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Jay1
27-07-2009, 00:51
Is the Melnikov House (Krivoarbatsky Lane) open to the public? Also what condition is the building in nowadays?

http://www.c20society.org.uk/images/building/melnikov/melnikov2.jpg

Thanks.

Viola
27-07-2009, 17:49
Jay, as I know it never was open to the public because it belonged to the Melnikov's family, it was their home. They only let journalist in to seek publicity when they felt the threat to the house.
After the death of the Melnikov's son half of the house was sold to one of Russian of oligarkhs who promissed to invest in renovation. I don't know if anything has been done since that time (2-3 years ago). Last thing that I've heard was that Melnikov's dauhgter still has been living there, trying to get some money from the Moscow government for renovation. Seems some money has been allocated but I don't know if renovation started already.
Another Melnikov's building was handed over to the theater and now is under restoration.

Ian G
27-07-2009, 19:35
Yes- it's still there- under threat from developers, but still there. It's surrounded by modern buildings and difficult to see properly. The work 'renovation' (normally 'rekonstruktsiya' in Russian) often means demolishing a historic building and erecting a copy of it with an underground car park under it- so you'd better hurry if you want to see it.

The photo in the above post is the Rusakov Workers' Club, also by Melnikov, and also in Moscow.
Rusakov Workers' Club - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia@@AMEPARAM@@/wiki/File:Ref_pfanner14.jpg" class="image"><img alt="" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/Ref_pfanner14.jpg"@@AMEPARAM@@commons/f/fd/Ref_pfanner14.jpg

Jay1
27-07-2009, 22:53
I guess thereís no such thing as preservation orders in Russia. It would be a crime to bulldoze this one.

Iíll make a point of seeing it this summer.

Thanks.

Viola
28-07-2009, 17:31
Coincidentaly I had a meeting at Arbat area today morning so decided to visit the premises. There are no signs of renovation, a big crack on the wall, obviously someone still lives in the house (Melnikov daughter, I think ?). Actually one can see the street front of the building through the gaps in the wooden fence. I made a try to have a look at the building from the back side and entered the courtyard of the neighbour building but was greeted by a horde of barking dogs, got scared and retreated.
Again en route I visited the exposition of the General plan of Moscow development for Arbat area and tried to find out what are the prospects for the building. No definite info. So I left my opinion in the visitors' book against construction of the big complex next to Melnikov House. Btw anyone who lives or works in this area could leave an opinion. Not only about this area but about any place in Moscow. For Arbat area the address of exposition is 55/32 Arbat street, entrance from Denezhnyi lane, on workdays from noon to 8 pm, on weekends from 10 to 3 pm. Exposition will be open till August,7.

kirk10071
28-07-2009, 18:47
Coincidentaly I had a meeting at Arbat area today morning so decided to visit the premises. There are no signs of renovation, a big crack on the wall, obviously someone still lives in the house (Melnikov daughter, I think ?). Actually one can see the street front of the building through the gaps in the wooden fence. I made a try to have a look at the building from the back side and entered the courtyard of the neighbour building but was greeted by a horde of barking dogs, got scared and retreated.
Again en route I visited the exposition of the General plan of Moscow development for Arbat area and tried to find out what are the prospects for the building. No definite info. So I left my opinion in the visitors' book against construction of the big complex next to Melnikov House. Btw anyone who lives or works in this area could leave an opinion. Not only about this area but about any place in Moscow. For Arbat area the address of exposition is 55/32 Arbat street, entrance from Denezhnyi lane, on workdays from noon to 8 pm, on weekends from 10 to 3 pm. Exposition will be open till August,7.

I was inside the house last week and had a nice tea with the owner.

The woman who lives there is the granddaughter of the architect. He had two children, a son and a daughter. The daughter died and her son (the current owner's husband) transferred his half to a young oligarchy type who used to be a real estate developer. He wants to turn it into a private museum, but there is no such precedent in Russia and no protection that he will not tear it down. She has been offered millions just for the plot.

The son (father of the woman who lives there) also died, and the current occupant and her sister were in litigation for years. As a result of the disputes between her and her sister, preservationists hesitate to fund a restoration for fear that the sister (or the developer referred to above) will take the place.

The current occupant is in her 60s and does the best she can. She has bravely rebuffed efforts to tear down the building. Inside, it it is not in total disrepair, but it definitely could use a remont. All of the orginal fixtures are there and the original wiring, too, can be seen running along the walls and ceilings. The house is full of antiques and original art. But it is crumbling, as all houses do.

I hope her dream will be realized to turn it into a museum, but for the moment it is a private residence, and a very interesting one at that.

Viola
28-07-2009, 19:02
He wants to turn it into a private museum, but there is no such precedent in Russia
What do you mean? No precedent of turning a house/apartment into museum?

Viola
29-07-2009, 11:04
Here (http://www.moskonstruct.org/en/petitionen) anyone could sign a petition in support of conserving Moscow Constructivist and Avant-garde Architecture.

kirk10071
29-07-2009, 17:04
What do you mean? No precedent of turning a house/apartment into museum?

There is no precedent for turning a house into a PRIVATE museum. All the museums are state-run.

Viola
29-07-2009, 20:18
There is no precedent for turning a house into a PRIVATE museum. All the museums are state-run.
There is a lot of private museums in Russia. No problem at all. Most of them set up by ordinary people, not oligarkhs.
For example just three first results from Google search
Music and time (http://music-and-time.narod.ru/)
Gramophones and phonographs (http://www.museum.ru/m2103)
Gentry culture (http://collection.ng.ru/collect/2000-04-05/7_culturemuseum.html)

Viola
25-05-2010, 11:29
The house sinked 40 cm below the ground in last 12 years. This video let you peep into the house.

Melnikov House (http://www.newstube.ru/media/dom-cilindr-stolichnye-vlasti-podarok-ne-ocenili)

ReallyGreatConcerts
25-05-2010, 12:17
There is no precedent for turning a house into a PRIVATE museum. All the museums are state-run.

That's not strictly true, and there are several precedents. For example one of the most famous house-museums in Moscow, the Gorky Museum (aka Rybushinsky's house, Schechtel's style-moderne masterpiece on Spiridonovka), is privately-owned and run. And open to the public :)

Jack17
28-06-2010, 07:06
Who owns/runs the Scriabin kvartira in Arbat?

Viola
28-06-2010, 11:52
Who owns/runs the Scriabin kvartira in Arbat?

I think it is state owned.