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View Full Version : Folder to support social welfare efforts in Russia



trebor
10-12-2004, 10:49
Dear All,
Lets put our differences aside and just consider the following:

Many expats enjoy a prosperous lifestyle while residing in Russia Their companies take care of housing in a few cases transportation, utilities, medical insurance too. In addition many receive additional incentive pay for living overseas and tax reduction benefits (if they pay tax at all!), paid holidays with regular paid flights back home etc etc.
Yet all around us, many Russians live with terrible hardship and at the bottom of the scale are those who are least well off, those that can ONLY rely on the goodness of others for survival.
Street kids, disabled, mentaly ill etc etc etc.
Recognizing this disparity many expats (and perhaps their employers too) would like to get either personally or financially involved in providing life-changing opportunities to those in need all around them.


I propose opening a folder, it could be called for example "Giving Back........." and what better time of year to do it?

Open a folder now asking for ideas and suggestions.
Perhaps US. Embassy, British Embassy etc. has a list of Bone Fide charities that the "Giving Back........." folder could recomend
Maybe other groups could help like, ANZA Social Welfare Activities they could suggest ligitimate organisations.
Direct contacts could be listed in the "Giving Back........."folder and those that want to get involved can do so directly.

veejay
10-12-2004, 10:59
I second this idea...

moscowmail
10-12-2004, 11:49
I third and finalize it, Trebor, you ARE a nice person after all, that's it, your street cred is gone...

OK, I will set up the folder, and I would like you to take the lead on it if you don't mind.

kak
10-12-2004, 12:36
I remember that in passport magazine there is a list of charity organization here in Moscow.
this is idea is good, but you do not need to create a special folder for that a sticky thread with a list of organization will be just great!

As i said in "the cafe" you can give you coins ( i mean who really use coins here??) any day any time in a lot of supermarkets

you can give them in the metro (babushkas, kids...etc)

Everyday charity is great as well !:agree:

NB: Do not think only "money"
You can give away your old clothes (ones which are still good but that you just do not wear/like anymore)
You can give food as well...
this is what i have found so far, just searching this board:

Action for Russia's Children (ARC) instead (www.actionarc.com) or the Kitezh Community (www.kitezh.org)
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St. Andrew's Anglican Church, 9 Voznesenskii Pereulok, Fr. Simon Stephens.
Tel: 229 0990
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IWC's Charity Group:

"The IWC Donations Office is very grateful to receive donations of clothing, footwear, household items, toys etc which you may no longer need, for distribution to IWC-supported projects. The office is open Monday mornings 11 1, office mobile: 8-916-136-4955. For more information, please contact Arlete Martins: arletem2003@yahoo.com, tel: 280-03-42."
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"Dear All!

We are collecting clothing for a local orphanage for children between the ages of six and eighteen. Outer clothing and footwear are most needed, but anything would of course help.

Please contact me by e-mail ledka@mail.ru or pm here.
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you can also contact the International Christian Assembly which takes teams of volunteers and donated items to various needy children's homes (usually on outskirts of city) and needy families every last Saturday of the month. You can even join them on any one of these trips. Either way - donated items are always put to good use.
Contact: + 7 (095) 735-38-53; 735-38-54
e-mail: icam@list.ru
ATTN:Barnabas Dazih for Orphanage Ministry
For more info on church visit: http://assembli.narod.ru/ag_maineng.htm
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A small NGO helping poor families and child institutions is looking for children's clothes, shoes, food, soap, detergents, school things, etc.

We are also looking for people who could help a family type orphanage in Kherson, Ukraine.

Please contact Anton at antonsm2002@hotmail.com (Englsish, Russian, French, Italian) or Zhanna (or Victoria) at 203-13-06, weekdays, noon to 7 p.m., Russian only.
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he IWC's Charity Group will pick up anything for donation. Call 229 3803 for more information and to arrange a convenient pick up time/date.
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http://www.charity-tcf.ru/sponsor_to_child.html
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http://www.downsideup.org/
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http://www.roofnet.org/
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a big list here:
http://www.infoservices.com/moscow/168.htm

trebor
10-12-2004, 12:57
Originally posted by moscowmail
I third and finalize it, Trebor, you ARE a nice person after all, that's it, your street cred is gone...

OK, I will set up the folder, and I would like you to take the lead on it if you don't mind.

No problem MM but do remember i am in Vladivostok. I don't mind doing anything by email or internet though:)

moscowmail
10-12-2004, 15:21
Cheers Trebor

The folder is ready

Kak, I will put a sticky with your stuff up for general info

85StoneWhiteFurball
10-12-2004, 16:28
Can something like blood donation info be put in the new folder?

DPG
10-12-2004, 16:32
More for the medical folder I think - if you have a load of info on it, PM it to me and I'll sticky it...

85StoneWhiteFurball
10-12-2004, 16:33
Will have next Tues after I donate again at another centre.

Sparafucile
10-12-2004, 20:25
This is an excellent idea, let us try to support it, and have our companies etc support it too?

Just a plea... there is certainly destitution in Moscow - but it's as nothing compared with some places in Russia's more miserable provinces. Can we try to make sure that at least some of what we do reaches a little further than Moscow... to Siberia, to the South, and to the North? You've not seen poverty in Russian until you've seen Anadyr :-(

So what are we going to do - and when? :-)

One sad but strangely-cheering fact is that it's within the resources of individuals to make a real difference in Russia - a little will truly go a long way. For example, our company helps a Children's Home near Bratsk. It started when we read in a newspaper that the kids there can't go outside in winter - because they don't have any shoes :-( All that stood between them and going outdoors was $300 (in total for all kids in the Home), but it was three hundred bucks they didn't have.

stefania2003
10-12-2004, 21:35
Good for Trevor:) I've done my bit in my time as I think everyone has when living in Russia since you can't just ignore people who are suffering on a daily basis through no fault of their own.
There is one thing I'd like to say though and this is a point no-one has raised; that there are two types of expat. One is the expat who has a 'package' usually by reason of signing a contract in his own country and therefore is looked after by his company and very well off. The other sort (of which there are many on this site and of which I was one) are the types who are either freelancers or living on a small salary out of which they have to pay rent, air fares, visas etc. Even so we were better off than the poor Russians but Trevor forgot to mention the second category so I"m doing it:)
Another (maybe less popular) point is that I think charity begins at home (corny but true) and why can't the rich and even affluent (i.e. not super rich but doing very well thank you) Russians help their own people?
I'm sure some do but not nearly enough!

M-C
11-12-2004, 11:51
why can't the rich and even affluent (i.e. not super rich but doing very well thank you) Russians help their own people?
Good question! One reason is that rich people schedule their lives so that they don't see poverty (no metro riding, no shopping in average shops....), the other is that if you do stg, on a modest scale, there often is hell to pay. In the 90's we used to collect stuff from Berlin (from hospital beds to kids' clothes) and bring the stuff over, this meant loading the stuff into ancient lorries, driving the unheated monsters to Moscow usually in winter as Christmas time is the best to get donations, dealing with all kinds of trouble on the way, unloading everything, storing and distributing it. Generally speaking we were not thanked for our efforts and vastly criticised for not giving more and better things. One can only take so much of that crap, we took it for 6 years.
On the other hand Russians seem to give pretty freely to beggars, as opposed to westerners (at home I mean) and are sensitive to cries for help (at least the people I know are), if someone has a network of friends, he can usually rely on their support to a certain extent at least.... They are also more tolerant with alcoholics, homeless people and general despondancy than westerners tend to be. Everybody knows that there is no guarantee here.

stefania2003
11-12-2004, 15:51
A nice posting, MC:) Yes, the Russians who give to beggars are those who actually SEE them i.e. the ordinary Russians who ride the metro. The ones who could make the real difference have their pockets tightly sewn up and I suppose they could be made to give via taxes but then you don't know who the money goes to etc. To be honest, charity is voluntary and these people will never want to help others.

J.D.
11-12-2004, 17:14
Originally posted by stefania2003

Another (maybe less popular) point is that I think charity begins at home (corny but true) and why can't the rich and even affluent (i.e. not super rich but doing very well thank you) Russians help their own people?
I'm sure some do but not nearly enough!

Even so it has no bearing on us if we want to help. Not to mention my home is Moscow. And I also consider the whole world to be my home.