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Dreamcatcher
11-10-2004, 09:04
I've not been living in Russia for couple years and mostly get all news from Internet. The news which I get show me not a very perspective picture about future of Russia. The officials are trying to turn my motherland into USSR or some sort of autocratic country. :(

Now, I am interested in opinion of people who are living in Russia now, who sees everything by their eyes....

What do you think about current political processes coming in Russia now? What's going to happen in the nearest 5-7 years with Russia?

Col. Brokov
11-10-2004, 15:14
No short answers here!
I don't have the time to go into a long detailed report, but I'll start one for you. Russia is reverting to a controlled autocratic society. Democracy as a whole is not well regarded by the people, most of whom have an even worse view of politicians and the political process than Americans. Putin himself is slowly pulling more and more power into his own hands. He is slowly becoming a dictator. This I don't think is too terrible a thing as Putin does seem to have Russia's best interests in mind; the only problem is that he seems to think that he is the only one who can solve the situation. To compound the problem, he may be right in this as everybody else is more concerned with their own power and wealth. I doubt that any of this is new to you though.

Filimon
11-10-2004, 19:41
Originally posted by Col. Brokov
No short answers here!
I don't have the time to go into a long detailed report, but I'll start one for you. Russia is reverting to a controlled autocratic society. Democracy as a whole is not well regarded by the people, most of whom have an even worse view of politicians and the political process than Americans. Putin himself is slowly pulling more and more power into his own hands. He is slowly becoming a dictator. This I don't think is too terrible a thing as Putin does seem to have Russia's best interests in mind; the only problem is that he seems to think that he is the only one who can solve the situation. To compound the problem, he may be right in this as everybody else is more concerned with their own power and wealth. I doubt that any of this is new to you though.

The main problem here is that Putin is not immortal. If he leaves the legacy of centralised power to a moron of the likes of Zhrinoskiy or (even worse) Gryzlov and such - God help Russia! He either needs to stay in power for as long as he lives or make sure no president after him gets the same political weight. Otherwise Russia is done for.

Ghost
11-10-2004, 19:44
Agree with all said points. Would also add that regardless of whether or not he has Russia's best interest at heart, and even if he were immortal, it would take 100s of years to fix everything with one man doing all the work. Eventually others have to be trusted to handle issues, and problems must be delegated.

Jet
11-10-2004, 19:48
Fil, the problem is not Putin's immortality (or mortality) the problem is that he doesn't have the clue as to what to do. His economic policy is weak and lacking vision, the law enforcement is trailing far behind he consolidation of power process. Since 1999 he fights Chechen rebels - the ticket he has been voted into the office - with no results what-so-ever. He is lucky the prices on oil are high, otherwise the country would be in big trouble.

kniga
11-10-2004, 21:12
The Western press does not have a clue about Russia. The West, and especially Americans, want and expect Russian to embrace and practice American style democracy. This is not hubris so much as absolute ignorance of Russian history, culture and peoples. A thousand years ago Russians couldn't handle their own squabbles so they asked a strong Viking prince to rule over them and Dolgoruki became the first notable dictator of the Russian people. Nothing has changed in a thousand years and the Russian people are long used to having a strong man in charge. Putin is merely today's new czar and probably not a bad one. George bush creates Homeland Security and curtails a great deal of American civil rights and is called a hero. Vladimir Putin does the same thing by re-centralizing power and is called a backsliding (from a democracy that only exists in the uninformed minds of Western pundits) dictator. Russia today has more enemies from within than from without, but until the last communists die off (happening pretty rapidly now) and corruption at all levels is reduced (probably never going to happen) it will be difficult for Russia to make progress in this Brave New World. But, if you mind your business, pay your taxes, stay away from dodgy business practices, pay your taxes and generally keep your nose clean, you can live a pretty normal life in Russia, at least in the major cities.

Moscow Wolf
11-10-2004, 21:47
Bookman, as long as I don't have to pay 'taxes' twice as you've repeated in your post, I might just buy that. What are taxes anyway!

kniga
12-10-2004, 08:59
Wolfie,

I must be subconsciously paranoid about taxes since I have been viciously attacked by the remnants of the Nazi Gestapo which today are alive and well and lurking in the U.S. under the name of the Infernal Revenue Service.

Dreamcatcher
12-10-2004, 09:06
I do appreciate your, guys, opinion which I do needed to know. Not just for flame, but to form more realistic picture about my motherland.

Pooty Poot
12-10-2004, 10:01
Originally posted by Filimon
The main problem here is that Putin is not immortal. If he leaves the legacy of centralised power to a moron of the likes of Zhrinoskiy or (even worse) Gryzlov and such - God help Russia!

I ain't goin' nowhere, hoss.

Click here to read why (http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040920-095751-1737r.htm)

ChinChilla
13-10-2004, 17:23
Putin's problem is he's too soft. He talks the talk but never walks the walk. If he shot a few chinovniki one might be able to respect him as a budding dictator. Instead he's just chief bureaucrat in a bureaucratic system going nowhere.

IRS_Runner
13-10-2004, 21:08
Originally posted by kniga
Wolfie,

I must be subconsciously paranoid about taxes since I have been viciously attacked by the remnants of the Nazi Gestapo which today are alive and well and lurking in the U.S. under the name of the Infernal Revenue Service. Running from the IRS, eh? :D

kniga
13-10-2004, 23:17
IRS_Runner,

No had a run in with the IRS. Your moniker sounds like you have, too.

Moscow Wolf
14-10-2004, 05:02
Yeah, I might have to sell a Merc or two, close a few offshore accounts and reduce my gold watch and suit count a bit, but what the hell, that's life, you win some and you win some! lol.

quincy
15-10-2004, 02:02
On Putin's supposed slide to authoritarianism every edition of the Moscow Times appears to have at least two articles attacking him but I don't see anyone in the English language press (in Russia or abroad) giving him credit for at least trying to fix some of the problems. His crackdown on the oligarchs has actually been popular with the majority of Russians

crom
15-10-2004, 11:46
Stalin was also popular and who do you refer to as the majority

gadfly
16-10-2004, 20:37
Originally posted by Dreamcatcher
What do you think about current political processes coming in Russia now? What's going to happen in the nearest 5-7 years with Russia?


Mu-Mu will get Wi-Fi.

Ned Kelly
17-10-2004, 03:27
Originally posted by quincy
On Putin's supposed slide to authoritarianism every edition of the Moscow Times appears to have at least two articles attacking him but I don't see anyone in the English language press (in Russia or abroad) giving him credit for at least trying to fix some of the problems. His crackdown on the oligarchs has actually been popular with the majority of Russians

usual crud, quincy.

there was no oligarch crackdown.

are alekperov or potanin or abramovich or any of these other arseholes having problems? no.

he's fixed nothing.

do you see any improvement in the army? (to me the ultimate litmus test as the country's defence is a basic priority for a president.) no. the draft is still a ****ing murderous disaster. senior officers are as corrupt as shit. putin promised repeatedly to reform the military but did nothing, he always bows to corrupt state interests.

do you see better security services? no. they're too busy trying to get hold of oil companies or extracting money from businesses to look after national security. don't hold your breath for putin to do anything there either.

he introduced some reforms, which have been well received by his bureaucrat mates that run russia.

but do you think it's fair for billionaires to pay 13% income tax, the same as a metro driver?

or abolish free transport and other perks for veterans and pensioners. don't you think money might be better saved sacking some of the millions of bureaucrats? i do, but again it won't happen.

i'm sure your hero john pilger would cheer these sorts of liberal reforms.

you really are full of it.

Utka
17-10-2004, 11:23
And the trains run on time, so all is well in the motherland, right? I think the danger here is that unless your daily life is affected, you tend to ignore the "big picture" being painted by the restriction of democratic reforms. And when you are more interested in feeding your family and living, representative government versus autocracy is not high on your list of priorities.

Frankly I am suprised we havn't seen significant changes to the quality of military life in Russia. Short of an army massed at the Polish (or perhaps Mongolian) border, I don't see the Russian forces spray painting "For Putin, For Russia" on the tanks anytime soon. And as far as internal security, a lot of money and talk will be thrown at the terrorism problem, but little will actually be done to make things safer. Same thing happened in the US after 9/11, the hijackers smuggle box cutters into the cabin, so the government starts x-raying all CHECKED baggage to increase security. Not only did they slam the barn door after the horse escaped, they slammed the door of the wrong barn. Meanwhile, people got all upset about the fact that an x-ray system that would scan passengers for weapons on their person might be too intrusive. Here it's a low-budget political version; to stop Chechen terrorists from blowing up planes and killing schoolchildren, we'll centralize the government and name someone the Chechniya Tsar to study the problem.

Well, at least the trains are running on time.

quincy
17-10-2004, 22:25
Originally posted by Ned Kelly
do you see any improvement in the army? (to me the ultimate litmus test as the country's defence is a basic priority for a president.) no. the draft is still a ****ing murderous disaster. senior officers are as corrupt as shit. putin promised repeatedly to reform the military but did nothing, he always bows to corrupt state interests.

do you see better security services? no. they're too busy trying to get hold of oil companies or extracting money from businesses to look after national security. don't hold your breath for putin to do anything there either.

he introduced some reforms, which have been well received by his bureaucrat mates that run russia.

but do you think it's fair for billionaires to pay 13% income tax, the same as a metro driver?

or abolish free transport and other perks for veterans and pensioners. don't you think money might be better saved sacking some of the millions of bureaucrats? i do, but again it won't happen.



That's a good improvement from your usual one-liners! I can be persuaded to become a Putin critic too you know!I never understood his cutbacks on pensioners' benefits

Ned Kelly
18-10-2004, 05:38
an improvement is good by nature.

it shits me reading people from the leftist brigade like you who are forever apologising for putin.

Pooty Poot
18-10-2004, 10:48
For ****'s sake, Ned, I happen to enjoy it !

Quincy, you can continue to kiss my ass if you want.

quincy
18-10-2004, 13:20
Originally posted by Ned Kelly
an improvement is good by nature.

it shits me reading people from the leftist brigade like you who are forever apologising for putin.

You are mistaken! The "liftist brigade" is also anti-Putin. That includes your anti-hero Pilger