PDA

View Full Version : More on cilantro ("kinza") and coriander ("koriandr")....



Shatneresque
04-12-2004, 11:32
Nota bene: The following is intended as helpful advice for anyone planning to cook with the above two seasonings, and NOT as part of any ongoing dispute.

Taken directly from pages 285 and 286 of the New Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant cookbook (Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, CA, 1987):

Cilantro: The fresh green leaves of coriander, called cilantro (sometimes Spanish or Chinese parsley), are used in many cuisines, particularly East Indian, Asian, and Central and South American.

Coriander: When we call for coriander in this book, we are referring to the dried seeds, a spice. Fresh cilantro [an herb], which is very pungent and is usually an acquired taste, is very different from dried, ground coriander seeds and cannot be used interchangeably [my emphasis]. Coriander imparts a delightful aroma and sweet flavor and is best when freshly ground....

JTK

PS: In American English, the "h" in "herb" (as opposed to "Herb") is silent, thereby requiring the use of the article "an".

trebor
04-12-2004, 11:54
Shatneresque
perhaps in Americanese they would say that but i have never heard it said in the UK.
We say coriander for leaves and seeds.

Shatneresque
04-12-2004, 12:36
Ho-hum! :o

Disclaimer, disclaimer, read the bloody disclaimer, willya...? :rolleyes:

The point is, linguistic usage may vary, but one should use one's common sense when following a recipe.

If you're baking pastry and the recipe calls for coriander, you will end up with something unpalatable if you substitute the leaves for the seeds.

Likewise, you want to use the leaves and not the seeds when making fresh salsa.

For a great many people, using one word to refer to both the leaves and the seeds of the coriander plant leads to unneccessary confusion.

Suggest you check out the many items about the two that are available on the Internet....

Yeeesh!

:snoring:

Tatiana cat
04-12-2004, 18:59
It was discussed a while ago... Since then when a conversation starts to be about cooking I say "I know the difference between cilantro and coriander". Funny. And makes people think I understand much in cooking...:D
Thanks Shatner!

(plus I know the difference between corn and maize!)

Even if I'm really cooking (once in a blue moon) I hardly ever will go to the shop to buy kinza or coriander...

Shatneresque
04-12-2004, 19:56
Originally posted by Tatiana cat
It was discussed a while ago... Since then when a conversation starts to be about cooking I say "I know the difference between cilantro and coriander". Funny. And makes people think I understand much in cooking...:D
Thanks Shatner!

(plus I know the difference between corn and maize!)

Even if I'm really cooking (once in a blue moon) I hardly ever will go to the shop to buy kinza or coriander...

Thank you, Kitty Cat! :D

trebor
04-12-2004, 22:06
Originally posted by Shatneresque
Ho-hum! :o


The point is, linguistic usage may vary, but one should use one's common sense
:snoring:

MY DISCLAIMER:
I don't have the courage to be contrversial so i will post something and claim its for information only!


Don't give me that sh*t about a disclaimer! You wanted to post that to carry on the discussion! Just Admit it!!!............................SSSSSHHHHHEEEESSSSHHHH! :rolleyes:
You posted that just for our information??? in case someone should confuse the two???.............................YER RIGHT!

And as i said ONLY IN THE STATES!

boscoe
05-12-2004, 17:21
It’s clear that the Americans have two different names for seeds and leaves and the Brits have one name but differentiate by using ‘coriander seeds’ or ‘coriander leaves’

No need to argue any more… Thread closed