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BelindaG
21-01-2009, 16:49
Hi
Assuming your native tongue is english, and you reside in Moscow, how do you go about getting any qualifications to teach English? And, what could one expect to make a month? Generally what hours are involved? And do most of you teach one on one or to a group?
Just interested.
thanks

CarribeanDreams
22-01-2009, 17:28
Belinda,
I'm not sure about getting qualifications to be able to work in some educational center but I guess one of the options might be the so-called "english-via-phone" classes.
If you are interested, I could give you the contacts for the company that we are using for our employees. As far as I know, most of their teachers are people from various backgrounds and do it just as a side work, and most likely that company does some kind of training for those wishing to work for them.

alterego
23-01-2009, 06:25
Belinda
getting a 'qualification' is not all that it is cracked up to be. I've seen people with 'qualifications' that cannnot teach. Also here in Russia I have rarely been asked if I have 'qualifications' and I have never been asked to produce the certificates.
That said, if you want a certificate there are plenty of online courses where you can get a TEFL certificate. The bigger English schools here usually offer this course also. I think they do it not only as a source of income but also as a source of new teachers.
There are many schools that will hire you just becasue you are a native speaker.
If you haven't taught before I think you will be surprised that it isn't as easy as you think. You will know the correct way to speak but you won't be able to explain why. It also takes some experience to prepare even a simple lesson. And even more experience just to know what lesson to prepare.
You might start off by offering English conversation. While you are doing this start reading a text book on English grammar. After you've read that try teaching an intermediate level student.

Good Luck

Green Tea
25-01-2009, 18:31
The International House chain of schools offer a course a Moscow.

BKC-IH Teacher Training Center (http://www.bkcih-moscow.com/training/)


No first hand info here, but looks decent.

alekto
26-01-2009, 05:55
Generally, if you have a qualification, you have a better chance of getting a job with better pay. No qualification and you are more at the mercy of the school, more likely to be offered less money and potentially worse classes.

From what I know (I may be a little out of date, as I haven't been in the EFL loop for a while), Language Link and BKC-IH are the most reputable schools to go to. The former does a language exchange course, which means, from what I am aware, that they are prepared to take on unqualified teachers and train them on the job. I have heard that BKC do the same, but I never met such a teacher myself even when I was there.

Both offer one-month intensive CELTA courses, which would provide you with the basic, internationally recognised certificate enabling you to teach English as a foreign language. I'd highly recommend it, if only to give yourself an idea of what you are in for.

Of course, the real money spinner is private teaching. However, the rates you'll be able to charge with no experience/no qualification won't get you far. Reputation is all - the best way to get private students is to work for a school and win over pupils from your classes. Eventually, you'll have plenty to get you by and an increasing reputation doing the rounds by word of mouth.

If you're a good teacher, of course :)

Good luck!

fishtail
08-02-2009, 17:50
By far the best of the various courses around is the Cambridge CELTA course (which in Moscow is offered by BKC). No course can instantly turn you into a good teacher - but if you have the potential, CELTA will give you a very good basis on which to build.

quincy
09-02-2009, 23:01
Unfortunately many foreign students don't like the CELTA approach which opposes 'teacher-centred' traditional teaching.

To many students this simply seems an attempt to make life easier for teachers and shift responsibility to the students. Many students incidentally complain that CELTA-trained native teachers know little or nothing about English grammar

CELTA does encourage conversation which is probably one positive point about their methodology.

CELTA and International House don't seem interested in addressing foreign students' concerns.

Bels
23-02-2009, 00:54
Unfortunately many foreign students don't like the CELTA approach which opposes 'teacher-centred' traditional teaching.

To many students this simply seems an attempt to make life easier for teachers and shift responsibility to the students. Many students incidentally complain that CELTA-trained native teachers know little or nothing about English grammar

CELTA does encourage conversation which is probably one positive point about their methodology.

CELTA and International House don't seem interested in addressing foreign students' concerns.

I am in no way a supporter of CELTA being the one and only internatianallyrecognised course, in fact it is over priced and inconvenient for many potential students.

However, that is not to say that native qualified teachers such as CELTA qualified are not familure in teaching grammar and everything else , as yes they are well equipped for this and everything else. This is simply jealosy statements from Russian English teachers who can't compete with the demands for native speaking teachers who do their job with greater results. And the Rusian student recognise this by demanding native speaking teachers.

What are the foreign student concerns? Overpriced? What kind of income do you think a good teacher deserves to live in Russia? Yes! exactly the same income as you are trying to get in learning English. Unfortunately the employed teacher doesn't get that, as the school gets the benifit of their skills instead. Have you met an employed teacher that is wealthy? Are they driving a new BMW alongside their country house? They are lucky to have a washing machine in a shared crappy flat. And use the bus like everyone else

kapione
23-02-2009, 11:05
Bels you are 100% correct ! Recently potential students think they should have a Native speaking teacher for less than a Russian teacher charges for lessons.
In the past few weeks I have had a rash of students thinking this, partly due to desperate junior teachers and newbie teachers here not knowing the market prices.

Time is money, many students do not understand this fact , when they do to work they get paid, when they take off work due to sickness they get paid , when they go on holiday they get paid.....

Fact is independent teacher do NOT get this luxury of sick pay.
Fact Most Native speaking teachers RENT flats , and yes due to blatant greed flats are very over priced !
Fact we need to eat, food and essentials are very expensive, me and other long term expat teachers here in Moscow know of lower priced markets.
Fact with inflation and the devalued rubles and rising prices OUR lesson prices at 1200py to 1500py per academic hour is reasonable!
Potential students need to wake up to the fact that English lessons do cost money, but it is an investment in themselves .When you learn English, you open the door for more opportunities for you, your family your future
Donít cheat you self by nickel and diming yourselves
A Russian English language teacher can live in an English speaking country for 10 years and never get to our level of English......
Fact we must deal with constantly changing laws and regulations, Visas and other documentation.
I know I donít own a flat yet, I do not have a car here, yet, and yes I want good thing for my family...but I do the best for my students.... proof of this is called referrals.
a note to newbie teacher , stop being desperate and accepting low salaries , get a backbone , if you are so desperate ask us teachers who are here longterm for guidance .Accepting lower rates for lessons lowers EVERYONES value as a teacher

dontcallme
23-02-2009, 18:48
I'm also a new teacher. You won't need any real qualifications but the more clued-up you are the better. Read through grammar books and pay close attention to basic grammar as you need to be able to explain the terms in the best possible way.

I work for a company that has a huge mix of native teachers and Russians. Some students really enjoy lessons with native teachers as it's a great opportunity to practice speaking and listening and a way to speak more naturally.

Some students prefer the Russian teachers as they can explain grammar better (usually) and can explain things in Russian if the students really don't understand.

Marina Sukhotskaya
24-02-2009, 12:06
My view is that the teacher should be enthusiastic about the lessons they're giving. I prefer the one that is actually getting prepared for the cl**** has the materials required and in case the student has a speciafic problem with something (certain sounds or Grammar issues), looks for ways to resolve it. I'm not sure I would stay with the one who has all the required qualifications but has no real interest in my progress.

dontcallme
24-02-2009, 13:15
Exactly. You have to be a people person to be a teacher, to care about your students progression and do whatever is necessary for them to improve. Some people have great qualifications but this doesn't necessarily mean they can teach.


My view is that the teacher should be enthusiastic about the lessons they're giving. I prefer the one that is actually getting prepared for the cl**** has the materials required and in case the student has a speciafic problem with something (certain sounds or Grammar issues), looks for ways to resolve it. I'm not sure I would stay with the one who has all the required qualifications but has no real interest in my progress.

Jobler
24-02-2009, 21:32
Bels you are 100% correct ! Recently potential students think they should have a Native speaking teacher for less than a Russian teacher charges for lessons.
In the past few weeks I have had a rash of students thinking this, partly due to desperate junior teachers and newbie teachers here not knowing the market prices.

Time is money, many students do not understand this fact , when they do to work they get paid, when they take off work due to sickness they get paid , when they go on holiday they get paid.....

Fact is independent teacher do NOT get this luxury of sick pay.
Fact Most Native speaking teachers RENT flats , and yes due to blatant greed flats are very over priced !
Fact we need to eat, food and essentials are very expensive, me and other long term expat teachers here in Moscow know of lower priced markets.
Fact with inflation and the devalued rubles and rising prices OUR lesson prices at 1200py to 1500py per academic hour is reasonable!
Potential students need to wake up to the fact that English lessons do cost money, but it is an investment in themselves .When you learn English, you open the door for more opportunities for you, your family your future
Donít cheat you self by nickel and diming yourselves
A Russian English language teacher can live in an English speaking country for 10 years and never get to our level of English......
Fact we must deal with constantly changing laws and regulations, Visas and other documentation.
I know I donít own a flat yet, I do not have a car here, yet, and yes I want good thing for my family...but I do the best for my students.... proof of this is called referrals.
a note to newbie teacher , stop being desperate and accepting low salaries , get a backbone , if you are so desperate ask us teachers who are here longterm for guidance .Accepting lower rates for lessons lowers EVERYONES value as a teacher
:10806:
Excellent post and valuable information. Thanks

Bels
25-02-2009, 21:40
A very good debate has been created by the thead writer.

Let's start with the TEFL qualifications that are internationally accepted. On the top of my head from The British coouncil specifications you need at least 120 hours of study in TEFL, most of it will be in theory and something like 20 hours in observed practical teaching practice. That is the absolute minimum.

For one month face to face crash courses that covers these specifications I know of only two, and that is CELTA and Trinity. But it means you must work hard in studying for that full month, and there will be no time for working on the side. The cost of such courses will be approximately £1,000 plus cost of accommadation. And of course travel costs depending where you intend to study.

If for any reason you can't afford the break of one month fulltime course, there are of course the partime evening courses. The adavantage would be that you could continue working and study for the course. The disadvantage is that the course will take longer, let's say six months or more.

Another alternative is distance learning, but be careful as there is a lot of garbage around. I would look for at least the value of 160 hours of study, plus the provision of going to a school or college in a convenient area to be assessed as a teacher in practice for at least one week or 30 hours. You must also ensure that the particular school you are studying from is accredited by an association that is recognised. Watch it though! All advertisers who affers TEFL are accredited by something! WAtch out!

I can only find a few decent courses out of the thousands available. So yes you can write your own TEFL certificate or ask a friend, as it simply means TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Or TESOL is TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE!

I will try to find that link from the British Council of their specifications in what is required in a TEFL qualification. You now cannot work in UK without a course specified by the British. But you can work all over the world with a TEFL which have been 12 hours of study or less, and not approved by any recognised association.

Bels
25-02-2009, 21:55
Just for starters here is one useful link. What is TEFL, TESL, and TESOL. It continues to be a little argumentative but here is The British councils view.

TEFL or TESOL? - TEFL qualifications - Teacher Recruitment - British Council (http://www.britishcouncil.org/teacherrecruitment-tefl-qualifications-tefl-or-tesol.htm)

Bels
25-02-2009, 22:26
Boy oh Boy!. The Brish Council arte hypocrites! First of all they state that they don't accredit any school! Yet they accredit Trinity or CELTA in other areas. THis must stop and is old fashioned! I just wonder how the Americans think with their qualifications in TESOL. Is a HOOVER really a vacuam cleaner these day! Nor is CELTA or Trinity these days! STOP IT! YOU ARE BRAINWASHING FOOLISH EMPLOYERS!!! Teachers want to be qualified toth eir own convenience in modern times. And some can't afford the time of a fulltime month and spending a thousand pounds plus travel and accomadation for such a course. Such crash courses are ill advised to those learning English as a second language, and so the same it is for for CELTA and Trinity.

There is a very strong argument on whether you can study online or in a classroom with TEFL. The major argument appears to be that you need paractical teaching practice in a classroom envioronment. Yes that is true, and the minimum requirements are bout 24 hours of practical assessment for CELTA or Trinity. Am I right. So what is wrong with studying all the theory first with a reputable course and then proceding with a week in practical assessed teaching within a school?

Yes! it's all to do what suits the individual teacher in studying today. And yes I am disgusted how the British council states in one section of their website that they don't accredit anybody, yet on another part of their their site they are recommending CELTA and Trinity!!! It's not on! And should not be done> Hypocrites!!

Bels
25-02-2009, 22:48
This is a course |recommend to those who do cannot study in a nearby college and don't have the time for a fulltime one months course and also can't afford their ridiculous fees. It exceeds the British Council's specifications of hours of study required. accreditation, etc.

Tell me what you think, please.
]
Distance learning online TESOL course/TEFL course - with ESOL Skills for Life (http://www.intesolinternational.com/cert-ES-TESOL_business_teyl.shtml)

There are a few few others, but I must admit admit there are a lot of TEFL courses that are worthless for countries such as the UK, Canada, Australia, and USA. Yes you can qualify in many countries with any TEFL certificate. Why not just write your own. Why's that? Because they are lucky enough just to have a native English speaker in their country. So a $100 certificate worth a few hours study will do. Why not as it is a TEFL certificate isn't it :) And that's what they are advertising for :)

Jobler
03-03-2009, 21:49
Hi Bels

If an unsuspecting 'victim' studied with this lot they could end up working at their partner school in Moscow-take a bow English First. Not really a good idea. Yes I understand that the cost of the course and the quality are important. And I agree with your comments on the British Council.

But English First? Not even on my worst enemy.

Regards

Jobler

svfialkina
10-03-2009, 17:29
If I had one five-thousand-ruble note for every Russian teacher of English who thinks that because he or she can explain something in Russian that the student will learn faster or better than through teaching of a native speaker, oy, I could finally take that long vacation to Thailand. Truly, there is reason for native speaker teachers being able to teach better, and that is simply they are NATIVE SPEAKERS. I lived in the US for some years but I know my English is not as that of a native speaking teacher. ***Fellow Russians***: ask yourself one question: if you were foreign and wanted to learn Russian, who would you go to, a foreigner or a Russian? English is no different.

Granted there are good and bad teachers on both sides of a fence, but let's put the idea of "explaining English by using Russian" to sleep right away, because it never works for lasting results; rather it puts the mind to sleep with easy answers and doesn't encourage true learning of English. I know, because I tried this path long ago, and it was the waste of money.

CarolMontagna
10-04-2009, 15:30
Wow, this discussion is very interesting. I think all of you teachers are right, teaching well is very hard.

But besides all that, I couldn't understand if there is any reasonable teacher training course in Moscow. Do you recommend any or are them all waste of time? The thing is, I'm neither an english native speaker, nor russian. I'm brazilian. But i'd like to believe I speak english rather well, and I was always interested in teaching it.

I've been living in Moscow for a few months and won't stay much longer. But since I came with my husband and I'm not working here, I thought of using my time to start studying to become a teacher. That's why I'd like a recommendation.

Overall, is there a decent teacher training program in Moscow?

Thanks a lot! :-)

Bels
10-04-2009, 15:55
Try this one. The only recommended in Russia is CELTA

BKC-IH || Cambridge CELTA / DELTA courses in Russia, Moscow: Teacher Training Center in Moscow, Russia (http://www.bkcih-moscow.com/training/celta.html)

alterego
10-04-2009, 18:02
Wow, this discussion is very interesting. I think all of you teachers are right, teaching well is very hard.

But besides all that, I couldn't understand if there is any reasonable teacher training course in Moscow. Do you recommend any or are them all waste of time? The thing is, I'm neither an english native speaker, nor russian. I'm brazilian. But i'd like to believe I speak english rather well, and I was always interested in teaching it.

I've been living in Moscow for a few months and won't stay much longer. But since I came with my husband and I'm not working here, I thought of using my time to start studying to become a teacher. That's why I'd like a recommendation.

Overall, is there a decent teacher training program in Moscow?

Thanks a lot! :-)

I'd consider taking on a protťgť.

Bels
10-04-2009, 18:04
There are also a few good distance courses if you find it inconvenient to do a fulltime months course. An online course should meet the specifications of The British Council and here is one of the few that I would recommend.

Distance learning online TESOL course/TEFL course - with ESOL Skills for Life (http://www.intesolinternational.com/cert-ES-TESOL_business_teyl.shtml)

The advantage of this course is that you can take it in your home, at your own pace, and you can start as and when you wish. For it to meet the specifications required by the British you must at some stage go to a language school to teach in real classes for about a week, and be examined and observed by a suitably qualified EFL teacher. Full details are available from the above link.

I think this is a great course, because it not only covers teaching adults English, but also covers the specialist areas of teaching children and business English.

Of course if you are not a native English person, your English must be of at least advanced level. An 8 in IELTS would be acceptable for example. Or a CAE.

For a distance course, it's not cheap but it does cover about 160 hours study.