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juliaoptimist
08-09-2008, 14:23
I am a single female who was born in, and lived all of my life in Russia until five years ago. Since this time, I have been a permanent resident of the Netherlands. I must soon apply for a Dutch passport, and because I am now single, I am required to renounce my Russian citizenship in order to obtain a Dutch passport.

My question I hope someone can help me with is - if I renounce my Russian citizenship, how difficult will it be to return to Russia to live permanently if I decide to do so in the future? Will I ever be able to have a Russian passport or residence again?

Thanks for any advice you may be able to provide.

MaltSokol
09-09-2008, 01:11
Russian authorities ignore the oath you make when you are granted a new citizenship. When on Russian soil, you will continue being Russian.
If you plan to keep visiting Russia, I would recommend you to continue renewing your passports at your consulate (both internal and zagranpasport) to avoid problems that might prevent you from going back to the Netherlands for months on an eventual visit to Russia.
You shouldn't visit Russia as Dutch citizen with a Russian visa on your passport, as you could get in trouble if they found out that you are in fact a Russian national. And definitely you should show the same passport at passport control when entering and leaving Russia.
People agree with me?

juliaoptimist
09-09-2008, 01:34
Russian authorities ignore the oath you make when you are granted a new citizenship. When on Russian soil, you will continue being Russian.

Alberto, thank you.

Does this mean that Russia will not permit its citizens to renounce their citizenship? This is important because I understand that Netherlands permits an exception to the requirement to renounce foreign citizenship - in the case that that country does not accept the renouncing of citizenship.

However I am not sure whether Netherlands will take my Russian passport when I become a Dutch citizen.

juliaoptimist
09-09-2008, 09:31
Just to complicate things a little further, I own an apartment in Russia and have a teenage son born in Russia. I wonder how this affects the situation.

rusmeister
09-09-2008, 10:14
Does this mean that Russia will not permit its citizens to renounce their citizenship?
You almost certainly have to go to a Russian consulate/embassy to formally renounce citizenship. Otherwise, it is just not going to register with them (unless you are big and famous, or trying to be).



However I am not sure whether Netherlands will take my Russian passport when I become a Dutch citizen.
The US certainly does not do this.
In general, one state can't make a decision for another state, thus, for anything to count with the other state, you have to do it formally with them. The passport is technically the property of a foreign state, so taking it can lead to legal landmines.

I know of a number of Russians who get their American passport and cheerfully continue to travel to Russia on their Russian ones, and there doesn't seem to be a whole lot a government can do about it. Same thing goes for cases where they can see that your children hold dual citizenship. They will wag a finger at you, and make ominous hints that can't add up to dire threats, but that's about all.

juliaoptimist
09-09-2008, 10:22
rusmeister, thank you!

Won't there be problems travelling back to Holland if I ever visit Russia? Won't Russian officials want to see a visa to Holland in my Russian passport before they let me fly to Holland?

Surfsup37
09-09-2008, 13:44
My son has dual Russian/American citizenship. When leaving Russia, you show your Russian passport to Russian passport control, and your Dutch passport to the Dutch passport control. Russian passport control doesn't care where you are going or how you are going to get there.


Note: In the news recently, a dual citizen (British/Russian) was in Russia with her child, also dual citizenship. They were both in Russia on their Russian passports.

The child's biological father is now preventing the child from leaving Russia, and the British government can do nothing. If you have or could have any type of relative problems with your child, then you could have problems while in Russia.

MaltSokol
09-09-2008, 18:11
Won't there be problems travelling back to Holland if I ever visit Russia? Won't Russian officials want to see a visa to Holland in my Russian passport before they let me fly to Holland?

That's the point, Russian officials don't care, they just don't check your foreign visa on your Russian zagranpasport when you leave Russia. The ones who check it are the airline ground crew at the check-in desk.
Airlines don't care about dual citizenships, so people usually show both passports when checking in, and the passport of the country at the passport control.

Penguin_The_Great
09-09-2008, 18:46
Julia, both the US and Great Britain do not require renouncing your original citizenship when you acquire theirs. It seems like your circumstances are different.

Russia allows renouncing its citizenship, but itís a lengthy and complicated procedure. Youíll have to officially unregister from your apartment, get a note that you donít owe any taxes, etc.
Iíve heard that thereís a way to restart your Russian citizenship even if you lost it. Try asking here: migrants.ru.

Good luck!

juliaoptimist
09-09-2008, 20:06
Thanks for everybody's kind assistance.

I talked to the Dutch immigration department today. They appear to require proof from the Russian embassy that I have handed in my passport. So it looks like I will not be able to keep my passport. I am not sure how reliable the information they told me is though. I'm not sure I asked the question to them the right way.

rusmeister
15-09-2008, 03:12
Thanks for everybody's kind assistance.

I talked to the Dutch immigration department today. They appear to require proof from the Russian embassy that I have handed in my passport. So it looks like I will not be able to keep my passport. I am not sure how reliable the information they told me is though. I'm not sure I asked the question to them the right way.

It is generally best to ask them such questions anonymously.

Surfsup also had a good point. A good motivation to work on good relations with your spouse and not to see divorce as an easy way out!

fco1922
08-01-2009, 18:46
Every country is different but it is virtually certain that if you turn in your passport to the Russian Embassy, they will be only too happy to return it to you. In the case of Denmark, my Russian friend surrendered her Russian passport to the Russian Embassy and told them why (it was necessary to become a Danish citizen). The Russians said ok and told her she could collect it later.

The reality is that it is very hard to effectively renounce your Russian citizenship (this is not always a good thing). You can file the paperwork but it may never be approved. So I wouldn't worry.

It is the same in Europe. British law has a provision that you can re-apply for your British citizenship if you were required to renounce it to acquire another citizenship. The USA operates a similar policy.

BeachBum
08-01-2009, 19:01
Thanks for everybody's kind assistance.

I talked to the Dutch immigration department today. They appear to require proof from the Russian embassy that I have handed in my passport. So it looks like I will not be able to keep my passport. I am not sure how reliable the information they told me is though. I'm not sure I asked the question to them the right way.
pay off somebody and get some bulshit document. Never renounce your citizenship. this is your birthright. you would sell that to live in the Netherlands!??

grosser schwanz
28-04-2009, 06:48
Alberto, thank you.

Does this mean that Russia will not permit its citizens to renounce their citizenship? This is important because I understand that Netherlands permits an exception to the requirement to renounce foreign citizenship - in the case that that country does not accept the renouncing of citizenship.

However I am not sure whether Netherlands will take my Russian passport when I become a Dutch citizen.

Why not, you can. Of course, it`s better not to go there, unless for dare necessity. Never saw or heard of anybody, who met all requirements to renounce Russian/soviet citizenship.