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alterego
06-12-2004, 17:30
The question is 'What is dinner?'

This is for native speakers and please indicate what country you are from.

Shatneresque
06-12-2004, 17:44
Where I lived in the US (the Upper Midwest), "dinner" was usually the day's biggest and most important meal, and was eaten by most people in the evening.

J.D.
06-12-2004, 17:47
During the week dinner was in the evening when dad came home and we had a big family meal. On Sunday dinner was a big family meal at lunch time after we got home from church.

DPG
06-12-2004, 17:49
South of the UK - Dinner IS the meal eaten in the evening!;-)

Breakfast
11ses
Lunch
Afternoon Tea
Dinner
Supper
Midnight snack

Would be the most common order of meals I think...

CaveMan
06-12-2004, 17:50
Well slightly contradicting but in London everybody called lunch 'Dinner'.....

kak
06-12-2004, 17:51
evening meal. (i'm a "native speaker" of ...french)

kak
06-12-2004, 17:52
Originally posted by DPG
South of the UK - Dinner IS the meal eaten in the evening!;-)


Dinner
Supper




what's the difference?

:confused: ;)

veejay
06-12-2004, 17:55
To me as a transplanted New Englander, dinner is the evening meal. However, to my very Southern family, dinner was lunch, and supper was the evening meal. In any case, the evening meal was normally the main meal...although now I go for the lunch meal being the main meal of the day.

DPG
06-12-2004, 17:59
Erol Ver - You must have been mixing with people from the north of the UK (who often call lunch dinner and dinner supper!)!

Kak - Usually dinner is an actual meal, and supper is something small you eat before going to bed.

Halyavshik
06-12-2004, 18:15
Originally posted by DPG
South of the UK - Dinner IS the meal eaten in the evening!;-)

Breakfast
11ses
Lunch
Afternoon Tea
Dinner
Supper
Midnight snack

Would be the most common order of meals I think...

And that's not counting the Snickers bars they have in their pockets to tide them over between tea, dinner and supper.

jchidg1
06-12-2004, 18:42
DPG - you've forgotten High Tea.
Honestly. Prole.

peyote
06-12-2004, 19:22
mmm, high tea... sounds like my kind of tea... ;)

so is it the last dinner or the last supper?

boscoe
06-12-2004, 19:48
dinner in the north of England is usually lunch - Tea is the evening meal

boscoe
06-12-2004, 19:52
What will it be for tea tonight...hope it's beefburgers....preferably two... might be mushrooms, or fried onion rings... You'll have to wait and see...(altogether now) WE HOPE IT'S CHIPS, IT'S CHIPS...WE HOPE IT'S CHIPS, IT'S CHIPS

Braders
06-12-2004, 19:58
Originally posted by boscoe
What will it be for tea tonight...hope it's beefburgers....preferably two... might be mushrooms, or fried onion rings... You'll have to wait and see...(altogether now) WE HOPE IT'S CHIPS, IT'S CHIPS...WE HOPE IT'S CHIPS, IT'S CHIPS

Always knew you were a White Van Man!

Boscoe is indeed correct though Din-Dins is eaten around midday ;)

Shatneresque
06-12-2004, 20:53
Originally posted by peyote
mmm, high tea... sounds like my kind of tea... ;)
so is it the last dinner or the last supper?

"High Tea," if I'm not mistaken, is the lovely British custom of having a lavish late afternoon snack of tea and cakes, fruit tarts, cucumber sandwiches, scones with clotted cream, etc.

Visit any large city in the UK, and you'll see hotels, restaurants, cafes, all advertising "High Teas."

DPG
06-12-2004, 21:22
That's afternoon tea, Shatner...high tea usually has a couple of hot snacks as well and would be served slightly later!

Nagant Guy
06-12-2004, 23:42
Here in Texas dinner is either lunch or supper. Size of meal is not important to the definition.

"High Tea" sounds like something you could get arrested for smoking!

CaveMan
07-12-2004, 14:30
Originally posted by Shatneresque
"High Tea," if I'm not mistaken, is the lovely British custom of having a lavish late afternoon snack of tea and cakes, fruit tarts, cucumber sandwiches, scones with clotted cream, etc.

Visit any large city in the UK, and you'll see hotels, restaurants, cafes, all advertising "High Teas."

It is correct and can I order for one????

I am dying for a fresh scone w/ strawberry jam !!!!

DPG
07-12-2004, 14:34
People!!

AFTERNOON TEA is the one with finger sandwiches, scones, jam, pastries etc.

High tea was actually originally a working class meal that was in effect dinner (coming home from coalmines, factories etc) and included hot dishes such as shepard's pie, meat pies etc, some vegetables perhaps and yes, you guessed it, tea!

It's called high tea (as opposed to low tea - another name for afternoon tea) because of the different heights of the tables from which the meals are eaten.

peyote
07-12-2004, 14:36
so nothing to do with amsterdam's tea? what a disappointment! :(

DPG
07-12-2004, 14:38
After being down a coalmine all day, their lungs were already full of coke - no need for anything more!!;)

trebor
07-12-2004, 18:57
I've never heard anyone in the UK ever use the word supper!
Have you?

DPG
07-12-2004, 19:01
I haven't used it myself, but have heard others doing so...

trebor
07-12-2004, 19:08
Originally posted by DPG
I haven't used it myself, but have heard others doing so...

Yeah. so have i now i come to think about it.....................................i saw that movie Oliver Twist last week!:D

bushmaster
07-12-2004, 19:22
Dinner is before Supper.

trebor
07-12-2004, 20:16
Originally posted by bushmaster
Dinner is before Supper.

So's breakfast!:D

plastique
08-12-2004, 16:54
Originally posted by DPG
South of the UK - Dinner IS the meal eaten in the evening!;-)

Breakfast
11ses
Lunch
Afternoon Tea
Dinner
Supper
Midnight snack

Would be the most common order of meals I think...

you people really are the decendents of hobbits...dear lord can you eat any more? and we americans are the fatties!

DJ Biscuit
08-12-2004, 17:04
Originally posted by Nagant Guy
Here in Texas dinner is either lunch or supper.



LOL.

So, if dinner is lunch or supper, then what are lunch and supper?

:D

jchidg1
08-12-2004, 17:49
Dinner (lunch) is actually luncheon, dinner may be eaten at suppertime, depending on whether it is pre or post theatre. Tea is served in the afternoon but not the evening, if tea is served in the evening, it is supper. Hope that clears it up.


Oh and by the way - we forgot BRUNCH...which comes between breakfast and elevenses.

DJ Biscuit
08-12-2004, 18:01
I hope you weren't replying to my post above!

I honestly do not understand how people say Dinner when they are talking about a meal at 1pm.

J.D.
08-12-2004, 18:02
I've been wracking (sp?) my brains but I can't figure out which comes first, a midnight snack or the 2am nursing.

J.D.
08-12-2004, 18:03
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
I hope you weren't replying to my post above!

I honestly do not understand how people say Dinner when they are talking about a meal at 1pm.

and you're in the restaraunt biz?

trebor
08-12-2004, 19:16
Originally posted by J.D.
and you're in the restaraunt biz?

No one in the restaurant biz will refere to Lunch as Dinner.
That is a meal eaten at Midday.

DJ Biscuit
08-12-2004, 19:28
Originally posted by J.D.
and you're in the restaraunt biz?

Yes, that's why I know that lunch is at 1pm and dinner is the evening meal.

It also seems most HORECA people know this fact too, I've seen heaps of places advertising 'Business Lunch 12-3pm' but can't remember any which said 'Business dinner 12-3pm.'

Kshisya
08-12-2004, 19:44
:rolleyes: i voted for morning! :suspect: well nobody else did so it should've been me :p

DJ Biscuit
08-12-2004, 19:50
Actually by the time I get up it is lunchtime!

Kshisya
08-12-2004, 19:58
Originally posted by DJ Biscuit
Actually by the time I get up it is lunchtime!

yea but there is another side of it ;) if for example one stayed in Albion for too late :shame: that person comes home at 3-4 am and craving for some :lovepot: food...it's too early to call that meal breakfast + you still didn't get to sleep SO I assume that tis early morning but in reality it is only dinner....well a bit belated but still ;)



by the way fancy some CrunchieS on Friday? ;) :D

J.D.
08-12-2004, 20:33
At what time do you have Christmas dinner?

DJ Biscuit
10-12-2004, 14:16
Originally posted by J.D.
At what time do you have Christmas dinner?

Personally, I don't but Christmas Dinner would be 6:30 for 7pm and Christmas Lunch is at 1pm.

WilliamFTH
10-09-2007, 21:39
Human body is not naturally build for 3 meals; people have 3 meals cos we need to spend most time working so we set a fix interval to refuel our self.

The size of our tummy is actually the size of a fist and food will be fully digested in 3 hours so we should have 5 to 6 meals a day pending what time you wake up and what time you go to sleep.

As for me, the heaviest meal of the day is lunch and dinner is the second lightest meal of the day after a glass of milk 2 hours before bedtime.

SalTheReturn
10-09-2007, 22:10
dunno what the question is about

in Italy dinner is an evening meal usually much lighter than lunch

on the other hand for many workers it is an important meal because being out all day it is the only serious meal they will enjoy


much more interesting: AT WHAT TIME IS DINNER CONSUMED IN YOUR COUNTRY? AND LUNCH?

In Italy lunch is in the range 12:30-14 and dinner 19:30-20:30

recently though many people get to eat later and later

Len Ganley Stance
10-09-2007, 22:58
Dinner?

I have no idea what that is. By the timeI get home, I'm usually told - 'Your dinner's in the dog'

Judge
10-09-2007, 23:00
Dinner?

I have no idea what that is. By the timeI get home, I'm usually told - 'Your dinner's in the dog'


Atleast your wife cooks dinner....

Len Ganley Stance
10-09-2007, 23:01
after a glass of milk 2 hours before bedtime.

I take it that you haven't tried the Milk here in Russia yet?

tzaritsa
10-09-2007, 23:15
DPG - you've forgotten High Tea.
Honestly. Prole.
Please,tell me what is it High Tea!I`ve never ever heard about It!Please!:confused::rules:

Aussie Mark
25-09-2007, 09:13
"High Tea," if I'm not mistaken, is the lovely British custom of having a lavish late afternoon snack of tea and cakes, fruit tarts, cucumber sandwiches, scones with clotted cream, etc.

Visit any large city in the UK, and you'll see hotels, restaurants, cafes, all advertising "High Teas."

WOW this is an old thread revisited... Shatneresque (great name...) got it right though...:agree:

pablo1uk
04-10-2007, 13:05
Always knew you were a White Van Man!

Boscoe is indeed correct though Din-Dins is eaten around midday ;)

Bein a Manc i'd have to agree :-)

JohnnyLomo
06-10-2007, 21:14
Bein a Manc i'd have to agree :-)

So, I aint the only Manc here!