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View Full Version : Renewing work permit and visa - do we have to go through it all again?



tgma
11-09-2008, 12:40
Our law firm, which handles all our corporate stuff, has just told me that in order to renew the work permits (received late last year) and work visas (received in March this year), we have to go through the same procedure as though we were starting from nothing. This means submitting full medical tests, etc, and although they haven't said so, now I'm concerned that we'll have to do visa runs again, to get single entries.
This sounds wrong to me.
Has anyone else renewed a work permit recently? Did you need to do all the medical tests?

MaltSokol
12-09-2008, 08:17
That has been published in The Moscow Times. Certainly, they said that foreign labor force will have to undergo full medical tests (здравоохранение РФ) to renew the work permits. I don't think you'll have to do visa runs though. It is said in the article that the previous situation (only HIV) was a courtesy arrangement between AMCHAM and FMS heads.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/article/1010/42/370790.htm

Carbo
17-09-2008, 15:34
That has been published in The Moscow Times. Certainly, they said that foreign labor force will have to undergo full medical tests (здравоохранение РФ) to renew the work permits. I don't think you'll have to do visa runs though. It is said in the article that the previous situation (only HIV) was a courtesy arrangement between AMCHAM and FMS heads.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/article/1010/42/370790.htm
OK, it's the law, and we all have to abide by it if we want to stay.

But it is an absurd law.

Fair enough, test people when they come in, but I know people who have been here ten years, are residents, and who have Russian wives and children, and still must be tested for leprosy every year.

The irony is, I actually increase my chances of catching these diseases by living in Russia rather than my home town. So, in theory, each year my chances of failing medical exams increases.

The law is an ass.

MissAnnElk
17-09-2008, 18:04
True: if you want to come, live here, pay taxes, and abide by the law, you must be tested for leprosy. Oh, and in a country with alleged epidemic HIV rates (I believe UNDP said Russia is approaching 1 percent of the population . . . but I'd have to check . . . that might have been Ukraine) . . . yeah, yeah, I know they don't want a burden on the dole/health care system. But please.

Now if you want to come in a tourist visa, do the nightclub scene, BYO nasties . . . No problem!

MissAnnElk
18-09-2008, 07:52
And, my vigilant Russian girlfriend has just pointed out to me that the US has the following in its explanation of what one needs as an immigrant:

What is a communicable disease of public health significance?

A “communicable disease of public health significance” is defined in the HHS regulations that cover the required medical exam for immigration purposes and includes the following 9 infectious medical conditions:

* severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
* tuberculosis (TB)
* leprosy
* human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS)
* syphilis (infectious state)
* chancroid (STD, similar to syphilis and herpes)
* gonorrhea
* granuloma inguinale (STD, donovanosis)
* lymphogranuloma (STD, chlamydia)

So, we started it.

Carbo
18-09-2008, 09:35
And, my vigilant Russian girlfriend has just pointed out to me that the US has the following in its explanation of what one needs as an immigrant:

What is a communicable disease of public health significance?

A “communicable disease of public health significance” is defined in the HHS regulations that cover the required medical exam for immigration purposes and includes the following 9 infectious medical conditions:

* severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
* tuberculosis (TB)
* leprosy
* human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS)
* syphilis (infectious state)
* chancroid (STD, similar to syphilis and herpes)
* gonorrhea
* granuloma inguinale (STD, donovanosis)
* lymphogranuloma (STD, chlamydia)

So, we started it.
There are two main differences, though. First, it is more likely that a person moving to the US will have, say TB than an American or western European would moving to Russia. I have never met anyone with TB. Ever.

Second, I'm sure the Americans don't make you do it every year.

salmoxis
20-09-2008, 09:16
OK, it's the law, and we all have to abide by it if we want to stay.

The irony is, I actually increase my chances of catching these diseases by living in Russia rather than my home town. So, in theory, each year my chances of failing medical exams increases.

The law is an ass.

amen to that