy accent to everything they say in an attempt to get laid.

Brits: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
Aussies: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
Americans: Cross the southern border for cheap shopping, gas and liquor in a backwards country.
Canadians: Cross the southern border for cheap shopping, gas and liquor in a backwards country.

Americans: Drink weak, urine-tasting beer.
Canadians: Drink strong, urine-tasting beer.
Brits: Drink warm, beery-tasting urine.
Aussies: Drink anything with alcohol in it.

Americans: Seem to think that poverty and failure are morally suspect.
Canadians: Seem to believe that wealth and success are morally suspect.
Brits: Seem to believe that wealth, poverty, success, and failure are inherited things.
Aussies: Seem to think that none of this matters after several beers.

capone
12-12-2004, 07:54
America makes some of the best beer in the world, although only about 10% of beer drinkers there are aware of this fact.

Maine Surfer
12-12-2004, 13:34
that's for sure. It's just the other 90% only drink bud, rolling rock and coors light. YAK!

kniga
12-12-2004, 14:03
Maine Surfer,

Woe, you are right. In my sleepy little Southern seaport village, I once asked a bar owner why he didn't offer more than three beers. He replied that he had once attempted to broaden the available selections, but they sat on the shelf until they went flat because all his patrons ever ordered was "Bud," "Bud Light" and "Bud Ice."

capone
12-12-2004, 14:37
Russia has local brews too, but it's all crap like Yarpivo 'Elite.'

pengwn9
12-12-2004, 17:40
Originally posted by capone
Russia has local brews too, but it's all crap like Yarpivo 'Elite.'

Excuse moi, Capone, but there is some very tasty brew made in Russia. Some very decent micro brews. Did you go to the beer festival last summer? I found several Russian beers very much to my liking. Problem is, most of them are hard to find.

And I might add that even some of the more industrial type beers are pretty drinkable. I've put away my fair share of Stary Melnik, and that commonly found Siberian whachamacallit is worthy of consumption.

Maine Surfer
12-12-2004, 20:14
Originally posted by kniga
Maine Surfer,

Woe, you are right. In my sleepy little Southern seaport village, I once asked a bar owner why he didn't offer more than three beers. He replied that he had once attempted to broaden the available selections, but they sat on the shelf until they went flat because all his patrons ever ordered was "Bud," "Bud Light" and "Bud Ice."
Kniga, you know what's sad? Although my basic choice always was either heineken or becks (the only european brands they offered back home), after 8 years or so in Maine I started ordering bud and coors light :o and thinking it's not too bad. Shame on me.

It's not like they can't brew good beer in America, it's they brew what people would buy.

My favorite American microbrewery is Shipyard

lochnessmonster
12-12-2004, 21:32
Peng, what a life, you seem to spend your life between cucumber festivals and beer festivals and that market by Kievskaya. I really eny you!

pengwn9
12-12-2004, 23:19
Early retirement seems to suit me nicely :thumbsup:

capone
12-12-2004, 23:35
Originally posted by pengwn9
Excuse moi, Capone, but there is some very tasty brew made in Russia. Some very decent micro brews. Did you go to the beer festival last summer? I found several Russian beers very much to my liking. Problem is, most of them are hard to find.

And I might add that even some of the more industrial type beers are pretty drinkable. I've put away my fair share of Stary Melnik, and that commonly found Siberian whachamacallit is worthy of consumption.

Well sure you have Tinkoff and a few random pubs brew their own, but whenever you have the 'local grog' of a place like Yaroslavl or Ivanova, it seems less like a proper microbrew and more like Pittsburgh' beer Iron City (the only beer in a steel can!)

A joke my friend told me about Melnik:

Q: What's the difference between Efes and Melnik?

A: In order to get urine, you must drink the Efes....

zcyka
13-12-2004, 00:12
LOL

Ya know, I envisioned that posting having the potential for stirring up sociological comments galore.

Ned? Pretty much spot on, is it?


:D

half crazed visigoth
13-12-2004, 01:20
Brits: Believe that you should look out for those people who belong to your club.

Am aware of comedy intent of posting but foreigners tend to subscribe to the jolly hockey sticks view of Englishmen being arrogant class- rigid swine who look down on everyone else...well, ladies and gents- we are no longer class rigid:)

seriously, that one ranks with the London-shrouded-in-fog stereotype for irrelevance due to being out of date by, oooh, one hundred years....

Brits: Do not sing at all but prefer a large brass band to perform the anthem.

brass band not required, a kazoo will do as long as I dont have to- and there is no British nation so no national anthem- ask the scots and welsh if "God save the Queen" is their anthem and wake up in casualty:)

Brits: Pay a tax just so they can watch four channels.

fair cop, guv:) but at least we have occasional quality programming, unlike Columbo, Quincy, 90210- need I continue:)

Aussies: Export all their crappy programs, which no one there watches, to Britain, where everybody loves them.
Again, regrettably true:), the british part anyway

Aussies: Will jabber on incessantly about how they beat the Poms (Brits) in every sport they play them in.
Which is why we remind them of the Rugby World Cup final at every opportunity:)


Brits: Pronounce their words differently, but still call it "English."

Last time I checked, English was the language of England, which is somewhere, and I must check this, in BRITAIN....


Brits: Seem to believe that wealth, poverty, success, and failure are inherited things.

Again see comment on class rigidity...


Right that should set the cat amongst the pigeons- see ya later

WillsRN
13-12-2004, 05:41
"Brits: Pronounce their words differently, but still call it English.
Last time I checked, English was the language of England, which is somewhere, and I must check this, in BRITAIN...."


Wrong me lad,
English is now spoken worldwide . It is the language of international flight, the language of international business, the language of international medicine etc.
English merely had its early beginning in England, at least thats where it started spreading from due to British colonization. Its origin was actually on the European continent by a small tribe called the Angles who migrated to the Island of Britain. This was old english and very few people in the world can understand it or even recognize it because it sounds so germanic.
Modern english language has evolved from its influence by almost every language spoken today. That includes the english as spoken by British citizens today.
Question: Where is the purest form of Elizabethan english spoken today? Name a town or city either in England or America.

lochnessmonster
13-12-2004, 10:19
Ross-on-wye

kniga
13-12-2004, 11:39
WillsRN,

The most pure Elizabethan English is spoken in the small "hollers" (valleys) of the Apalachan mountains on the eastern seaboard of America, which have remained mostly isolated for three hundred years.

kniga
13-12-2004, 11:45
Maine Surfer,

Right, they do brew good beers in America, only you have to go to the far Northwest to Washington State to find all the wonderful little microbreweries that have sprung up like proverbial mushrooms, especially in and around Seattle. The Scandinavians who settled there brought great brewing skills with them. As to the South, there's little hope that such "effete" brews will gain a foothold in a hot land where a cold beer gets thrown down after mowing the lawn to slake one's thirst, not create the pleasure gained from drinking a good beer like Red Hook Ale from Seattle or Anchor Steam beer or porter from San Francisco. Coors Light? Rumor has it that this brew is shipped from Russia as rejects from Starij Melnik...

jules
13-12-2004, 16:41
Canadians: Are rather indignant about being mistaken for Americans when abroad.

Too true.


Canadians: Can't agree on the words to their anthem, when they can be bothered to sing it.

We generally stick to the first verse, first in English and then in French. If we sing it.


Canadians: Don't watch much TV, but only because they can't get more American channels.

We have the CRTC to protect us from all that US garbage on TV. ;)


Canadians: Will jabber on incessantly about hockey, hockey, hockey, hockey, and how they beat the Americans twice at baseball.

Well, if the US played football the right way, we'd jabber about that too.


Canadians: Spell like Brits, pronounce like Americans.

Not everything - we don't write 'gaol' or 'kerb' though we do write 'favourite' and 'colour' - plus of course a good quarter of the population speaks French, which doesn't sound at all like American...


Americans: Cross the southern border for cheap shopping, gas and liquor in a backwards country.
Canadians: Cross the southern border for cheap shopping, gas and liquor in a backwards country.

LOL :D


Americans: Drink weak, urine-tasting beer.
Canadians: Drink strong, urine-tasting beer.

Being from a Canadian port town, I often heard stories about US sailors ordering huge quantities of beer and then collapsing under the table before drinking half of it - Canadian beer is considerably stronger. Of course, ginger ale is stronger than American beer. ;)


Canadians: Seem to believe that wealth and success are morally suspect.

No, just taxable at a higher rate. ;)

WillsRN
13-12-2004, 18:25
Exactly right, the purest form of early modern English is spoken in America particularly in the Appalachian mountains and along the barrier islands of the east coast US where the inhabitants have been isolated from the changes in modern English language. There are too many towns to name just one. I think you can find their linguistic equals by reading W.S.'s plays.

Shatneresque
13-12-2004, 18:28
Originally posted by jules
Canadians: Cross the southern border for cheap shopping, gas and liquor in a backwards country.

Yeah, but your money doesn't buy as much as the locals'. :D

am4rw
13-12-2004, 20:54
Originally posted by kniga
Coors Light? Rumor has it that this brew is shipped from Russia as rejects from Starij Melnik...

The Coors brewery is located at the mouth of Clear Creek Canyon in Colorado. Most people living up the canyon don't have indoor plumbing, and the mountains are mostly rock. Therefore, the outhouses run off into the creek. Is this the same type of water used to brew Stary Melnick?

kniga
14-12-2004, 00:05
Yeah, only there are no rocks to filter Stary Melnik.

plastique
14-12-2004, 00:39
Originally posted by WillsRN
"Question: Where is the purest form of Elizabethan english spoken today? Name a town or city either in England or America.

Neither. It is in Stratford Ontario Canada.

that's where the world famous Shakespeare fest is....all Eliz. Eng. all the time.

half crazed visigoth
14-12-2004, 00:56
Originally posted by WillsRN
Exactly right, the purest form of early modern English is spoken in America particularly in the Appalachian mountains and along the barrier islands of the east coast US where the inhabitants have been isolated from the changes in modern English language. There are too many towns to name just one. I think you can find their linguistic equals by reading W.S.'s plays.
While not wishing to gainsay your apparent facts( I cannot check them and the concept of "purest" is surely open to
interpretation), this was not the point of the post- or perhaps it was an interesting aside, in which case ignore me...surely if we are English we can lay claim to being the "owners" of the language and therefore it is you bunch who are the heretics?

I take your point of it that English is international and there is no "ownership" as such, but it was not we who hath introduced such concepts by implication....

Interesting stuff re the appalachians though- is this because of lack of literacy in earlier years? It seems standardisation arises when grammar is taught in schools....

koba65
14-12-2004, 02:43
Originally posted by WillsRN
Exactly right, the purest form of early modern English is spoken in America particularly in the Appalachian mountains and along the barrier islands of the east coast US where the inhabitants have been isolated from the changes in modern English language. There are too many towns to name just one. I think you can find their linguistic equals by reading W.S.'s plays.


That would be my home state............. Go into the hollows (hollers) and you'll hear it...

Squirrel_Hunter
14-12-2004, 08:07
The tried and true guiness way - how many rings do you leave in a pint glass filled with Guiness????
I met a young Russian lady who left 23 rings!!!!:alien:

boscoe
14-12-2004, 08:12
The English language is living... however, the Americans are trying to murder it :)

Squirrel_Hunter
14-12-2004, 08:18
Nope - people from Boston are trying to murder it - don't group us all together!!!!!