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Judge
11-08-2009, 19:34
I know russians love tea but this is going a bit too far..


Woman in hot water after attacking the Mona Lisa with a mug of English Breakfast tea
Read more: Woman sparks security alert after hurling a mug at the Mona Lisa | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1205735/Woman-sparks-security-alert-hurling-mug-Mona-Lisa.html#ixzz0NtBKyZ2k)

trebor
11-08-2009, 19:52
"Doctors were trying to assess whether she was suffering from Stendhal Syndrome, a rare condition that causes dizziness, confusion or violent acts when an individual is exposed to art."

I better get myself off to the doctor's tomorrow. I suffer the same symptoms when i listen to the Beastie Boys!

Qdos
11-08-2009, 20:14
She was obviously drinking tea with the Mad Hatter... :rofl:

FatAndy
11-08-2009, 20:41
2 Judge:
but this is going a bit too far.. - does it mean you propose next poor Russian woman to do it with a glass of vodka? Don't please. Any real Russian will not dare at such sacrilege... :D
Hussssh! It was Tw!#!#&$ "product placement" action! ;)

Judge
12-08-2009, 09:23
2 Judge:
but this is going a bit too far.. - does it mean you propose next poor Russian woman to do it with a glass of vodka? Don't please. Any real Russian will not dare at such sacrilege... :D
Hussssh! It was Tw!#!#&$ "product placement" action! ;)

If anyone is drinking vodka in the Louvre they are not there for the art.
You are right, somethings are more precious than a man in drag.:p

FatAndy
12-08-2009, 11:44
If anyone is drinking vodka in the Louvre they are not there for the art. - maybe you've just never tried to combine not "pleasant and useful" but "pleasant and pleasant"? ;)

romanexpress
12-08-2009, 12:10
Are you a Teadrinker? :plane: How many cups should you drink in order to avoid addiction?

robertmf
23-08-2009, 03:54
Horror stories about the food industry have long been with us ever since 1906, when Upton Sinclair's landmark novel The Jungle told some ugly truths about how America produces its meat. In the century that followed, things got much better, and in some ways much worse. The U.S. agricultural industry can now produce unlimited quantities of meat and grains at remarkably cheap prices. But it does so at a high cost to the environment, animals and humans. Those hidden prices are the creeping erosion of our fertile farmland, cages for egg-laying chickens so packed that the birds can't even raise their wings :yuk: and the scary rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among farm animals. Add to the price tag the acceleration of global warming our energy-intensive food system uses 19% of U.S. fossil fuels, more than any other sector of the economy.

And perhaps worst of all, our food is increasingly bad for us, even dangerous :11629:.

Getting Real About the High Price of Cheap Food - TIME (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1917458,00.html)