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Len Ganley Stance
11-11-2008, 09:03
Today marks the 90th Anniversary of the end of the Great War.............

In Flanders Fields
by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,
though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

MissAnnElk
11-11-2008, 09:09
What is the appropriate way to acknowledge this day . . . from us Yanks to you, that is? What do we say to you? What do you say to each other? Isn't there a moment of silence at 11:11?

This holiday always sort of sneaks up on me, and I feel as though I have loudly and laughingly crashed into a room during a very somber and serious moment. Educate me, please.

Gypsy
11-11-2008, 09:33
Some Kipling from Epitaphs of War:

1
We giving all gained all.
Neither lament us nor praise.
Only in all things recall,
It is fear, not death that slays.

2
From little towns in a far land we came,
To save our honour and a world aflame.
By little towns in a far land we sleep;
And trust that world we won for you to keep.

and most appropriate at the moment:

I could not dig: I dared not rob:
Therefore I lied to please the mob.
Now all my lies are proved untrue
And I must face the men I slew.
What tale shall serve me here among
Mine angry and defrauded young?

Len Ganley Stance
11-11-2008, 09:35
My personal choice is to take a silent moment to reflect on the fallen not only from the Great War but from all Wars.

There's an interesting article on Wiki about the last survivors from the Great War - there's only 10 'verified' survivors, 2 'unverified' survivors and 3 survivors who signed up after the Armistice date but before the Treaty of Versailles was signed. The oldest 'verified' survivor is Henry Allingham who is 112 years old.


You can read about it here -
List of surviving veterans of World War I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surviving_veterans_of_World_War_I#Verified_veterans_of_the_First_World_War.E2.80.9410_veterans)

Gypsy
11-11-2008, 09:41
The official 2 minute's silence is at 11am on the nearest sunday to the 11th;but like Len I take a minute on the 11th itself.

It is difficult to forget in Britain with Poppies on sale for 2 weeks before and coverage on TV and Radio of the Rememberance Services and laying of wreaths at the Cenotaph.

MissAnnElk
11-11-2008, 10:02
The official 2 minute's silence is at 11am on the nearest sunday to the 11th;but like Len I take a minute on the 11th itself.

It is difficult to forget in Britain with Poppies on sale for 2 weeks before and coverage on TV and Radio of the Rememberance Services and laying of wreaths at the Cenotaph.

Well, it was only when I found myself abroad and in the midst of Brits that I even realized the day existed. I don't think we do as much for Veteran's Day, and Memorial Day is all about backyard barbecues to most of us.

Gypsy
11-11-2008, 10:38
Well, it was only when I found myself abroad and in the midst of Brits that I even realized the day existed. I don't think we do as much for Veteran's Day, and Memorial Day is all about backyard barbecues to most of us.
If you start to look at the numbers of men killed particularly in WW1 it takes your breath away. And then you add in the utter futility of it, the sheer stupidity and ignorance of the Generals like Haig who could happily consign 100,000 men to die in one morning to gain no ground at all,not a single yard;it becomes very difficult to forget.

Maybe that is why 1m people protested on the streets in London against the Iraq Folly; and America seemed so gung-ho about the war. I don't know.

MissAnnElk
11-11-2008, 10:43
If you start to look at the numbers of men killed particularly in WW1 it takes your breath away. And then you add in the utter futility of it, the sheer stupidity and ignorance of the Generals like Haig who could happily consign 100,000 men to die in one morning to gain no ground at all,not a single yard;it becomes very difficult to forget.

Maybe that is why 1m people protested on the streets in London against the Iraq Folly; and America seemed so gung-ho about the war. I don't know.

Well, 9 million+ is staggering.

While we lost soldiers and made sacrifices in both World Wars, other than Pearl Harbor, it wasn't in our yard. It was "Over There," as the song said. It's just different.

Scrat335
11-11-2008, 10:53
Admittedly I give little thought to this, I don't think most people do. I will tonight though.

mosaikmum
11-11-2008, 12:38
[QUOTE=MissAnnElk;461600]What is the appropriate way to acknowledge this day . . . from us Yanks to you, that is? What do we say to you? What do you say to each other? Isn't there a moment of silence at 11:11?
QUOTE]
In Australia, we don't 'say' anything to one another to acknowledge the day. How much or little we do to remember the day is a personal thing. We stop for a minutes silence at 11am....to reflect and remember the fallen.

I was at work today and hadn't thought about it until.... at 11am as I was working and chatting to a colleague, I heard the bugle playing 'the last post' on the radio and then there was a minutes silence.....(my colleague is not an aussie) I said to her "Its Remembrance Day", then stopped talking and went on with my work in silence and gave a few moments thought.

Judge
11-11-2008, 15:11
YouTube- In Flanders Fields - Lest We Forget

Wodin
11-11-2008, 18:58
What is the appropriate way to acknowledge this day . . . from us Yanks to you, that is? What do we say to you? What do you say to each other? Isn't there a moment of silence at 11:11?

This holiday always sort of sneaks up on me, and I feel as though I have loudly and laughingly crashed into a room during a very somber and serious moment. Educate me, please.

There is nothing to say. Just stop for a minute, or a second if you can't spare a minute, and spare a thought for, and give thanks to, all those millions for their sacrifice.

To us it's not a holiday. It's a day of remembrance...as it says on the tin.

At 11am this morning I reminded my staff, as I have done every year for the past 3 years, that I'm odd, and simply stopped and stared for a minute.