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Transparent Theatre
09-10-2008, 23:14
In case anyone is interested...

... MELODIYA, the old soviet record-making monolith, is slowly realising the worth of what it's got in its back catalogue.

Although they managed to miss the Shostakovich 100th Anniversary last year (duuuuuuh)......

... they have FINALLY reissued the two most important box-sets of the composer's works!

THE COMPLETE SHOSTAKOVICH SYMPHONIES, in the definitive recordings conducted by Kirill Kondrashin (considered to be the best performances available - Shostakovich himself sat in on many of the recording sessions and advised) [ 1590 roubles for the 11-cd set.]

THE COMPLETE SHOSTAKOVICH STRING QUARTETS, recorded by the Borodin Quartet. (This has been out-of-print for so long that copies were changing hands on eBay for over $200 among collectors) [ 990 roubles for the 5-cd set ]

Available now in the shops.

PS, yes, yes, it includes Symphony No 7, the famous one. And it's still marked "The Leningrad". But as any Russian musician will tell you, this is one of the USSR's most famous lies. Shostakovich never called it "the Leningrad", and it wasn't written to describe WW2. Shostakovich titled it "the Legendary", and it was written to describe Stalin's assault on Russia. But the composer was persuaded to change the title, because of the onset of WW2. This information was given by Rostropovich - one of the few musicians who didn't desert Shostakovich during the time he was being repressed - during a lecture at the Conservatoire he gave before his death. However, "no-one wants to know" these days :(

Korotky Gennady
10-10-2008, 04:47
PS, yes, yes, it includes Symphony No 7, the famous one. And it's still marked "The Leningrad". But as any Russian musician will tell you, this is one of the USSR's most famous lies. Shostakovich never called it "the Leningrad", and it wasn't written to describe WW2. Shostakovich titled it "the Legendary", and it was written to describe Stalin's assault on Russia. But the composer was persuaded to change the title, because of the onset of WW2. This information was given by Rostropovich - one of the few musicians who didn't desert Shostakovich during the time he was being repressed - during a lecture at the Conservatoire he gave before his death. However, "no-one wants to know" these days :(
Neil, I'm sorry but I heard Symphony No 7 a few times and I think that it was dedicated to the NAZI's invasion though... I think so becoz the symphony contains the one march... and the melody of that march reminds the the melodies of nazi's marches of those years. I think that this march is the best part of the symphony. It expesses the crazyness and awfull strength of Evil...

And you know... Rostropovich hated USSR very much so he could misrepresent the facts.

Korotky Gennady
10-10-2008, 04:54
I hope that the next step of Melody will be releasing of the collection of Prokophiev's symphonies.

I think that he was the genius also...