PDA

View Full Version : What is this?



Willy
18-10-2008, 10:12
What is this?


No it's not just a dirty hand holding a rock.


http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm30/drumphotodump/IMG_9546.jpg

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm30/drumphotodump/IMG_9547.jpg

MissAnnElk
18-10-2008, 15:15
A fossilized dinosaur tooth? :eh::eh::eh:

Transparent Theatre
18-10-2008, 15:49
a dried cucumber?

w.meijerink
18-10-2008, 16:07
A tool they use 1000000 years ago to make fire?

:watching: Don't tell me there are s*xshops in that time too! :groan:

Albertina
18-10-2008, 16:32
This is what happens when people have too much time on their hands

Matt24
18-10-2008, 16:35
not enough fibre

Sidney Bliss
18-10-2008, 16:51
Fred Flintstone's remote control.

is4fun
18-10-2008, 20:24
A fossilized cucumber? or was there a typo on rock? c

Willy
18-10-2008, 22:24
Very good answers!


I found this one day while skipping cl**** I was 15 years old and I just kept it.
I didn't know what it was until about 10 years after I found it.

Then a condo complex was being built at the same place and what did they find?

The oldest intact Native American village. They think it was 800 years old.

This village was in Plymouth Ma. Yes turkey and cranberry sauce.
What had happen was English had come years before the Pilgrims and brought with them the flu. It killed everyone in the village and very quickly. Everything was just drop and laid as it would have been in their daily life. That's what made this such an important site. It gave a perfect picture of how Native Americans lived before Europeans came.

Once the developer found bones and clay pots they were to close the site and would begin a dig. Unfortunately nobody told the bulldozer operator and he went on Sunday ( a day that it's forbidden to work on in Massachusetts) and bulldozed the whole place.

After that the site was of little use, he disturbed everything making it worthless. All he said was "sorry I didn't know" Yeah right, they forgot it and built the condos. They were never charge.

When the Pilgrims showed up they found fields all ready to sow but nobody around for miles. One reason why Plymouth is where it is. Nobody knew why until the 1980's when they found this village.

So what is that?

It was used for mashing corn or nuts and past down from mother to daughter for 800 years. It fits perfectly in your hand and how it's worn could only be from hundreds of years of use. So my guess is, it's about 1200 years old.

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm30/drumphotodump/IMG_9542.jpg

Willy
19-10-2008, 14:22
I'll tell you about one more find.


In Plymouth there was a lot of old houses and I was working for a real estate developer, we were turning some old houses into condos.

In one house very close to the ocean (about 10 meters from) we were puzzled by the foundation. The cellar was smaller than the house, it was made of rocks with mortar,(it was more than 200 years old) but on the outside you could see that the old foundation was bigger and supported the whole house. We were trying to seal the foundation to keep water out and patching up the old mortar. On this one section it didn't seem to need any sealer, the water was not coming through, but as one of the guys was patching the mortar he found that behind it was hollow. We broke out the mortar and and pulled a rock out. Then we found out why things didn't make sense. There was another room behind this wall and in this room we found some very old shoes, some forks and knives and metal plates and cups.


Why would a house have a hidden room?

It was to hide run away slaves, you see the house was very close to the ocean and the slaves would wait here for a ship to bring them to Maine. They would bring them out at night and put them on ships sitting in the bay just before they left.

Pretty freaky looking in there and finding that stuff.

Benedikt
19-10-2008, 20:50
being a chef 2 things come to my mind, because the stone is rather smooth on the side and the brown 'spots' could be from iron.. maybe it was a stone to be used as a sharpening for tools like knives and the like.
on the other hand, while the end is not smooth enough, maybe it was part of a pestle and mortar set.
in both cases, sophisticated checking and analysing could confirm, from food residues, my second assumption.
and from iron residues, maybe the first was right.
maybe it was also a stone to scub raw skins, but for that it should have to be sharper and already more worn down.

w.meijerink
19-10-2008, 23:42
Forget it Im sure now...................................

It's the man with the hammer on monday morning :bash:

Korotky Gennady
20-10-2008, 12:40
I thought that it's an ancient pocket fallo-imitator.

Korotky Gennady
20-10-2008, 12:44
This is what happens when people have too much time on their handsExactly !

Willy
20-10-2008, 12:50
being a chef 2 things come to my mind, because the stone is rather smooth on the side and the brown 'spots' could be from iron.. maybe it was a stone to be used as a sharpening for tools like knives and the like.
on the other hand, while the end is not smooth enough, maybe it was part of a pestle and mortar set.
in both cases, sophisticated checking and analysing could confirm, from food residues, my second assumption.
and from iron residues, maybe the first was right.
maybe it was also a stone to scub raw skins, but for that it should have to be sharper and already more worn down.


I don't think they had knives 1000 years ago but you could be right about the iron, there is a lot in this area, so much that you could taste it in the water.

I was thinking about getting it check to see if there is any residues from food because it would confrim what it was used for but I did use it once to mash nuts.

Scub raw skins? yes they could have, I didn't really think of that but they would have used it for all they could I guess.

It just fits so good in your hand.

is4fun
21-10-2008, 00:34
http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/homs/tools1.gif