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Korkelia
14-10-2008, 22:38
Hi,
Thought this information may be helpful to someone. I’ve made a list of shops that sell books in English. Many of them also have Russian literature in English. Shops listed below range from my most favourite to the least ones.

If you think I’ve missed a good bookstore please feel free to add. I appreciate that very much.

BUKVA
Metro – Park Kultury
Address – 17 Zubovsky blvd., korpus 1, 3rd floor

MOSKOVSKY DOM KNIGI
Metro – Arbatskaya
Address – 8 Novyi Arbat Ul.

ANGLIA BRITISH BOOKSHOP
Metro – Mayakovskaya
Address – 6/11 Vorotnikovsky pereulok

ANGLIYSKAYA KNIGA NA KUZNETSKOM
Metro – Kuznetsky Most
Address – 18/7 Kuznetsky Most

RELOD (1)
Metro – Pushkinskaya, Chekhovskaya
Address – 23/8 Bolshaya Dmitrovka

UNIVERSUM
Metro – Barrikadnaya, Borovitskaya
Address – 16/5 Malaya Nikitskaya, stroenie 1
(It’s an antique shop and they offer only second-hand books. Closed on Sundays)

DOM KNIGI MOSKVA
Metro – Pushkinskaya, Tverskaya, Chekhovskaya
Address – 8 Tverskaya Ul.

MOLODAYA GVARDIA
Metro – Polianka
Address – 28 Bolshaya Polianka, stroenie 1, 1st floor

BIBLIO-GLOBUS
Metro – Lubianka
Address – 6/3 Myasnitskaya Ul., stroenie 5, 2nd floor

RELOD (2)
Metro – Sukharevskaya
Address – 15/17 Pushkarev pereulok

DOM PEDAGOGICHESKOY KNIGI
Metro – Okhotnyi Riad, Teatralnaya, Pushkinskaya, Chekhovskaya
Address – 7/5 Bolshaya Dmitrovka Ul., 2nd floor

RESPUBLIKA (1)
Metro – Mayakovskaya
Address – 1st 10 Tverskaya-Yamskaya Ul., 1st floor

RESPUBLIKA (2)
Metro – Serpukhovskaya
Address – 38 Stremianny pereulok
(Most of what they have are dictionaries.)

Transparent Theatre
14-10-2008, 23:09
If you think I’ve missed a good bookstore please feel free to add.

I wish there was a good one. Even just ONE.

Conan-Doyle stories in simplified English... ho-hum :(

And "O'Henry", the author no-one in English-speaking countries has ever heard of...

And Galsworthy :((

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 00:14
To TT:

Try BUKVA and ANGLIYSKAYA KNIGA na Kuznetskom. Maybe they will have something to your taste. I was actually very pleased when I've found Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Thin Man" in BUKVA.
And I think I might have seen O'Henry on Kuznetsky, though I'm not sure because I was distracted by Nuriev biography book.

Transparent Theatre
15-10-2008, 00:35
To TT:

Try BUKVA and ANGLIYSKAYA KNIGA na Kuznetskom.

I haven't been in there for years - if you think it's worth a try, I will take a look next time I am passing that way :)

What's frustrating is the absence of new books - cheap editions of out-of-copyright classics are better than nothing, I suppose... but it's not my idea of a GOOD bookshop. I dream of a branch of Waterstones in Moscow...

Welcome to Waterstones.com (http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/home.do)

Albertina
15-10-2008, 00:53
I have to agree with TT - no matter how many there are on the list, the overal choice is crap!

Only on Tverskaya 8, I can occasionally find something new and good.

For some reasons there are tons of Learning materials for all languages, but nothing virtually to read!

I dream of Borders and B&N ;)

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 01:34
I agree with both of you that Moscow's bookstores are nothing as compared to London's shops.
That is why I was suggesting book exchange. Some people bring books from London or US.
In Moscow you will probably find the same books everywhere but I've been in Bukva and on Kuznetsky Most and liked it there.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 01:49
Some people bring books from London or US.


Do you have much time to read books, dear?
Sometimes I buy books but never read them...;-(

Korotky Gennady
15-10-2008, 04:22
I wish there was a good one. Even just ONE.



And "O'Henry", the author no-one in English-speaking countries has ever heard of...

((
:duhhhh: ?
Nobody heard about O' Henry there ? How can it be ?

Korotky Gennady
15-10-2008, 04:24
Do you have much time to read books, dear?
Sometimes I buy books but never read them...;-(Then why do you buy them ? :duhhhh:

Korotky Gennady
15-10-2008, 04:27
That is why I was suggesting book exchange. Some people bring books from London or US.
In Moscow you will probably find the same books everywhere but I've been in Bukva and on Kuznetsky Most and liked it there.:floating: Eleborate your point, please.

Korotky Gennady
15-10-2008, 04:28
I dream of Borders and B&N ;) Did you mean Bodler ?

Transparent Theatre
15-10-2008, 05:37
Then why do you buy them ? :duhhhh:

No, I can understand that. If you go to a bookshop, you can pick it up, read a little bit, and see if it seems maybe interesting or not.

But if you live in the English-book-desert of Moscow, you have to order books on the internet, on the basis of reviews or recommendations. Often you end-up with books which are not what you really wanted.

J.D.
15-10-2008, 06:02
And "O'Henry", the author no-one in English-speaking countries has ever heard of...

:((
Another dig at your Nemesis, (the largest English speaking country in the world), suggesting they don't speak English?

Transparent Theatre
15-10-2008, 06:41
Another dig at your Nemesis, (the largest English speaking country in the world), suggesting they don't speak English?

Nope :) "O Henry" isn't a major author in the English language. He was promoted in the USSR because he appeared to criticise social conditions in the USA. Rather in the same way as the weary blah of John Galsworthy (my nemesis too??) who was promoted in the USSR too for similar reasons.

Many American authors - as you know - have high reputations in Britain, and are published and sold in great numbers there. "O Henry" isn't one of them ;)

It's a pity that these second-raters are still promoted (and published) at the expense of the genuinely good American and English authors of the C20th. It's a bit like selling beads to natives :( But I guess the good ones would expect to be paid... ;)

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 09:25
Did you mean Bodler ?

Who is Bodler?
It’s a Borders, baby.
What is Borders?
It’s a bookshop.
Whose bookshop is this?
It’s in London, baby. It's in London.

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 09:40
Do you have much time to read books, dear?
Sometimes I buy books but never read them...;-(

I do. When you really want to do something you always find time. I can read all night if the book turns me on.
I bring books from abroad myself too. And sometimes I read books online.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 09:46
Then why do you buy them ? :duhhhh:

In the hope of reading them. Or at least looking at pics.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 09:49
I do. When you really want to do something you always find time. I can read all night if the book turns me on.
I bring books from abroad myself too. And sometimes I read books online.

Oh dear! Didn't we meet in Charing Cross?
And why is your av so sexual?

MissAnnElk
15-10-2008, 09:56
:duhhhh: ?
Nobody heard about O' Henry there ? How can it be ?

Because he's American . . .:snoring:

Seriously, he's old news. Something kids read in middle school. Yawn.

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 09:56
:floating: Eleborate your point, please.

As I was saying the variety of books somewhat the same in every store. You can see the same books and authors everywhere. I’d like to see more to choose from.

MissAnnElk
15-10-2008, 09:58
I used to special order books from time to time from one English language book shop when I lived in Bratislava. Things I liked, which were often different than what I was seeing in the shops. But it always seemed that a month or so later, I would see these books in the other shops. Was I ahead of the curve? Or were the other shops doing market research on their competitor? It was weird.

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 10:05
Oh dear! Didn't we meet in Charing Cross?
And why is your av so sexual?

No, I don’t believe we did.
I am an exceptionally good kisser so the avatar gives you a hint.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 10:19
No, I don’t believe we did.
I am an exceptionally good kisser so the avatar gives you a hint.

But I met some good kissers there...
Anyway I take the hint!

PS: How about your photo?

MissAnnElk
15-10-2008, 10:23
PS: How about your photo?

FRESH!
:nono::nono::nono::nono:

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 10:41
FRESH!
:nono::nono::nono::nono:

Oh Ann, gender issues are so traditional but still forever fresh, don't you agree?

MissAnnElk
15-10-2008, 10:50
Oh Ann, gender issues are so traditional but still forever fresh, don't you agree?

I mean this definition, you cheeky devil:

get fresh
to show by your actions or words that you want to have sex with someone. If he tries to get fresh with you, tell him to keep his hands to himself. (usually + with)

get fresh with someone (American & Australian)
to talk to someone in an impolite way or behave in a way which shows you do not respect them. Don't you get fresh with me, young lady!


:neiner::neiner:

J.D.
15-10-2008, 10:55
TP's point was that O'henry isn't known in English speaking countries.
He is very well known in the U.S. He is probably read more by teenagers than adults but that's beside the point. Whinnie the Pooh isn't read by adults either.(well maybe read by adults but not for their benefit)
But I digress, this is expat.ru and the point here is not to stay on the point.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 10:59
I mean this definition, you cheeky devil:

get fresh
to show by your actions or words that you want to have sex with someone. If he tries to get fresh with you, tell him to keep his hands to himself. (usually + with)

get fresh with someone (American & Australian)
to talk to someone in an impolite way or behave in a way which shows you do not respect them. Don't you get fresh with me, young lady!


:neiner::neiner:

I didn't mean anything like this. I just asked for a photo.

MissAnnElk
15-10-2008, 11:07
I didn't mean anything like this. I just asked for a photo.

Tra lala lala . . .:soccer:

We still love you. And I admire your tenacity . . . you're a man who knows what he likes! And what he likes is pretty women.

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 11:13
Whinnie the Pooh isn't read by adults either.(well maybe read by adults but not for their benefit)


Try to read Whinne the Pooh or Alice in Wonderland when you had a little :lovepot:
You will see the whole new world in there.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 11:17
Try to read Whinne the Pooh or Alice in Wonderland when you had a little :lovepot:
You will see the whole new world in there.
W-the-P is too olld and traditional...
Did you read Paddington Bear?

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 11:24
Tra lala lala . . .:soccer:

We still love you. And I admire you tenacity . . . you're a man who knows what he likes! And what he likes is pretty women.

Who loves me - sign up here.

Transparent Theatre
15-10-2008, 12:47
Try to read Whinne the Pooh or Alice in Wonderland when you had a little :lovepot:
You will see the whole new world in there.

Without offence, can I please correct the spelling here?

This bear's name in English is "Winnie-The-Pooh", and he doesn't have any "h" in his first name :)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MSY8V6HNL._SS500_.jpg

The books were written by A.A.Milne, with the classic illustrations by E.H. Shepard. The Disneyfication of Pooh came a lot later and is, IMHO, a very regrettable trend - it slashed the subtlety of the original books to ribbons, and changed the texts for simpler ones.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 12:49
Absolutely. And he isn't a whiner... ;-)

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 17:10
Without offence, can I please correct the spelling here?

None taken. Thank you.

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 17:16
But I met some good kissers there...
Anyway I take the hint!

PS: How about your photo?

Curiosity killed the Cat :-)

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 17:54
W-the-P is too olld and traditional...
Did you read Paddington Bear?

Nope. I was reading Shakespeare as a kid.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 17:57
Nope. I was reading Shakespeare as a kid.

Would you like to read it?
I have one.

Albertina
15-10-2008, 19:12
Tra lala lala . . .:soccer:

We still love you. And I admire your tenacity . . . you're a man who knows what he likes! And what he likes is pretty women.

so many words to describe a stalker! :snoring:

Korkelia
15-10-2008, 20:20
Would you like to read it?
I have one.

Thank you. But I prefer to buy one when I have my own children. This way I will have the most of it.

AndreyS
15-10-2008, 22:32
so many words to describe a stalker! :snoring:

Don't worry I am leaving.

Albertina
15-10-2008, 22:41
Don't worry I am leaving.

Have a good trip!

Korotky Gennady
16-10-2008, 01:00
In the hope of reading them. Or at least looking at pics.at porno ones ?

Korotky Gennady
16-10-2008, 01:02
Try to read Whinne the Pooh or Alice in Wonderland when you had a little :lovepot:

.a little of what ? :10641:

Korotky Gennady
16-10-2008, 01:09
TP's point was that O'henry isn't known in English speaking countries.
He is very well known in the U.S. He is probably read more by teenagers than adults but that's beside the point. Whinnie the Pooh isn't read by adults either.(well maybe read by adults but not for their benefit)
But I digress, this is expat.ru and the point here is not to stay on the point.
Well, when i was a teenager, I red him a lot too... And really i think that he is worth of that... But I want to ask Niel... what american writer does he know... who is more good than O'Henry as a writer.

I think that the best american writers whom I know... are O'Henry, London, Draizer and Mark Twen.

Plus Steven King...

Korotky Gennady
16-10-2008, 01:12
Nope. I was reading Shakespeare as a kid.

For sure it was too early for you.

is4fun
16-10-2008, 01:28
a little of what ? :10641:

An exhausted woody! Must it be spelled out? LOL

pjw
16-10-2008, 01:30
Well, when i was a teenager, I red him a lot too... And really i think that he is worth of that... But I want to ask Niel... what american writer does he know... who is more good than O'Henry as a writer.

I think that the best american writers whom I know... are O'Henry, London, Draizer and Mark Twen.

Plus Steven King...
Oh listen man, you gotta try John Steinbeck. Start with some of his easy books: The Pearl, then Of Mice and Men. This will give you a taste. Then move onto his other books: Grapes of Wrath etc. His books are so readable and so real. After that you're ready for his classic: East of Eden. It's such a perfect book. My most beloved book of all time. Gena, please believe me, this author could be a big part of your life, as he is mine. And it's not so hard to read, it's a great style. He takes care to make it interesting and a pleasure for readers. I read some in German, so you can in English Gena, easily. Enjoy. Start with The Pearl and Of Mice and Men. Ok, I see you in 2 weeks, so I'll bring you copies buddy :sunny:

Transparent Theatre
16-10-2008, 05:39
what american writer does he know... who is more good than O'Henry as a writer.

I think that the best american writers whom I know... are O'Henry, London, Draizer and Mark Twen.


The list would go on for a long time :) But my shortlist would include:

Saul Bellow (ok, technically he was born in Canada, but worked in Chicago)
JD Sallinger
Leon Uris
Isaac Bashevis Singer
Joseph Heller
Dorothy West
Paul Theroux (with some reservations)
Hunter S Thompson
Tenessee Williams
Edgar Allen Poe
John Updike
Norman Mailer
Truman Capote
Tom Wolfe
Raymond Chandler (held UK Citizenship for some period, born USA)
Kinky Friedman
Mickey Spillane (crime novels)
John Steinbeck
Christopher Isherwood (born UK, emigrated to USA)
James Thurber (surely one of the most original voices in American writing?)
John Cheever
Groucho Marx
Dorothy Parker
Jack Kerouac
Henry Miller
Allen Ginsburg (poet)
Robert Frost (one of my favourite poets - I come back to him frequently)
Herman Melville
Toni Morrison
Philip Roth
William Faulkner
Sylvia Plath
Kurt Vonnegut
Ernest Hemingway
Henry David Thoreau
Walt Whitman (poet)
Henry James
T S Eliot (born USA)

and so many, many more..........

О Генри отдыхает!!!!!!!!!! :jester:

Korkelia
16-10-2008, 07:38
a little of what ? :10641:

Cannabis sativa L., also known as Marijuana

Korkelia
16-10-2008, 08:33
For sure it was too early for you.

For a goodnight sleep my father would read me ancient Greek stories. That was his idea of fairytales. By the time I went to school I knew everything about Greek Gods and a host of their not-so-Olympic relatives.

My mother’s choice was different: Brothers Grimm or Master & Margareta by Mikhail Bulgakov. And all kind of romantic adventure stories :-)

When I could read well myself (in Russian, of course) I really enjoyed Agatha Christie and Shakespeare (comedies mostly, because of the happy end).

Adain
16-10-2008, 19:42
Frank McCourt - Angela's Ashes and 'Tis (Angela's Ashes 2)

Every expat should read them.

pjw
16-10-2008, 21:34
I would also recommend Hannibal and Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris. Beautiful books. I've no interest in seeing the films as I've got my own story playing in my mind and wouldn't like to disturb this with someone else's perceptions and imaginations. I'm not against films in general, just not in this case. For me the books are special and personal :book:

Ody
16-10-2008, 23:15
When I was a child granny red me Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Secret Garden, Little Princess,Little Lord Fauntleroy... I knew it by heart

Then list of my favotite was added by
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Philip Pullman - His Dark Materials,The Sally Lockhart Quartet
Theodor Draizer
John Grisham
W Shakespeare
Charles Dickens
Oscar Wild
R J Stuart
King Arthur Tales by Andrew Lang
Jule Verne
Alexandre Dumas
in english,russian and french

in lieu of flowers
26-10-2008, 15:12
The list would go on for a long time :) But my shortlist would include:

Saul Bellow (ok, technically he was born in Canada, but worked in Chicago)
I had trouble reading Augie March. Is it me just not being ready for all the intensity or is it because you won't enjoy him unless you are into epic ubernaturalistic scrutinizng? ... why is he a good writer?

in lieu of flowers
26-10-2008, 15:20
Tom Wolfe. I know he is well revered in the US. To me, he sounds like a lifeless ivory-towerish (or rather university-campusish) creative-writing-teaching pocket author. He wants to sound big, and he is professional. I want a writer to be big, not just to sound big or even just want to sound big. Then, they might just as well be less professional.

Transparent Theatre
26-10-2008, 15:28
Tom Wolfe. I know he is well revered in the US. To me, he sounds like a lifeless ivory-towerish (or rather university-campusish) creative-writing-teaching pocket author. He wants to sound big, and he is professional. I want a writer to be big, not just to sound big or even just want to sound big. Then, they might just as well be less professional.

For Bonfire Of The Vanities alone he deserves the title of "great writer", I would say - a remarkable achievement, considering the level to which he'd made himself unpopular among his contemporaries and critics at the time... but even they were forced to concede it's an astonishing piece of writing.

I can't say I like Wolfe much as a person, but that doesn't detract from the quality of his work.

in lieu of flowers
26-10-2008, 16:51
I'm still wary... I've only read two of his short stories and I have a feeling that he is a good psychologist, and he can spell out what's inside his characters' heads, but he is also writing in stereotypes.

in lieu of flowers
26-10-2008, 17:07
Groucho Marx?! A writer?! What do I know?

Transparent Theatre
26-10-2008, 23:47
Groucho Marx?! A writer?! What do I know?

His collected Letters are some of the funniest stuff I've read.

Pinsleepe
09-11-2008, 00:00
Coming back to the topic of good bookshops: a friend showed me this one, is a bit hard to find, but sooo worth it.

No clue what it's called, but here are the directions: Go to metro station Paveletskaya. Get out in the direction of Kinoteatr Pyat Zvoyzd/Five Stars. When you get out of the metro, turn left. You pass a little bus stop and Yevroset. Turn left into the first street. Keep on the left side of the road. You pass a restaurant and the VTB bank. Now the tricky bit: look out for a little sign, standing on the pavement. The entrance to the bookshop is a grey door with no sign on it whatsoever.

If you are by the cinema, you passed it - go back :)

It's awfully confusing but once you get there, you won't regret it :) I know I was delighted about being able to buy the English translation of "Master and Margarita" for 240 roubles :)