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View Full Version : Well then, how do I go about this? (Maybe I can humor you too)



Jetsettermike22
03-07-2009, 05:18
So I'm a newbie here and I would like to live and work in Russia and I was looking into teaching English. You might be thinking, "Great..some backpacker wanting to teach English here...I've heard this one before. And he's an American dude? Probably wants to hook up with a Russian bride." Maybe it's for the girls I'm doing this..I was in the U.S. Navy and I met a lot of Russian girls in my travels and I must say they are beautiful and intelligent. Maybe it's because I've been compelled to visit Russia since I was a kid. Why? James Bond flicks...I dunno. And yeah, I want to teach English because it's a good way to experience a culture firsthand and whatever fresh-faced, doe-eyed stereotypes you can think of. But out of all the places I can teach English with better pay and lower cost of living, I choose Russia. Additional info..yeah, living in Moscow would be OK for a few months, but I would rather live in a smaller town so I can experience the Russian culture better.

Now, I've been reading on the various forums about the McSchools that seem to exploit their teachers, etc. and I ask the forum..if you were in my shoes, and knowing what you know now, what is the best way to go about finding a job in Russia (teaching English or otherwise)? I haven't found any definite answers on how I should start my journey. And please be honest and blunt as possible. I'm a grown man..I can take some potshots. Thank you in advance for your help.

Mike

robertmf
03-07-2009, 06:02
So I'm a newbie here and I would like to live and work in Russia and I was looking into teaching English. You might be thinking, "Great..some backpacker wanting to teach English here...I've heard this one before. And he's an American dude? Probably wants to hook up with a Russian bride." Maybe it's for the girls I'm doing this..I was in the U.S. Navy and I met a lot of Russian girls in my travels and I must say they are beautiful and intelligent. Maybe it's because I've been compelled to visit Russia since I was a kid. Why? James Bond flicks...I dunno. And yeah, I want to teach English because it's a good way to experience a culture firsthand and whatever fresh-faced, doe-eyed stereotypes you can think of. But out of all the places I can teach English with better pay and lower cost of living, I choose Russia. Additional info..yeah, living in Moscow would be OK for a few months, but I would rather live in a smaller town so I can experience the Russian culture better.

Now, I've been reading on the various forums about the McSchools that seem to exploit their teachers, etc. and I ask the forum..if you were in my shoes, and knowing what you know now, what is the best way to go about finding a job in Russia (teaching English or otherwise)? I haven't found any definite answers on how I should start my journey. And please be honest and blunt as possible. I'm a grown man..I can take some potshots. Thank you in advance for your help.

Mike

Welcome !! Look around here for opportunities. You can post at the marketplace. I think you will find some answers. Use the [search] too.

You have to pay attention to the native language and visa requirements.
Вы говорит ?

I suggest you take a trip to Russia before making a firm commitment.

I don't think a cheesehead should have problem with Moscow Winter :-:alien:

Jetsettermike22
03-07-2009, 08:33
Да, Я говорю мало и изучаю русский язык три месяца. My Russian is very basic and I'm just looking for the opportunities to practice.

I got "approved" to take the CELTA course at the BKC and I was slated to go in January. After reading all this info from the forums has made me a little gun-shy, although I am deadset on wanting to live in Russia. My best friend is moving to Colombia, but yet even though I know noone, I'd still rather do Russia.

Even with all the crap that is talked about with the McSchools..is this the best route for a newbie to go or knowing what you know now, would you have taken a different route?

Bels
03-07-2009, 12:10
The Mac schools are the best way for newbies to come to Russia and teach English. You will have a telephone interview fromy your place of residence and if you pass the interview they will help you with all visa, invitation and work permit matters. You will also have a small livable income, a room to sleep in, and your flight costs reimbursed when you complete the work contract. Yes it's either BKC or Language and forget the rest if you are a newbie. Chech out the languagelink link below.

Teacher Recruitment (http://www.languagelink.co.uk/teacher_recruitment.htm)

pjw
03-07-2009, 13:04
Hey Bels,

Is it really as easy as they make it sound? I mean these language link people are talking about 40 a week contracts and competitive rates of pay. Is this real? It sounds a bit too good to be true. Give me the real picture please.

Bels
03-07-2009, 15:44
Hey Bels,

Is it really as easy as they make it sound? I mean these language link people are talking about 40 a week contracts and competitive rates of pay. Is this real? It sounds a bit too good to be true. Give me the real picture please.

Yes it's a well established school here. But I am not sure how well they and others like them are doing at the moment, under the current economic climate. So there may well be less jobs and I would suggest that anyone interested should apply now and only accept the fulltime contract package.

Too good to be true! LOL

Bels
03-07-2009, 16:08
This is the more relevent site for Language link in Russia. You should find more detail about job prospects here

Language Link Corporate Site. Job Opportunities (http://www.jobs.languagelink.ru/jobs/)

pjw
03-07-2009, 16:20
Is there much work in these big Moscow schools at the moment i wonder? Do they have many language schools outside Moscow, i mean in Moscovskaya Oblast, west of the city etc? Or is it all just in the centre?

In my town here, Regensburg 140K people, there was always heaps of work, some really big companies, i was always flooded by work. Now it's totally dried up. There is absolutely nothing now and it'll stay that way for a while i think.

A fulltime contract in a language school here is a fantasy at the moment so when i hear about this being possible elsewhere it sounds very attractive and getting a fulltime contract over the phone sounds really cool. Almost unimaginable. Thanks for the info Bels. I'll check it out. But i have a feeling these schools promise the world but perhaps can't deliver. I just don't know.

Kangaroo495
03-07-2009, 16:41
Да, Я говорю мало и изучаю русский язык три месяца. My Russian is very basic and I'm just looking for the opportunities to practice.

I got "approved" to take the CELTA course at the BKC and I was slated to go in January. After reading all this info from the forums has made me a little gun-shy, although I am deadset on wanting to live in Russia. My best friend is moving to Colombia, but yet even though I know noone, I'd still rather do Russia.

Even with all the crap that is talked about with the McSchools..is this the best route for a newbie to go or knowing what you know now, would you have taken a different route?

I took the CELTA course a loooooong time ago when I first arrived in Russia. I found it moderately useful in terms of acquiring language teaching skills, but very useful when applying for jobs. I found a job immediately in an excellent language school called Sunny Plus at Aeroport, which offered very good pay, and a work permit. Additionally, I was teaching english to an oligarch on the side and getting an excellent rate! ($100/academic hour). However, I didn't keep teaching for long. I used my contacts/friends etc. to find other opportunities and managed to get a job as a recruitment consultant. After a year or so doing that, I got into real estate, and am now a Property Advisor in a big American company. That's the beauty of Russia - I left Australia as a waiter, and after 2 years became a mid-level, well paid businessman with no additional experience or education. I'm still in real-estate.

However, I'm not sure what the current situation would be like, as Russia is one of the hardest hit by the crisis.

Why did you decide to move now? It's terrible timing. I mean, really awful timing. Can you wait a year or so?

Jetsettermike22
03-07-2009, 17:57
Why now? I guess after I got out of the Navy, I did a little soul-searching about what I wanted to do with my life. Travel has always interested me, and I could've done that in the Navy, but I don't really like rules and office politics. I've grown tired of Milwaukee, so I wanted to make a drastic change. I've always wanted to live in another country for a year, and from the reasons I stated, I chose Russia. If the prospects of finding a job are horrible, then I guess I can wait a year. I don't really want to be stranded in a foreign culture with no job and knowing nobody. Then again, I really don't want to wait..I want to get going on my desire to live abroad. Maybe there's another country that could take me in and allow me to teach while I work on my degree (I am doing distance learning through the American Military University..and the government funds my studies and pays me using the G.I. Bill) I guess I can use this forum as a gauge on how the English teacher job market is going. I appreciate all the advice that has been given and if anyone has anything else, I would love to hear it.

bluemidnight
10-07-2009, 13:21
Hi -

I currently work for one of the McSchools. Started last year as an Intern and have signed on as a teacher again for next year. PM me for details if you want them. =)

Bels
11-07-2009, 12:31
In regards to the coming recession, I am not sure how it will affect the private teacher or tutor. I do believe that schools remain having rising costs and continue to be burdoned with red-tape especially in emloying native speaking teachers.

There will be no longer masses of EFL students coming from corporate companies needing to learn English, and that this was the main market that major EFL schools depended on.

For me as an independant EFL teacher? I've had my toughest Summer in five years, but now I'm beginning to get serious enquiries. My guess is that my only market will come from Oligarth individuals wanting for various reasons to learn English for such reasons as immigration or to progress in whatever international businesses they might be doing. There will also be a big market in children including teenagers.

I suggest we ask teachers how they are doing giving it a month after September. By then we will really know if the Russia has at last come to terms with a real recession.