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View Full Version : The grass is ALWAYS greener...



txmsk
21-05-2009, 01:33
Dear fellow teachers, if you care, I need your thoughts and perhaps some advice.

I am tired of working here: tired of the instability offered by the EFL schools whose balls are often held in a painful, lasting squeeze by their clients. What am I talking about - very simple - that the lessons 'will start on Friday... on next week.. in two weeks perhaps'. Give me a break.

I'm a bit fed up with little Napoleon/Hitler type managers who like to control everything and flatly refuse to take any sound, intelligent advice from Russian support staff (the backbone of any EFL school!) or teachers in general. A good example is Tom's House and the crazy witch woman who runs the school. Parlex is another example that has also been talked about quite a bit.

What else? Well, teachers get paid crap - even before the crisis - in addition to not getting things like real, paid holidays, decent accommodations or at least an accommodations supplement, or entirely free-of-charge Russian lessons.

Visas - they are always a problem; so many schools don't offer support, or they only offer partial support.

Language schools - let's be honest, this is a terminal career in Russia. There are no university teaching opportunities because either the rectors and deans eat up all the university funds, or the general opinion is that they just don't need native speakers. Why hire native speakers when you can have second class teachers instructing students in Russian/Soviet English?

To be fair, there are some good teachers out there who are non-native speakers, but having no exposure to natives during at least a university education is a tragedy.

I'm looking into Japan, Korea, and the Middle East. I want to develop as a teacher and have the opportunity to teach in either a university or college. But, I also want that extra support - accommodations, actual paid vacation/off time, and a good solid salary.

So, here are my questions/requests to you guys. Give me some reasons to stay here. Give me some reasons why I should leave. I don't expect that the next position I get will be 100 percent free of problems and be perfect, whether it be in or outside of Russia.

One last note. I don't want to leave in all honesty; it'd be a bit of a hassle and I'd have to leave lots of friends behind. Plus, I'd have to go through the trouble of selling lots of stuff and either taking or leaving pounds/kilos of books.

Thank you all in advance for your understanding. Watch out for the babushki....

Kraven Morehead
21-05-2009, 02:29
Korea just punt a bunch of illegal teachers about a couple years ago.

I heard good things about Thailand and China.

Bels
21-05-2009, 21:29
I have accepted you want to stay here. If you are not married here you will need a contract with the right school. There is no real immigration here, and you must depend on these greedy schools to employ you.
Unless of course you are married to a Russian citizen, and you start with a TRP. Because there is a recession coming, without knowing your nationality, I suggest you go home. You will be much better off there than here.


Dear fellow teachers, if you care, I need your thoughts and perhaps some advice.

I am tired of working here: tired of the instability offered by the EFL schools whose balls are often held in a painful, lasting squeeze by their clients. What am I talking about - very simple - that the lessons 'will start on Friday... on next week.. in two weeks perhaps'. Give me a break.

I'm a bit fed up with little Napoleon/Hitler type managers who like to control everything and flatly refuse to take any sound, intelligent advice from Russian support staff (the backbone of any EFL school!) or teachers in general. A good example is Tom's House and the crazy witch woman who runs the school. Parlex is another example that has also been talked about quite a bit.

What else? Well, teachers get paid crap - even before the crisis - in addition to not getting things like real, paid holidays, decent accommodations or at least an accommodations supplement, or entirely free-of-charge Russian lessons.

Visas - they are always a problem; so many schools don't offer support, or they only offer partial support.

Language schools - let's be honest, this is a terminal career in Russia. There are no university teaching opportunities because either the rectors and deans eat up all the university funds, or the general opinion is that they just don't need native speakers. Why hire native speakers when you can have second class teachers instructing students in Russian/Soviet English?

To be fair, there are some good teachers out there who are non-native speakers, but having no exposure to natives during at least a university education is a tragedy.

I'm looking into Japan, Korea, and the Middle East. I want to develop as a teacher and have the opportunity to teach in either a university or college. But, I also want that extra support - accommodations, actual paid vacation/off time, and a good solid salary.

So, here are my questions/requests to you guys. Give me some reasons to stay here. Give me some reasons why I should leave. I don't expect that the next position I get will be 100 percent free of problems and be perfect, whether it be in or outside of Russia.

One last note. I don't want to leave in all honesty; it'd be a bit of a hassle and I'd have to leave lots of friends behind. Plus, I'd have to go through the trouble of selling lots of stuff and either taking or leaving pounds/kilos of books.

Thank you all in advance for your understanding. Watch out for the babushki....