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Jasonspear
09-06-2009, 07:30
Hi there I am a US citizen planning on going to Russia in the next few months and I will be marrying my Russian girlfriend when I am there! Does this help make me become a citizen of Russia? What would I have to do to become a permanent resident and work and raise a family in Moscow? What do I need to do? Need advice asap! Thank you for your help!

SV1973a
09-06-2009, 08:17
Hi Jason,

This is going to be disappointing to you, because there is no easy solution!

To answer your first question; your marriage helps you in getting a residence permit in that you are out of the quota system (but only after 3 years of marriage). For the whole of Moscow (over 10M inhabitants) the quota is set at 1500, and they are immediately taken up by the people from the former USSR countries.

First you have to get married. Probably easiest to do in Moscow, then you will already have the certificate of marriage in Russian language. When you get this marriage certificate, check how your name, place of birth, etc, are transcribed. It should be the same as on your passport.
If you have been married for 3 years to a Russian citizen, then you can apply for temporary residence permit. To get the TRP you will need to pass medical tests at specific Russian state clinics in the area of Moscow where you will be living. You also will need to collect lots of other documents. You fill in the application form (you probably need to correct this a few times), stand in line at the FMS office, wait for 6 months, go back to the FMS office and get the TRP stamp in your passport. This TRP does not give you the right to work in Moscow, though. If you want to work here, you will need to obtain a work permit (but this is a whole other story). With the TRP you need to obtain an exit visa each time you want to leave Russia. You can always leave of course, but if you do so, without having the exit visa, your TRP will be cancelled.
If you want to live in Russia, the 3 years before you can apply for the TRP, you need to get a proper visa. I do not know of any long term visas for spouses, so I suppose you need a tourist visa or a business visa, and will have to leave the country regularly to renew your visa.
After having lived one year with the TRP, you can apply for the permanent residence permit. About the same procedure as for the TRP, but you need to gather more documents. This PRP is valid as long as your US passport is valid, but not longer than 5 years. You need to renew this PRP every 5 years (the Russians apparently have another understanding of the word `permanent`). This PRP gives you the right to work, without needing to have a work permit.
After having lived with the PRP for one year, you can apply for Russian citizenship. You will need to renounce your US citizenship however.

Good luck to you!

Better send your girlfriend to FMS to check out your questions.

By the way, have you ever been to Russia ? Do you speak Russian ?

Firefox
09-06-2009, 10:01
The above description of procedure is very accurate and by the book.

However many agencies are known to by pass the quota waiting list etc = for a Fee.
However being married to a Russian can cut these Fees considerably.

SV1973a
09-06-2009, 10:08
Do you know any of these agencies ?
The figure I have in mind for such a fee is 10 kEUR (but I don`t remember where I have it from)! Don`t see why being married to a Russian should make any difference to these agencies, though.

tgma
09-06-2009, 19:36
I don't think anyone has yet found an agency that can speed up the process faster than 5 months. An agent should be able to organise your medical certificate for you, and should ensure that the forms are all properly submitted, and do the following up, but I've not heard of anyone accelerating the process. And you will still need to get the documents about your criminal record yourself.

I think that agents can be helpful if you are applying for a quota - i.e., if you are not married to a Russian.

But 10K Euro would be on the high end of the estimates that I've seen - I think this is what a Western law firm would charge. I think that local Russian agents would be more like USD 1500-2000 and (this is important) equally good, if not better.

Bels
09-06-2009, 19:57
First things first.
Get married
Get your police check.
Go to the local FMS with your and start the application process.
Get a good job, but hopefully you already have one, as it is going to get tough here.

SV1973a
09-06-2009, 20:05
That is what he should do, but he needs to be married for 3 years or more before he is eligible to apply for the TRP outside of the quota.

Bels
09-06-2009, 20:39
That is what he should do, but he needs to be married for 3 years or more before he is eligible to apply for the TRP outside of the quota.

Wrong. Apply immediately after marriage the same as I did, and many other members here did the same.

SV1973a
09-06-2009, 21:02
My mistake, Bels.

The 3 year term is a requirement when you apply for RF citizenship via the shortened procedure. For the TRP there is indeed no such requirement, so you can apply for TRP out of the quota immediately after marriage.
I must have been mixed up with my own application for TRP, intending to get RF citizenship afterwards. Would be great if I could skip the PRP step.

Jasonspear
10-06-2009, 02:23
Thank you everyone who replied and gave me advice! I needed it but does anyone know where I can get a criminal check done here in the USA? Do I just go to the police station or where do I go to? Lawyer? Court house? etc?

Firefox
10-06-2009, 10:01
Yes - I know of an agency who does exactly this - and handling my case at the moment (and many other successful cases that i know of). I have been in Russia just over 3 years and not married.I will receive my TRP in July.

As TGMA says :
Agents cannot speed up process
Agents cannot by pass requirment of police check.

However agents can:
Speed up Medical check process. Mine took 2-3 hours start to finish
Go around Quota system (this is where bulk of costs are incurred)
While on TRP = obtain Exit visa from Ovir on the same day.

As for costs =all agents are in business= Like all businesses =They will charge whatever is going ....and clients who need the service will be prepared to pay.

russiancitizen
13-06-2009, 06:56
How did you manage it - get it without marrige with russian?
Can you provide some details about "an agency who does exactly this "?
THat will be very helpful.hope you are still tracking this chat!
rc

Raul
13-06-2009, 12:58
I have been living in russia 2.5 years by work permit and work visa. Everytime it gets more and more complicated for my company and for me to get W.P. and VISA renewed.

Is there any way for me to stay and work in russia without all these paper work and long processes?

tgma
15-06-2009, 16:38
Raul you can do this, only the problem is, if you are not married to a Russia, there is a quota, which gets filled in very quickly. If you are willing to pay, then you can get an agent to ensure that you are part of the quota. Then you just apply for temporary residency like everyone else - you need a criminal record check, health certificate, etc.

snowbars
16-06-2009, 01:11
tgma is correct

Bels
16-06-2009, 12:22
Thank you everyone who replied and gave me advice! I needed it but does anyone know where I can get a criminal check done here in the USA? Do I just go to the police station or where do I go to? Lawyer? Court house? etc?

Make a search on this site as there is much information available on this forum about Americans getting criminal checks. And yes it does look rather complicated and confusing. So perhaps it's time for an experienced American who has been there done it recently to give simple and straightforward information on this subject.

I can certainly help on the British side on giving the specific web contacts. For Brits it is called Subject Access and that's how you should search, and when you receive your Subject Access document you must return it to the Ministry of Foreign affairs get it legalised or appostiled as some call it.

This is why you should deal with getting your criminal record check first, because it could take a long time for you to receive your legalised criminal check. In the meantime you should go to your nearest FCO office and start the long application process, such as visiting the various clinics for your medical checks. If you have a problem with the Russian language always go with your Russian spouse as he or she is your best unpaid agent.

Bels
16-06-2009, 13:05
Hi there I am a US citizen planning on going to Russia in the next few months and I will be marrying my Russian girlfriend when I am there! Does this help make me become a citizen of Russia? What would I have to do to become a permanent resident and work and raise a family in Moscow? What do I need to do? Need advice asap! Thank you for your help!

To answer your other questions. TPR is your first step to stay in the country. After one year you may then apply for ERR! Permanent Residency which lasts 5 years and then you may if you wish reapply for the same again. Or you may go for Russian Citizenship.

I hope I am right in speaking for many of us here, that most of us are reluctant to give up our British or North American passports to become a Russian citizen.

In regards to working in Russia. Hopefully you already have a good working contract as an expat employee, otherwise without it, even as a Russian spouse with children you are going to get kicked out of Russia every ninety days. (It would be nice to see if theTRP application procecess has been speeded up for completion guaranteed 60 days, as it would make life a lot easier for future applicants.)

If you don't speak Russian much, and can't find a job here with your qualifications then the easiest way in is to apply as an English teacher to an EFL school who can supply you with a work permit, which will allow you to stay in the country. Income as an employed teacher is very poor especially when you may well be married with children to care for, therefore you will have to find alternative ways to make real money.

Bels
18-06-2009, 16:38
For Americans try this search. I think this is the longest and most difficult process in regards to application of TRP.

http://www.expat.ru/forum/search.php?searchid=464294


So you should get on with this first, and while you are waiting go straight to your FMS for the application form and the list of clinics you have to visit.

bahemath
30-08-2009, 18:49
I got married here in Moscow in June. Will do my application for TPR soon. But in the 10 months that I'm in Moscow I already made some connections so things will go good

Bels
30-08-2009, 19:55
I got married here in Moscow in June. Will do my application for TPR soon. But in the 10 months that I'm in Moscow I already made some connections so things will go good

By connections do you you mean applying for your police check, getting it apostiled, and getting your application form from FMS. Perhaps going to the recommended clinics and getting the checkups? That's what you should be doing by now.

dwandsv
06-09-2009, 00:21
Hello Jasonspear -
The following is a post I made a few weeks ago, hope it helps.

The following is from a webpage regarding dual citizenship and is from the US State department's travel & citizenship pages, specifically citizenship_778.html publication.
ADMINISTRATIVE STANDARD OF EVIDENCE
As already noted, the actions listed above can cause loss of U.S. citizenship only if performed voluntarily and with the intention of relinquishing U.S. citizenship. The Department has a uniform administrative standard of evidence based on the premise that U.S. citizens intend to retain United States citizenship when they obtain naturalization in a foreign state, subscribe to a declaration of allegiance to a foreign state, serve in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or accept non-policy level employment with a foreign government.
DISPOSITION OF CASES WHEN ADMINISTRATIVE PREMISE IS APPLICABLE
In light of the administrative premise discussed above, a person who:
1. is naturalized in a foreign country;
2. takes a routine oath of allegiance to a foreign state;
3. serves in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or
4. accepts non-policy level employment with a foreign government,
And in so doing wishes to retain U.S. citizenship need not submit prior to the commission of a potentially expatriating act a statement or evidence of his or her intent to retain U.S. citizenship since such an intent will be presumed.
When, as the result of an individual's inquiry or an individual's application for registration or a passport it comes to the attention of a U.S. consular officer that a U.S. citizen has performed an act made potentially expatriating by Sections 349(a)(1), 349(a)(2), 349(a)(3) or 349(a)(4) as described above, the consular officer will simply ask the applicant if there was intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship when performing the act. If the answer is no, the consular officer will certify that it was not the person's intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship and, consequently, find that the person has retained U.S. citizenship.
As for me I fully intend on gaining Russian citizenship, whatever it takes.

dwandsv
06-09-2009, 00:23
Hi there I am a US citizen planning on going to Russia in the next few months and I will be marrying my Russian girlfriend when I am there! Does this help make me become a citizen of Russia? What would I have to do to become a permanent resident and work and raise a family in Moscow? What do I need to do? Need advice asap! Thank you for your help!
Hello Jasonspear -
The following is from a post I made a few weeks ago, hope it helps.

The following is from a webpage regarding dual citizenship and is from the US State department's travel & citizenship pages, specifically citizenship_778.html publication.
ADMINISTRATIVE STANDARD OF EVIDENCE
As already noted, the actions listed above can cause loss of U.S. citizenship only if performed voluntarily and with the intention of relinquishing U.S. citizenship. The Department has a uniform administrative standard of evidence based on the premise that U.S. citizens intend to retain United States citizenship when they obtain naturalization in a foreign state, subscribe to a declaration of allegiance to a foreign state, serve in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or accept non-policy level employment with a foreign government.
DISPOSITION OF CASES WHEN ADMINISTRATIVE PREMISE IS APPLICABLE
In light of the administrative premise discussed above, a person who:
1. is naturalized in a foreign country;
2. takes a routine oath of allegiance to a foreign state;
3. serves in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or
4. accepts non-policy level employment with a foreign government,
And in so doing wishes to retain U.S. citizenship need not submit prior to the commission of a potentially expatriating act a statement or evidence of his or her intent to retain U.S. citizenship since such an intent will be presumed.
When, as the result of an individual's inquiry or an individual's application for registration or a passport it comes to the attention of a U.S. consular officer that a U.S. citizen has performed an act made potentially expatriating by Sections 349(a)(1), 349(a)(2), 349(a)(3) or 349(a)(4) as described above, the consular officer will simply ask the applicant if there was intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship when performing the act. If the answer is no, the consular officer will certify that it was not the person's intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship and, consequently, find that the person has retained U.S. citizenship.
As for me I fully intend on gaining Russian citizenship, whatever it takes.

xSnoofovich
01-12-2009, 15:59
Is there any way for me to stay and work in russia without all these paper work and long processes?

Just throw away ur passport and stay away from the police !