PDA

View Full Version : An American Wrestler



obviv90kg
31-07-2009, 03:20
Hello, I am new to this forum and never been in one. I'll go ahead and appologize if this has been asked asked and answered before but i really need help.

I am from Texas and after getting back from a (judo) training camp at the Ukrainian Olympic Training Center. I was invited to train with one of the teams in Moscow. This is a HUGE dream of mine but several obstacles are currently standing in my way.

1.) I am thinking of getting certified as a english teacher (TEFL, TESOL, etc.) but i am not sure which one to take or if it matters or if the certs actually hold any merit.

2.) Will i be able to get a job?

3.) How much money do i need to bring over?

4.) How long will it take to get a visa?

5.) Will i be able to get an apartment and employment before moving?

6.) Is it really as dangerous to live in Moscow as my parents are trying to make it seem :)


Any additional information would be MUCH appreciated.

Thank you much for your time :)

pjw
31-07-2009, 03:32
Welcome to the forum.

There are people who will be here tomorrow who can answer your questions. Meanwhile enjoy looking through forum. It's a good resource and fun place to meet locals and expats.

e.k.
31-07-2009, 16:46
Hey there. Glad to offer a little advice.

I don't know much about wrestling here (as opposed to MMA), but I'm Moscow based and if you read Sherdog, you'll have read some of my stuff from time to time...

Having said that I'd imagine training wrestling in Russia would be a great, if very different, experience.

So I'd def give that a go if I were you. In regard to the your questions, I've tried to briefly answer them below.

1.) I am thinking of getting certified as a english teacher (TEFL, TESOL, etc.) but i am not sure which one to take or if it matters or if the certs actually hold any merit.

I'm not sure about teaching English here at all, but I'd imagine this path isn't the quickest one. The main question that has to be asked is how long are you staying? If it's really long, like 6 months, then a job in order to get a visa is a good idea. If it's less than a month then a visitor visa should be fine... If teaching English is the way to go, I'd look at websites of English schools here, and what they say in terms of their tutors qualifications.

2.) Will i be able to get a job?

How good are you at getting work? You should come with enough money to stay a month or so and a ticket back home. If nothing works out you're not stranded.

3.) How much money do i need to bring over?

Depends on what your accomodation and living arrangements will be. For everything in Moscow, over one month, about USD$2K should do it. Having said that you could live a lot cheaper, but $2K gives you a little cushioning.

4.) How long will it take to get a visa?

A week or so, after you take the invitation (you have to get that emailed over from Russia, but it's pretty easy - it costs about $50) to the Russian consulate.

5.) Will i be able to get an apartment and employment before moving?

You should probably do the apartment thing after arriving, stay in a backpackers first. The employment thing prior to coming is a good idea, try through the Moscow based language schools.

6.) Is it really as dangerous to live in Moscow as my parents are trying to make it seem.

No.

If you keep your wits about you, just like in any big city, you should be absolutely fine. Except you should know that people are occasionally attacked by the street bears, but that's reasonably rare now that the bears are provided with a constant, free supply of vodka (government directive to make them more passive).

Kangaroo495
31-07-2009, 17:37
When I saw "American wrestler" I was thinking along the lines of Hulk Hogan, Ultimate Warrior or Undertaker... Would've been my dream to meet one of these guys... Anyway, in regards to your questions, you gotta tell us how long you plan to stay, otherwise any of our advice will be useless.

I've given my point of view on your questions:

1.) I am thinking of getting certified as a english teacher (TEFL, TESOL, etc.) but i am not sure which one to take or if it matters or if the certs actually hold any merit.

In my experience they definitely help. I got a CELTA certification from BKIC Moscow, and landed jobs left right and center.

2.) Will i be able to get a job?

With certification your chances are high. However the crisis has hit extremely hard here, and a lot of people are out of work. I would recommend getting certified, which will triple your chances.

3.) How much money do i need to bring over?

If you do the certification course, check out the prices on the web. As I said, I did mine at BKC-IH. It wasn't overly cheap, but not too expensive. I had to have a phone interview and fill in some questionnaires to get accepted. Rent is ludicrously expensive. Try to find a room in someone else's flat. That will set you back at least $600-700 per month. Living is expensive. I would recommend bringing $4k for the first month, then 2-3 for the rest. But I live pretty expensive.

4.) How long will it take to get a visa?

Not long. The main problem is WHAT visa. Firstly you will need a 1-month tourist, or 3-month business visa. When and if you land a job, you MUST get a job where your employer provides you with a work permit. This is a pain in the ass.

5.) Will i be able to get an apartment and employment before moving?

Employment unlikely. Apartment more likely, but better not to. You should view the apartment first and meet your flat-mate (unless you decide to live alone - will cost an arm and a leg though). Perhaps your training buddies can help you out with this?

6.) Is it really as dangerous to live in Moscow as my parents are trying to make it seem :)

Moscow is for fairies. If you're a wrestler, you should fit in perfectly here. Putin is a black belt in Judo. That should earn you a few friends. I've never felt safer in any other city.

So it's a pretty tough process, but many have done it and succeeded. If you have the motivation you can do it too. I was in a similar situation to you in the beginning. Came with nothing, struggled for a while, but made good. I'm sure you'll be fine.

obviv90kg
28-08-2009, 22:50
thanks for all you're help guys :)

this gives me a much clearer picture, nobody i know has really tryed to move over seas for over a month without already established accomidations and all that.

sorry for the delayed response but this is a big help

right now i am trying to decide between gyms in moscow, canada and the olympic training center (U.S.) at the moment it's kind of a stressful decision and even this amount of help is a blessing

thanx~!